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[Low-Carb Diets]: Now with awesome recipes on the first page!

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  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2010
    Yeah, I tried heavy cream but couldn't get used to the taste.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    for a low carb PWO shake coconut milk works great as a base.

    And if you're looking for a zero carb shake, I use water, NOW whey protein isolate, Leucine, unsweetened cocoa powder, and a few drops of stevia.

    The leucine is to stimulate insulin secretion in the absence of any sugar, it's a protein.

    geckahn on
  • TicaldfjamTicaldfjam Snoqualmie, WARegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I've started to include BCAAs (B.ranch C.hain A.mino A.cids) along with my protein shakes at all times now, especially post-workouts.

    On the subject of bread and for people stating "they can't do without it". Once you start removing breads from your diets your body will get used to it. Now, don't get me wrong, I'll have bread ONCE in a WHILE, and if its bread I have to have, I'll get the small, thin ones. I make sure not to eat much else with the bread with natural organic peanut butter, or peanut butter without HCFS when I’m on a budget since it is basically garbage or empty calories anyway.

    One scenario I have to share is if its 1st thing in the morning, when your body just wakes up from sleep, you can get away with a small amount of carbs (don't overdo it.) but as the day goes on you'll want to lower or eliminate your overall carb intake. I don't do this every time. Most of my mornings before work is plain organic oatmeal with small slices of banana (yes, I know bananas are no-nos but I cramp alot in my calf during running on the treadmill post workout so the potassium helps reduce that.) Three hours after that, some animal protein and eggs. Lunch time is lean meat and veggies. If I have to snack I’ll get a small amount of peanuts (I'm going to work on using almonds instead.) if I have feel hungry in between meals while I'm at work. Night time I'll have lean meat, green veggies like asparagus, yummy!, If I'm still feeling hungry I'll add sweet potatoes ( thanks geckhan!) to the meal that night.

    Do I cheat? Yes I do, but I don't overdo it. It will be one cheat meal for that particular day I use to cheat, and I make sure to bust my ass at the gym on my next visit. . When I have that once in a blue moon donut, its just one and thats it.

    If you maintain this 90% of the time in your lives, you’ll be happy and will get the discipline when you do cheat you’ll be able to control yourself with your new healthy lifestyle. Its basically trinity of food choices, cardiovascular and weightlifting exercise that will help your body become more fit and give yourself a better overall feeling.

    Ticaldfjam on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    when it comes to nuts, macadamias have the best nutrition profile. And they're super delicious.

    If you're near a trader joes you can get them there at a good price.

    geckahn on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    Uh, milk has a ton of carbs dude. 16-18 oz you're looking at around 30g of sugars.

    Replace that with unsweetened almond milk, or just water + peanut/almond butter for thickness.

    In the morning, that's kind of a good thing. The point of breaking your fast is to get your blood glucose back up so you're not zombiefied. Sugar gets into the blood quickly, so it's a good way to get you awake quickly. It's also absurdly high in protein (which is even more filling than fat) and calcium (which is apparently very slimming), as well as water (apparently, something in milk makes it more hydrating than plain water). That's also why it's really good after workouts.

    Scalfin on
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  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Uh, milk has a ton of carbs dude. 16-18 oz you're looking at around 30g of sugars.

    Replace that with unsweetened almond milk, or just water + peanut/almond butter for thickness.

    In the morning, that's kind of a good thing. The point of breaking your fast is to get your blood glucose back up so you're not zombiefied. Sugar gets into the blood quickly, so it's a good way to get you awake quickly. It's also absurdly high in protein (which is even more filling than fat) and calcium (which is apparently very slimming), as well as water (apparently, something in milk makes it more hydrating than plain water). That's also why it's really good after workouts.

    If you've been on low carb for more then a couple weeks, you're not going to be "zombified" in the morning unless you're a cafeine addict. Particularly if you're running in ketosis. Since you don't do low carb (from what i recall, correct me if I'm wrong), and are used to a life of blood sugar swings, you really aren't qualified to offer an educated opinion on the subject.

    That said, full fat milk can still be a good option post workout (due to the sugar and following insulin effects) if you're not trying to lean out. If you are, use coconut milk or almond milk in a shake, or go for the zero carb shake i posted earlier.

    For breakfast I'd stick with heavy cream or greek yogurt (or goat yogurt) thats full fat if you want dairy.

    geckahn on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited June 2010
    geckahn wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Uh, milk has a ton of carbs dude. 16-18 oz you're looking at around 30g of sugars.

    Replace that with unsweetened almond milk, or just water + peanut/almond butter for thickness.

    In the morning, that's kind of a good thing. The point of breaking your fast is to get your blood glucose back up so you're not zombiefied. Sugar gets into the blood quickly, so it's a good way to get you awake quickly. It's also absurdly high in protein (which is even more filling than fat) and calcium (which is apparently very slimming), as well as water (apparently, something in milk makes it more hydrating than plain water). That's also why it's really good after workouts.

    If you've been on low carb for more then a couple weeks, you're not going to be "zombified" in the morning unless you're a cafeine addict. Particularly if you're running in ketosis. Since you don't do low carb (from what i recall, correct me if I'm wrong), and are used to a life of blood sugar swings, you really aren't qualified to offer an educated opinion on the subject.

    That said, full fat milk can still be a good option post workout (due to the sugar and following insulin effects) if you're not trying to lean out. If you are, use coconut milk or almond milk in a shake, or go for the zero carb shake i posted earlier.

    For breakfast I'd stick with heavy cream or greek yogurt (or goat yogurt) thats full fat if you want dairy.

    Pretty much this. While we can all appreciate the fact that milk is a good source of calcium and protein, it doesn't have much place in a low-carb diet.

    Perpetual on
  • TicaldfjamTicaldfjam Snoqualmie, WARegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Question in regards to maintenance. Would one recommend 100% ketosis, 100%low carb, or a mixture of both variants?

    Ticaldfjam on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Ticaldfjam wrote: »
    Question in regards to maintenance. Would one recommend 100% ketosis, 100%low carb, or a mixture of both variants?

    For maintenance you have a couple of options that I would recommend. You can incorporate sweet potatoes/yams into your regular diet and see how your body reacts. If it's not affecting body fat and mood/energy in a negative way then stick to it.

    Another option is having a high carb meal post workout every 5-7 days (this is robb wolf's reccomendation, here). If you don't want to do the first option, or dont react well to it, I would definitely recommend doing this. Your best carb sources here are going to be sweet potatoes/yams, but if you want to do a cheat meal once a week then combining it with your one high carb meal per week could be a good option.

    As always try it out and see how your body reacts. Doing 100% ketosis for long periods of time is rough once you're under 10% BF. I had to do it to deal with GI issues for months straight, and it's not something I would really recommend.

    geckahn on
  • TicaldfjamTicaldfjam Snoqualmie, WARegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    geckahn wrote: »
    Ticaldfjam wrote: »
    Question in regards to maintenance. Would one recommend 100% ketosis, 100%low carb, or a mixture of both variants?

    For maintenance you have a couple of options that I would recommend. You can incorporate sweet potatoes/yams into your regular diet and see how your body reacts. If it's not affecting body fat and mood/energy in a negative way then stick to it.

    Another option is having a high carb meal post workout every 5-7 days (this is robb wolf's reccomendation, here). If you don't want to do the first option, or dont react well to it, I would definitely recommend doing this. Your best carb sources here are going to be sweet potatoes/yams, but if you want to do a cheat meal once a week then combining it with your one high carb meal per week could be a good option.

    As always try it out and see how your body reacts. Doing 100% ketosis for long periods of time is rough once you're under 10% BF. I had to do it to deal with GI issues for months straight, and it's not something I would really recommend.

    Awesome! Thanks geckahn. I've noticed on evenings (usually before 7PM) when I include a sweet patato in with the lean protein, green veggies meal, I'm satisfied and I'm satiated enough where my next meal is around breakfast. Also, my weight the next morning does'nt go up as with a carb heavy meal. Sometimes my weight sometimes drops a pound or two depending on the amount of sleep (7-9 hrs) I get that following morning. :)

    Ticaldfjam on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Don't focus so much on daily fluctuations in weight.

    In fact, forget about weight completely. It is a completely meaningless measure of anything. It doesn't say anything about your health. It doesn't say anything about your strength. It doesn't say anything about your endurance. All it does is encourage the development of a fixation on a simple number that consists of a lot of different variables, all of which are more important on their own than the total.

    I train lots of people for weight loss at my gym. At the beginning they are all telling me stuff like, "Oh Perpetual, I got great news... I lost 10 lbs over the past two weeks!" and they get disappointed when I tell them what I told you above. But then an interesting thing happens: once they stop obsessing about weight, they can more effectively focus on what really matters: losing fat tissue and gaining muscle tissue. Doing that often times does not decrease your weight (since muscle weighs more than fat, by volume), but it definitely makes you look slimmer, stronger, and more fit.

    The bottom line is, forget about weight. And if you absolutely must know it, then weigh yourself once a month at the gym. Throw away your scale at home. It's a worthless piece of garbage unless it can tell you your HDL/LDL, blood trigs, blood sugar levels, blood insulin levels, etc. which are the REAL measures of health.

    Perpetual on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    Perpetual wrote: »
    geckahn wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Uh, milk has a ton of carbs dude. 16-18 oz you're looking at around 30g of sugars.

    Replace that with unsweetened almond milk, or just water + peanut/almond butter for thickness.

    In the morning, that's kind of a good thing. The point of breaking your fast is to get your blood glucose back up so you're not zombiefied. Sugar gets into the blood quickly, so it's a good way to get you awake quickly. It's also absurdly high in protein (which is even more filling than fat) and calcium (which is apparently very slimming), as well as water (apparently, something in milk makes it more hydrating than plain water). That's also why it's really good after workouts.

    If you've been on low carb for more then a couple weeks, you're not going to be "zombified" in the morning unless you're a cafeine addict. Particularly if you're running in ketosis. Since you don't do low carb (from what i recall, correct me if I'm wrong), and are used to a life of blood sugar swings, you really aren't qualified to offer an educated opinion on the subject.

    That said, full fat milk can still be a good option post workout (due to the sugar and following insulin effects) if you're not trying to lean out. If you are, use coconut milk or almond milk in a shake, or go for the zero carb shake i posted earlier.

    For breakfast I'd stick with heavy cream or greek yogurt (or goat yogurt) thats full fat if you want dairy.

    Pretty much this. While we can all appreciate the fact that milk is a good source of calcium and protein, it doesn't have much place in a low-carb diet.

    The results of 12+ hours without food isn't exactly a "swing." By the morning, you'll be running on vapors, so you want to get food into your system as quickly as possible to start up. That means the first meal of the day needs something with a high GI to feed you while waiting for the fat and protein to be converted into energy. This is probably why breakfasts are so much more carb heavy worldwide (pretty much every culture uses some type of meal or bread, with the exception of places that consider pork to be in every food group). That's also why carbs are good after a workout, when ingesting sugary foods can replenish blood sugar faster than ingesting fatty foods or releasing stored calories.

    For the record, I'm doing a low-carb, low-fat diet. My main challenge thus far is that most fiber comes from carbs. Skim milk is free of fat and has a relatively small percentage of calories from carbs, so it is very good under this system.

    Scalfin on
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  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2010
    Low carb diets have to be high fat by definition. There is no such thing as a low-carb, low-fat diet unless you're eating protein powder by the scoop.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • AdrienAdrien Registered User
    edited June 2010
    And skim milk is the exact antithesis of low-carb.

    Adrien on
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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    Low carb diets have to be high fat by definition. There is no such thing as a low-carb, low-fat diet unless you're eating protein powder by the scoop.

    You don't say.


    This is fairly easy for me, as my mom doesn't eat red meat and I've picked up her New England taste for light fish (cod, haddock, halibut, scrod, tilapia, trout, et cetera), so all I have to do is watch my carbs.

    Scalfin on
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  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Low carb diets have to be high fat by definition. There is no such thing as a low-carb, low-fat diet unless you're eating protein powder by the scoop.

    You don't say.


    This is fairly easy for me, as my mom doesn't eat red meat and I've picked up her New England taste for light fish (cod, haddock, halibut, scrod, tilapia, trout, et cetera), so all I have to do is watch my carbs.

    Yes, I am aware of what "high protein" diets are. But they are typically not low-carb, low-fat diets. One of the links you linked describes a high protein diet as "20% fat, 35% protein, and around 50% carbs". So I don't really understand what you are trying to say. Either you're making shit up, or your definition of "low-carb" or "low-fat" is very different from ours (this is probably the case since you drink skim milk, which has a whopping 12g of sugar per serving).

    Within the context of this thread, low-carb means under 10% of total calories from carbs. So low-fat must mean the same thing. This means that 80% of your calories need to come from protein. Nothing wrong with that, but it significantly limits your food choices (much more so than a low-carb diet does) to a few typically expensive items (fish and lean meats) and I can't imagine that you're getting a lot of essential nutrients either since the vast majority of fruits and veggies are also out of the picture. With an actual low carb diet you can at least eat fatty veggies like avocados, and most nuts.

    What are you eating for breakfast, lunch, dinner?

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I think "life of blood sugar swings" is kind of a hard term for carbohydrate ingestion. Blood sugar swings both ways, and it doesn't actually swing very much. Only if you massively change your diet on a random basis will the liver perhaps not be able to keep up - for example, starving yourself.

    Paladin on
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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Low carb diets have to be high fat by definition. There is no such thing as a low-carb, low-fat diet unless you're eating protein powder by the scoop.

    You don't say.


    This is fairly easy for me, as my mom doesn't eat red meat and I've picked up her New England taste for light fish (cod, haddock, halibut, scrod, tilapia, trout, et cetera), so all I have to do is watch my carbs.

    Yes, I am aware of what "high protein" diets are. But they are typically not low-carb, low-fat diets. One of the links you linked describes a high protein diet as "20% fat, 35% protein, and around 50% carbs". So I don't really understand what you are trying to say. Either you're making shit up, or your definition of "low-carb" or "low-fat" is very different from ours (this is probably the case since you drink skim milk, which has a whopping 12g of sugar per serving).

    Within the context of this thread, low-carb means under 10% of total calories from carbs. So low-fat must mean the same thing. This means that 80% of your calories need to come from protein. Nothing wrong with that, but it significantly limits your food choices (much more so than a low-carb diet does) to a few typically expensive items (fish and lean meats) and I can't imagine that you're getting a lot of essential nutrients either since the vast majority of fruits and veggies are also out of the picture. With an actual low carb diet you can at least eat fatty veggies like avocados, and most nuts.

    What are you eating for breakfast, lunch, dinner?

    Yes, different systems use different definitions. Your system defines "low" as "almost none." My system uses "low" to mean "lower than what anyone outside this diet will ever eat." For breakfast, I have eggs with a glass of orange juice. For lunch, leftovers or turkey breast in a whole wheat wrap with romaine and mustard. For dinner, one of the fish I mentioned or chicken (probably breast) with a bit of rice or a latke and a large salad (romain lettuce, apple or asian pear, nuts, and light honey mustard). I'd eat beans instead of rice, but my mom doesn't like beans and I'm home for the summer. I also need to eat a wider variety of vegetables and some fruit, as I know I can't get everything even from leafy greens (let alone fruits like the avocado).

    Scalfin on
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  • BraincowBraincow Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    So what you really mean to say is that you are eating a moderate carb diet (less than 150g/day) in the parlance of this thread

    Braincow on
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  • Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2010
    It doesn't really matter either way. The bottom line is that if you're on an actual low-carb diet, you cannot drink skim milk except for after a strenuous workout.

    Protein Shakes on
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Well, if my mom met the following criteria... I'd be in favor if waterboarding her.
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    It doesn't really matter either way. The bottom line is that if you're on an actual low-carb diet, you cannot drink skim milk except for after a strenuous workout.

    I put some in my eggs (along with too much of the sharpest cheddar I can find), have been thinking of drinking it instead of orange juice, and am thinking of drinking some before I go to sleep because I suspect that I'm doing my crunches too late to use the protein from dinner. I'm drinking 1%, but skim has an even higher protein percentage (38%, mostly whey), so I would switch if I wasn't using my parent's coffee supply.

    I've actually checked, and it seems that a serving of skim has the same number of carbs as a serving of avocado. Yes, it has a higher percentage (54%), but, like spinach (48%) and romaine (63%), you're never going to consume that much.

    Scalfin on
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  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    and then you wonder, why the fuck wouldnt I just drink full fat milk?

    Fat is the prime energy source on a low carb diet. A low carb and low fat diet could work while rapid weight loss is occurring, but is a total non option once you're at maintenance levels.

    I am really not a big fan of your advice here buddy. Don't you think it would be more appropriate in a diet thread of your creation?

    geckahn on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I've actually checked, and it seems that a serving of skim has the same number of carbs as a serving of avocado. Yes, it has a higher percentage (54%), but, like spinach (48%) and romaine (63%), you're never going to consume that much.

    There are qualitative differences. The blood sugar spike from a glass of milk is going to be much higher then an avocado. Theres more to it then "grams of carbs".

    geckahn on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    geckahn wrote: »
    and then you wonder, why the fuck wouldnt I just drink full fat milk?

    Fat is the prime energy source on a low carb diet. A low carb and low fat diet could work while rapid weight loss is occurring, but is a total non option once you're at maintenance levels.

    I am really not a big fan of your advice here buddy. Don't you think it would be more appropriate in a diet thread of your creation?

    Because you want the carbs as a patch job rather than the long-term satiation of fats and proteins. The milk in the morning is basically a bit of tape to keep you together until the fat takes hold. Of course, you'd want whole milk under your system, but saying that milk in the morning is bad because it has carbs ignores the use of the milk.
    Carbs do have a purpose: they get into the bloodstream quickly. That means that a small number of carbs can do the work of much more fat when you need to fill a gap. In the morning, your body should have depleted its most readily available stores. After a workout, your body has depleted all its free calories and is trying to get calories into the bloodstream (I know this isn't quite the right terminology, but bear with me). In both cases, you'll eat until a sufficient amount gets into your system, so you'll eat a lot less if your calories come from something that gets into your system quickly. That's also why marathon runners eat fig newtons right before a race, as the carbs in the breading followed by the carbs in the figs are able to keep them energized until the body's fat mobilization starts to take effect.

    I guess the point is that you don't need all that many carbs, just properly administered carbs. In your case, that means that the 10% of calories you eat from carbs should be split between the morning and right after a workout.

    Scalfin on
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  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    wallaka wrote: »
    Any tips on making a low carb desert out of whipping cream

    http://genaw.com/lowcarb/cream_cheese_clouds.html

    Also, a scoop of chocolate protein powder blended with 4 oz. whipping cream and ice makes something that tastes damned close to a Frosty.

    I've discovered that whipping cream, ice, some sweetener, and some amount of sugar free jello mix creates something pretty tasty

    override367 on
  • Uncle_JohnUncle_John Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Last night I got buzzed on wodka and diet soda, and this morning I woke up with the weirdest hangover. I felt relatively fine, but when I got out of bed and stood up I instantly started sweating like a motherfucker en threw up. My stomach felt horrible. I have literally never vomited from alcohol. Normally I rarely even get hungover. This definatly felt like an unnatural hangover, as far as they exist.

    Also, I weighed myself after a week of low carbing today, and I lost 3 kilograms. Is this water weight? Is this healthy? I was doing a low fat diet before this, by which I already lost 40 kilograms, so I have some doubts.

    I find both of these developments a bit disturbing.

    Uncle_John on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    Last night I got buzzed on wodka and diet soda, and this morning I woke up with the weirdest hangover. I felt relatively fine, but when I got out of bed and stood up I instantly started sweating like a motherfucker en threw up. My stomach felt horrible. I have literally never vomited from alcohol. Normally I rarely even get hungover. This definatly felt like an unnatural hangover, as far as they exist.

    Also, I weighed myself after a week of low carbing today, and I lost 3 kilograms. Is this water weight? Is this healthy? I was doing a low fat diet before this, by which I already lost 40 kilograms, so I have some doubts.

    I find both of these developments a bit disturbing.

    That sounds like postural hypotension. I get that whenever I'm thirsty, so it can come with the type of dehydration caused by alcohol. Get some fluids.

    Scalfin on
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  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    i just spent 3.5 weeks in europe eating bread bread bread bread
    plus beer beer wine wine

    i need some carb detox time

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
    poo
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    Also, I weighed myself after a week of low carbing today, and I lost 3 kilograms. Is this water weight? Is this healthy? I was doing a low fat diet before this, by which I already lost 40 kilograms, so I have some doubts.

    Yeah, its water weight loss. You hold less water when on low carb.

    geckahn on
  • Uncle_JohnUncle_John Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    Last night I got buzzed on wodka and diet soda, and this morning I woke up with the weirdest hangover. I felt relatively fine, but when I got out of bed and stood up I instantly started sweating like a motherfucker en threw up. My stomach felt horrible. I have literally never vomited from alcohol. Normally I rarely even get hungover. This definatly felt like an unnatural hangover, as far as they exist.

    Also, I weighed myself after a week of low carbing today, and I lost 3 kilograms. Is this water weight? Is this healthy? I was doing a low fat diet before this, by which I already lost 40 kilograms, so I have some doubts.

    I find both of these developments a bit disturbing.

    That sounds like postural hypotension. I get that whenever I'm thirsty, so it can come with the type of dehydration caused by alcohol. Get some fluids.


    Yeah I thought I knew what i was like to be thirsty but goddamn was I thirsty this morning. I feel relatively fine now by the way.

    I'm a 21 year old college student and without alcohol I wouldn't have a social life. I need to drink alcohol but the way I felt this morning makes the whole low carb thing not worth it, which is a shame because I love all the other aspects of it. Do you think it will be better next time I just drink more water before, during and after drinking alcohol?

    Also, I came across a forum where someone claimed that you get more hungover when on low carbs because the liver is "busy" with ketosis process. Any truth to this?

    Uncle_John on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I've actually checked, and it seems that a serving of skim has the same number of carbs as a serving of avocado. Yes, it has a higher percentage (54%), but, like spinach (48%) and romaine (63%), you're never going to consume that much.

    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1843/2

    Avocado has 13g of carbs, 10g of those is fiber, which does not count towards your carb total.

    Skim milk as 12g of carbs, all 12g of those is sugar.

    Perpetual on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    So I started making some chicken soup. Since the skin gets really soggy when you make braise it, I thought, "Hmm... why not just fry up the chicken skin as if it was bacon?"

    And so I did.

    Has anyone else ever tried this?

    Schrodinger on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited June 2010
    So I started making some chicken soup. Since the skin gets really soggy when you make braise it, I thought, "Hmm... why not just fry up the chicken skin as if it was bacon?"

    And so I did.

    Has anyone else ever tried this?

    It's called crackling, with the chicken variant being called "gribenes." Honestly, it was the most horrific food I'd ever heard of until my grandmother told me her family usually ate bowls of sour cream as a desert when she was a girl (I seem to recall her saying that they'd put in slices of banana, but that may be because that's what I do with greek yogurt).

    Scalfin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Does anyone have any good methods for making deep fry batter without things full of carbs?

    I mean I have no experience frying things or much cooking, I'd like to make maybe some low carb onion rings or general tso's chicken (after much mad science I got a sauce that should be appropriate)

    override367 on
  • HamurabiHamurabi MiamiRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    So how binary is ketogenesis? Is it after a certain amount of time has elapse where I haven't had any carbs that my metabolism shifts to using these ketone body things for energy? Will munching on one or two unavoidable (due to eating out with company, etc) carb sources throw it all out of whack and "reset the timer?"

    Hamurabi on
  • OrganichuOrganichu jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    it's very doable to do high protein, low everything else, without nutritional supplements

    it's just very tedious and unattractive

    Organichu on
  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Organichu wrote: »
    it's very doable to do high protein, low everything else, without nutritional supplements

    it's just very tedious and unattractive

    low-carb already restricts choices quite a bit. low-carb AND low-fat would be pretty mundane.

    Perpetual on
  • OrganichuOrganichu jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    it's intensely mundane. lyle mcdonald's board offers up a variety of slightly different ways of preparing proteins- shrimp, chicken tits, etc.

    Organichu on
  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    I'm a 21 year old college student and without alcohol I wouldn't have a social life. I need to drink alcohol

    Uh... no you don't? This is a terrible mentality. It will only lead to trouble. Just pointing out that you may want to think about that statement, don't want to turn this thread into a discussion about it.
    but the way I felt this morning makes the whole low carb thing not worth it, which is a shame because I love all the other aspects of it. Do you think it will be better next time I just drink more water before, during and after drinking alcohol?

    Also, I came across a forum where someone claimed that you get more hungover when on low carbs because the liver is "busy" with ketosis process. Any truth to this?

    Possibly, but what you had sounds like severe dehydration. Diet coke (and regular coke) has salt, which throws off your electrolyte levels (unless balanced with sufficient water). It also has caffeine which makes you lose water. Alcohol also makes you lose water.

    Solution? Drink water. Also, the cure for a hangover is bacon and eggs... with a glass of water or two.

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • MumblyfishMumblyfish Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    I'm a 21 year old college student and without alcohol I wouldn't have a social life. I need to drink alcohol
    Uh... no you don't? This is a terrible mentality. It will only lead to trouble. Just pointing out that you may want to think about that statement, don't want to turn this thread into a discussion about it.
    Yeah, really. You don't need alcohol for social reasons. Your friends will mock you on occasion for being teetotal - as they will if you do anything for your health - but they'll quickly get over it. Give it a couple of weeks and people will stop giving a shit about what you are or are not drinking.
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    Also, I came across a forum where someone claimed that you get more hungover when on low carbs because the liver is "busy" with ketosis process. Any truth to this?
    There is no truth in this. Quite the opposite, in fact. To the liver, digesting alcohols takes priority over everything else - alcohol consumption saturates the liver. Lipolysis is postponed until the alcohol is digested.

    So no, you don't get more hungover because your liver is busy dealing with fatty acids. Rather, your weight loss is slowed down because your liver is dealing with alcohol.

    Seems like it's time for an over-simplified guide to hangovers.
    Uncle_John wrote: »
    but the way I felt this morning makes the whole low carb thing not worth it, which is a shame because I love all the other aspects of it. Do you think it will be better next time I just drink more water before, during and after drinking alcohol?
    Ethanol causes dehydration; it does this by increasing the rate at which you produce urine. This causes fluids in your brain-pan to be less plentiful. This decreases the water potential in the blood and fluid surrounding your brain. So, water moves out of your brain cells, into the bloodstream to maintain equilibrium. Your brain cells become shrivelled or flaccid, which causes pain and lethargy.

    I have been told - and it is my experience that - high-fat diets increase your need for water, and most experience symptoms similar to a hangover while adapting to the diet. I'm not entirely certain why, and I won't bore you with theory-crafting. If high-fat diets decrease the water potential of the blood similar to ethanol, they would exacerbate the effects of a hangover. However, there's no reason to believe this to be the case - from my limited understanding, that wouldn't make much sense.

    There are no proven remedies for a hangover, other than rehydrating and letting osmosis slowly work its magic. Oh, and not drinking so goddamned much.

    Mumblyfish on
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