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[Low-Carb Diets]: Now with awesome recipes on the first page!

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Posts

  • NODeNODe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    So, this is my current diet:

    Breakfast: 1/3cup of oatmeal + 1/3 cup of mixed fresh fruit + splenda (one packet)

    Lunch + floating snack: Leafy green salad w/ nuts and fruit (sometimes cheese)
    Assorted vegetables (cauliflower, brocolli, zuchinni etc.)
    Small yoghurt (Source)
    More nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts usually)

    Dinner: Chicken breast, Assorted cooked or cold vegetables, sometimes a salad instead.

    10-14 glasses of water/ peppermint tea

    So, it's low carb, but not really high protein at all.
    I've done Atkins before and then a sort of modified Dr. Bernstein, lost 60 lbs over 6 months (250lbs-190lbs)
    Then I fell off the wagon hard and gained 80 lbs over about 2 years.
    I was diagnosed with high blood pressure about 6 months ago (220/120 at it's worst...so yeah...) so that's removed a lot of the "easier" meat options.

    I've lost about 20lbs over the last 3 months on this diet, with daily rigorous exercise. It's been hard to stay ON the diet though, and that 3 months has seen a lot of breaks.

    Does this look like a sensible way to eat or would being on this diet for years do something horrible to me?

    NODe on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited May 2010
    I don't see how meat is off the table because you have high blood pressure. High blood pressure is caused by insulin and, to a lesser extent, salt. Meat by itself will not raise it.

    Fruit is probably fine in low/moderate amounts (depending on the kind... I'd go with berries), but you should ditch the oatmeal and yoghurt, and also make sure the vegetables you eat are not starchy. A few exceptions exist for this apparently, such as yellow sweet potatoes ("yams" aren't good though).

    To get more protein, eat more meat. Fish is good if you can afford it. But don't shy away from steak, pork, and chicken. As long as your carb intake is low, and as long as you don't eat carbs with them, they will be okay. I also recommend buying protein powder (whey or casein) and downing a scoop with a cup of water everyday.

    Also, try to find almond butter. It's amazing. In addition, avocados are great due to their high fat and fiber content.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    make your yogurt full fat, switch your oatmeal to eggs, maybe switch to thighs instead of breast and that'd be pretty good eating

    fat helps you stay full man

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
    poo
  • MagicPrimeMagicPrime FiresideWizard Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    It's also grilling season.

    Low-Carb diets are a great excuse to use the grill as much as possible. I know I do.

    I have a bunch of chicken marinading in some red-wine vinegar, olive oil, and garlic at home.

    MagicPrime on
    BNet • magicprime#1430 | PSN/Steam • MagicPrime | Origin • FireSideWizard
    Critical Failures - Havenhold CampaignAugust St. Cloud (Human Ranger)
  • NODeNODe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Right, to clarify, I mean processed meats, bacon etc. that tend to be easy to throw together or take for lunch at work with little to no prep. I'm keeping a very close eye on my sodium intake.

    Fruit is almost entirely berries, although that tends to get bulked out with a small amount of apple. Not more than 2/3 of a cup of a fruit a day for the most part.

    The yoghurt is about 6 carbs I think, is there any reason to get rid of it other than it's carb load?

    Yeah, the chicken are thighs more often than breasts.

    NODe on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited May 2010
    Only 6g? What kind of yoghurt is that? Most nutrition facts I see show anywhere between 11g and 20g.

    And it's not just carbs... it's sugar. That's what you need to avoid, even though it's low glycemic index.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • NODeNODe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Yeah, it's this yoghurt

    NODe on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    NODe wrote: »
    Yeah, it's this yoghurt

    get full fat greek yogurt. good stuff.

    geckahn on
  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited May 2010
    Perpetual wrote: »
    What do you think a calorie is and how does it relate to the human body? If you don't know that, then you won't be able to understand the answer to the question you posed.

    It's past my bedtime, so the Socratic method isn't feasible. Here's the answer:

    A (food) calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius. The method for measuring calories is to put the food item in a calorimeter. It's a completely closed system to ensure all the energy is accounted for.

    You body does not operate like this. Energy is converted from carbs, fats, and proteins in different ways. Also, if your diet is ketogenic, your liver must convert some proteins into glucose. That takes energy (fat) and resources (protein). This is the reason why the "a calorie is a calorie" theory violates the second law of thermodynamics.

    But this is a very small part of the entire process. Our bodies use the energy in different ways depending on a host of conditions like hormone levels. Whether the energy that was converted from food ultimately goes into fat cells for storage or muscle cells for energy is based on a very complex symphony of feedback systems.

    So...to answer your original question, calories really don't directly have much to do with the way humans metabolize food. To talk about "excess calories" is absurd since it begs the question. It's premise assumes your stomach works like a steam engine or something.

    Furthermore, I provide proof in the OP that no two people handle calories the same. Watch the documentary and ask yourself where the calories went. If calories mean what most people assume them to mean, how the hell did some people gain more than others?

    This idea that weight loss can be managed in a meaningful way by calculating calories is horseshit. The entire premise is false, so the question is invalid.

    Here is the OP he's talking about. It's VERY informative, with plenty of links.

    This is excellent. I will add it to the OP later.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The feeling a lot of you are describing where you don't feel deathly hungry but instead your body gives you a gentle signal that it's time to eat describes what happened to me once I started eating healthier about two or three years ago, and I'm definitely not on a low-carb diet. I could probably focus on getting more protein though, and I'll try to do that this summer.
    tehmarken wrote: »
    The human body can't produce protein out of nowhere. You have to eat the amino acids that you can't produce; and the source of those amino acids are in the protein of animals and plants.

    Supposedly quinoa has an almost-perfect amino acid composition for humans.

    Cervetus on
    The libertarian response to anything is, "Sure, that works fine in practice, but it doesn't fly in theory."
  • YarYar Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Cervetus wrote: »
    The feeling a lot of you are describing where you don't feel deathly hungry but instead your body gives you a gentle signal that it's time to eat describes what happened to me once I started eating healthier about two or three years ago, and I'm definitely not on a low-carb diet. I could probably focus on getting more protein though, and I'll try to do that this summer.
    You should be more specific here. Many here would say that low-carb is the most significant way to eat healthier, so saying that you started eating healthier but not low-carb doesn't explain much. If you were eating significantly fewer calories, or less sweets, or something like that, you would likely have experienced similar benefits.

    Yar on
  • CangoFettCangoFett Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    NODe wrote: »
    So, this is my current diet:

    Breakfast: 1/3cup of oatmeal + 1/3 cup of mixed fresh fruit + splenda (one packet)

    Lunch + floating snack: Leafy green salad w/ nuts and fruit (sometimes cheese)
    Assorted vegetables (cauliflower, brocolli, zuchinni etc.)
    Small yoghurt (Source)
    More nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts usually)

    Dinner: Chicken breast, Assorted cooked or cold vegetables, sometimes a salad instead.

    10-14 glasses of water/ peppermint tea

    So, it's low carb, but not really high protein at all.
    I've done Atkins before and then a sort of modified Dr. Bernstein, lost 60 lbs over 6 months (250lbs-190lbs)
    Then I fell off the wagon hard and gained 80 lbs over about 2 years.
    I was diagnosed with high blood pressure about 6 months ago (220/120 at it's worst...so yeah...) so that's removed a lot of the "easier" meat options.

    I've lost about 20lbs over the last 3 months on this diet, with daily rigorous exercise. It's been hard to stay ON the diet though, and that 3 months has seen a lot of breaks.

    Does this look like a sensible way to eat or would being on this diet for years do something horrible to me?

    Listen man, im no doctor, but that cant be healthy.

    Drink that water thruout the day, not all at once at dinner. Thats just silly

    CangoFett on
  • NODeNODe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    CangoFett wrote: »
    NODe wrote: »
    So, this is my current diet:

    Breakfast: 1/3cup of oatmeal + 1/3 cup of mixed fresh fruit + splenda (one packet)

    Lunch + floating snack: Leafy green salad w/ nuts and fruit (sometimes cheese)
    Assorted vegetables (cauliflower, brocolli, zuchinni etc.)
    Small yoghurt (Source)
    More nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts usually)

    Dinner: Chicken breast, Assorted cooked or cold vegetables, sometimes a salad instead.

    10-14 glasses of water/ peppermint tea

    So, it's low carb, but not really high protein at all.
    I've done Atkins before and then a sort of modified Dr. Bernstein, lost 60 lbs over 6 months (250lbs-190lbs)
    Then I fell off the wagon hard and gained 80 lbs over about 2 years.
    I was diagnosed with high blood pressure about 6 months ago (220/120 at it's worst...so yeah...) so that's removed a lot of the "easier" meat options.

    I've lost about 20lbs over the last 3 months on this diet, with daily rigorous exercise. It's been hard to stay ON the diet though, and that 3 months has seen a lot of breaks.

    Does this look like a sensible way to eat or would being on this diet for years do something horrible to me?

    Listen man, im no doctor, but that cant be healthy.

    Drink that water thruout the day, not all at once at dinner. Thats just silly

    Uh...yeah, that's throughout the day...

    NODe on
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Throughout the day is a bit crazy too.

    I only drink around 6 glasses of water a day and I'm pissing every 2 hours. I have nightmares of me needing to take a huge ass piss and wake up from those nightmares to take a huge ass piss.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    MagicPrime wrote: »
    Wait if I'm reading this right, a Ketogenic diet will let me eat lots of high fat cheese? Holy shit I'm trying that, if I gain 50 pounds at least I have an excuse.

    I love fine cheeses

    I wonder, can I eat chinese food sans rice? Something like beef and broccoli in a brown sauce, or is that still a carb nightmare?

    Be careful with breading and sauces. Sometimes the can use starches and syrups in their sauces and gravies that are carb loaded.

    Ofcourse, watch out for the rice.

    I have eaten at a few chinese buffets since getting on the diet, If you don't do it all the time and watch out for the obvious stuff It shouldn't impede your progress.

    You should be looking at your general diet trend, one meal here or there isn't going to destroy your effort or do all the work.

    Also, diary tend to have Lactose in it, though in the case of cheese I can't really think of a type of cheese that haves more then 1g of carbs in it. But, it's common for cheese maker to use corn starch in their shredded variety to avoid stickiness, maybe it's a trivial amount and I'm just being anal but it's unneeded starch non-the-less.

    Well I'm talking parmigiano-reggiano, very old chedder and gouda (omg flavor crystals), etc - nothing pre-shredded

    override367 on
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    eat white cheese not yellow cheese

    Paladin on
    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • giltanisgiltanis Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Paladin wrote: »
    eat white cheese not yellow cheese

    Yellow cheese is generally died that color so...

    giltanis on
    sig.gif
  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Throughout the day is a bit crazy too.

    I only drink around 6 glasses of water a day and I'm pissing every 2 hours. I have nightmares of me needing to take a huge ass piss and wake up from those nightmares to take a huge ass piss.

    It probably varies a lot from person to person. As a obese man myself (~350, although I no longer trust scales since my weight was as low as 337 after steady decline over a month, then suddenly 350 again), I probably go through at least 10 glasses a day, probably a good bit more, when it comes to water.

    Granted, I'm also doing P90X at the moment, which usually means 16-24 ounces during each workout as well.

    Vincent Grayson on
  • Joe ChemoJoe Chemo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    2 questions:

    How does a low-carb diet jive with glycogen depletion in athletes? I saw Protein Shakes throw out the number 10-40g of carbs a day is all we need. I have a hard time believing this is adequate to replace glycogen stores in a post-workout protein shake, let alone in an entire day.

    Secondly, although it's been a while since my last biochem class, I thought efficient breakdown of fats for fuel relied on the presence of carbs. When carbs are broken down it generates oxaloacetic acid, and oxaloacetic acid is needed to break down fats. How do you lose bodyfat in the absence of carbs?

    Joe Chemo on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar Audio Game Developer Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I can't think of a reason for athletes to be on any kind of extreme diet other than eat more and eat more better.

    Incenjucar on
  • Joe ChemoJoe Chemo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    I can't think of a reason for athletes to be on any kind of extreme diet other than eat more and eat more better.

    Weight-class athletes like wrestlers would be extremely interested in keeping BF levels low while maintaining lean body mass. Of course if said diet couldn't replenish glycogen properly then it might be a moot point.

    Joe Chemo on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Joe Chemo wrote: »
    How does a low-carb diet jive with glycogen depletion in athletes? I saw Protein Shakes throw out the number 10-40g of carbs a day is all we need. I have a hard time believing this is adequate to replace glycogen stores in a post-workout protein shake, let alone in an entire day.

    If you're competing or lifting for performance sake, you should not be on a ketogenic diet. I'd recommend a daily serving of sweet potatoes to go along with a generous portion of fruit etc. When it comes to replenishing glycogen carbs are definitely a better choice.

    Now that could still qualify as low carb, but you're talking more in the 100 to 150g a day level. Where under 50g you're ketogenic all day.

    geckahn on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited May 2010
    I have been in ketosis for the past two months and, after the first several days, it did not have any adverse effects on my lifting. It actually boosted my performance somewhat, but I can't explain it and don't feel like digging through scientific literature to find out.

    But that's just anecdotal.

    Perpetual on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    A word of advice for anyone who does this or is doing this.

    Once you hit your target weight and want to stop losing weight, you need to make an effort to eat more fat. While you were losing weight your body was running on both your food intake and on your fat stores, so if you had been eating lean meats (skinless chicken, lean steak cuts, lower fat ground beef, etc) you need to switch over to higher fat cuts.

    Otherwise you'll get too skinny. Definitely a problem I had for a little while.

    geckahn on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited May 2010
    You won't get too skinny if you had been working out during that time and getting enough protein. What you will end up with is very little body fat and a good amount of muscle.

    Also you need to eat fatty foods from the very beginning. Your split should be 65/40/5 f-p-c or even higher fat if you aren't lifting weights.

    Perpetual on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Perpetual wrote: »
    I have been in ketosis for the past two months and, after the first several days, it did not have any adverse effects on my lifting. It actually boosted my performance somewhat, but I can't explain it and don't feel like digging through scientific literature to find out.

    But that's just anecdotal.

    I think for someone lifting on a daily basis it won't be an issue. But if you're training for hours a day, getting ready for ironman, or the crossfit games, or any other high intensity long duration event you'll definitely see performance suffer under ketosis.

    geckahn on
  • 3drage3drage Registered User
    edited May 2010
    As far as low carb diets went, I found South beach to be quite a bit more heart-friendly than atkins. I wouldn't go back though because there was less satisfaction going without as opposed to having a little of everything.

    3drage on
  • surrealitychecksurrealitycheck the search for the means to put an end to things an end to speech is what enables the discourse to continue ~ * ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) excelsior * ~Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Is it possible to have a ketogenic diet that is full of really awesome stuff like fries and cheeseburgers (without actually being cheeseburgers and fries)?

    surrealitycheck on
    obF2Wuw.png
  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I eat cheeseburgers and fries... just not usually at the same time.

    Mblackwell on
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  • tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Ketosis seems only bad if you want to have endurance, since it is a way to continually cut body fat and muscle fat.

    From what I can tell, ketosis is when you take in virtually no glucose, so your body has to break down body fat and dietary fat to create glucose. This would be great for weight loss, but could be iffy for strength gain and endurance training.

    Having your liver turn body stores into glucose would also deplete glycogen stores, so your muscle endurance should plummet.

    The general rule of thumb for athletes is to eat carbs immediately after a workout to restore glycogen stores. Otherwise, little to no carbs to have your body metabolize body fat. And then loading protein before low activity and sleep periods to build/repair muscle tissue, while the body slowly burns body fat.

    tehmarken on
  • NODeNODe Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Am I right in thinking that I should be subtracting the amount of fibre from the amount of carbs to get the amount of "real" carbs?
    This is specifically in reference to nutritional info on thedailyplate if that makes any difference.

    NODe on
  • tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I don't know about that, maybe only if it's in one food. Fiber makes food harder to digest, so you get slower release of nutrients and your body uses more energy to digest it (something like celery has such a high fiber to carb ratio that you lose calories from eating it).

    So, maybe.

    tehmarken on
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    You don't count fiber because we don't have the enzymes to digest fiber.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    NODe wrote: »
    Am I right in thinking that I should be subtracting the amount of fibre from the amount of carbs to get the amount of "real" carbs?
    This is specifically in reference to nutritional info on thedailyplate if that makes any difference.

    I don't know the site you mean but that would be a radically weird way to do it. While cellulose is chemically a carbohydrate, any nutritional info I've ever read means 'carbohydrates digestible by humans' when they say 'carbohydrates'. I'm sure any FDA et al government body will legally define it that way.

    poshniallo on
    I figure I could take a bear.
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    poshniallo wrote: »
    NODe wrote: »
    Am I right in thinking that I should be subtracting the amount of fibre from the amount of carbs to get the amount of "real" carbs?
    This is specifically in reference to nutritional info on thedailyplate if that makes any difference.

    I don't know the site you mean but that would be a radically weird way to do it. While cellulose is chemically a carbohydrate, any nutritional info I've ever read means 'carbohydrates digestible by humans' when they say 'carbohydrates'. I'm sure any FDA et al government body will legally define it that way.


    No.

    If the label says '3g of carbs, 3g of fiber', then the food effectively haves 0g of carbs. Though, sometimes the label will already deduct the grams of fiber from the grams of carbs, causing confusing for all.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    poshniallo wrote: »
    NODe wrote: »
    Am I right in thinking that I should be subtracting the amount of fibre from the amount of carbs to get the amount of "real" carbs?
    This is specifically in reference to nutritional info on thedailyplate if that makes any difference.

    I don't know the site you mean but that would be a radically weird way to do it. While cellulose is chemically a carbohydrate, any nutritional info I've ever read means 'carbohydrates digestible by humans' when they say 'carbohydrates'. I'm sure any FDA et al government body will legally define it that way.


    No.

    If the label says '3g of carbs, 3g of fiber', then the food effectively haves 0g of carbs. Though, sometimes the label will already deduct the grams of fiber from the grams of carbs, causing confusing for all.

    You're right! And I'm right! Your way seems to be how they do it in the US.

    They don't do it that way in any of the countries I've lived.

    Seems like a nutty way to do it, but subtract away!

    poshniallo on
    I figure I could take a bear.
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited May 2010
    tehmarken wrote: »
    Ketosis seems only bad if you want to have endurance, since it is a way to continually cut body fat and muscle fat.

    From what I can tell, ketosis is when you take in virtually no glucose, so your body has to break down body fat and dietary fat to create glucose. This would be great for weight loss, but could be iffy for strength gain and endurance training.

    Fat cannot be converted into glucose. It is partially processed into ketones, which your muscles and organs then use for energy.

    Having your liver turn body stores into glucose would also deplete glycogen stores, so your muscle endurance should plummet.

    The general rule of thumb for athletes is to eat carbs immediately after a workout to restore glycogen stores. Otherwise, little to no carbs to have your body metabolize body fat. And then loading protein before low activity and sleep periods to build/repair muscle tissue, while the body slowly burns body fat.

    Only true for extremely serious athletes who participate in long high intensity sports. For everyone else ketones are quite enough.

    Contrary to popular belief, glucose is not necessary for your body to operate. It is just another energy source. In fact many tissues in your body use ketones much more efficiently than glucose (e.g. Heart muscles). Only small parts of the brain really need glucose but your liver can process that small amount from dietary protein.

    For endurance during low and medium intensity sports ketones are actually better because they provide a more steady supply of energy to muscles. So you don't get performance spikes associated with glucose.

    Perpetual on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Also with regards to cured meats such as bacon being bad for you because of sodium nitrite:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_nitrite#Health_Concerns

    It's perfectly fine.

    Perpetual on
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Perpetual wrote: »
    tehmarken wrote: »
    Ketosis seems only bad if you want to have endurance, since it is a way to continually cut body fat and muscle fat.

    From what I can tell, ketosis is when you take in virtually no glucose, so your body has to break down body fat and dietary fat to create glucose. This would be great for weight loss, but could be iffy for strength gain and endurance training.

    Fat cannot be converted into glucose. It is partially processed into ketones, which your muscles and organs then use for energy.

    Having your liver turn body stores into glucose would also deplete glycogen stores, so your muscle endurance should plummet.

    The general rule of thumb for athletes is to eat carbs immediately after a workout to restore glycogen stores. Otherwise, little to no carbs to have your body metabolize body fat. And then loading protein before low activity and sleep periods to build/repair muscle tissue, while the body slowly burns body fat.

    Only true for extremely serious athletes who participate in long high intensity sports. For everyone else ketones are quite enough.

    Contrary to popular belief, glucose is not necessary for your body to operate. It is just another energy source. In fact many tissues in your body use ketones much more efficiently than glucose (e.g. Heart muscles). Only small parts of the brain really need glucose but your liver can process that small amount from dietary protein.

    For endurance during low and medium intensity sports ketones are actually better because they provide a more steady supply of energy to muscles. So you don't get performance spikes associated with glucose.

    Under normal conditions the body keeps blood glucose pretty much the same no matter what diet you're on

    Paladin on
    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • YougottawannaYougottawanna Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I have a question about "total carbohydrates" as listed on nutrition labels. The SA OP had this:
    In many European countries, fiber is already deducted from the label’s total carb count. For example, imported Scandinavian bran crackers that list 3 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber do not contain zero grams of carbohydrate. If they followed U.S. labeling conventions, their labels would show 6 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber, since the European labels have already deducted the fiber from the total. This is also true of many imported chocolates.

    To make it even more confusing, an increasing number of U.S. labels also deduct fiber from total counts, too. Many nuts do this, but so do premium chocolates. For example, despite fact that most labels for walnuts usually list “3 grams total carbohydrate, 3 grams fiber” walnuts are not a zero carb treat! They contain about 2 grams of carbohydrate per ounce.

    Is there a way I can tell if the "total" carbohydrates listed are counting the fiber or not? For instance, I got one of those lettuce bags. It says there are three grams "total carbohydrates" per serving, and underneath that, it says there are two grams fiber and one gram sugar. In this case I assume that means 1g net carbohydrate per serving, but what if the label doesn't list how many grams sugar per serving? Is there a way to tell if the carbohydrates as listed in the nutrition info includes fiber or not?

    Yougottawanna on
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