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[Low-Carb Diets]: Now with awesome recipes on the first page!

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  • durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I'd say the main substantiated findings about choosing food are digestion-related. If you get the runs after going to Taco Bell, you might want to stop.

    Also, this Skeptoid podcast/article is an interesting examination of food, centering mostly around the claim that fast food is just solidly bad for you instead of simply more caloric than a meal you would prepare for yourself.

    durandal4532 on
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  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Anyway, I am lowering my carb intake, but not for the sake of weight loss, so I'm not triggering ketosis. But I am trying to improve digestion and overall health. My main criticism of atkins has always been "How do Asian people stay skinny with all that rice?" By shifting the goal and the mindset a little, it makes a bit more sense to me.

    I've made progress on high carb low calorie diets.

    I've made progress fumbling through exercise routines.

    I've made tremendous progress doing absolutely no physical activity and going low carb (yes yes I know, but I wanted to be absolutely sure it was the diet and not the exercise that was the culprit, also it was tough exercising at 277)

    Edit: wait what rice doesn't screw you up that bad?

    Anyone have a link on this? If I could have chinese food with rice it would make me very happy

    override367 on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I need to preface that by saying that we're in different boats. You're trying to lose weight by tricking your body into starvation mode, I'm not. And yeah, it has to be white (People in Asia don't really eat brown rice, and whole grains are apparently bad for you).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

    This guy goes on about how sugar and rice are fundamentally different.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatulence

    Certain spices have been reported to counteract the production of intestinal gas, most notably the closely related cumin, coriander, caraway and others such as ajwain, turmeric, asafoetida (Hing), epazote, and kombu kelp (a Japanese seaweed). Most starches, including potatoes, corn, noodles, and wheat, produce gas as they are broken down in the large intestine. Rice is the only starch that does not cause gas.[8] The amount of water-soluble oligosaccharide in beans that may contribute to production of intestinal gas is reputed to be reduced by a long period of soaking followed by boiling, but at a cost of also leaching out other water-soluble nutrients.[citation needed] Also, intestinal gas can be reduced by fermenting the beans, and making them less gas-inducing, and/or by cooking them in the liquor from a previous batch. Some legumes also stand up to prolonged cooking, which can help break down the oligosaccharides into simple sugars. On the other hand, fermented bean products such as miso are less likely to produce as much intestinal gas. Fermentative lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum reduce flatulence in human intestinal tract.[9]

    The second article is relevant regarding the "Carbs causes gas causes GERD" article that Geckham posted earlier. The article suggests that a Paleo diet might be good, though I'm skeptical, because a lot of low carb vegetables (i.e., broccoli) will also cause gas.

    With that said, I hardly eat any sugar including fruit, used to eat lots of rice and wheat, don't eat any salads, I don't exercise at all, and never had much troubles with weight.

    Apparently a lot of people in Asia save rice for the end of the meal when in case you're still hungry, so I'm cutting back on rice. And I'm also trying to cut back on wheat products as much as possible. Also, I find it interesting that Americans tend to like raw veggies and cooked meats, where as Asians often do the opposite.

    Oh yeah, one of my friends has a nutritionist who got her hooked on the blood type diet. It's basically astrology meets diet plan disguised as science. She says that she's AB positive, which means that she's only allowed to eat turkey and lamb. First, that makes zero sense, because there isn't a culture anywhere on Earth that only eats turkey and lamb. Second, for a diet plan that's as hyper specific enough to recommend those two meats and those two meats alone, "turkey" and "lamb" is pretty vague. Which parts? The organ meats? The bones? White meat? Dark meat? The head? The feet? etc. I doubt that the guy did any real testing. It sounds like he just made a laundry list of foods that he thinks are healthy, and went with it.

    The other day, she told me that she had a hard time cutting sugar from her diet, because ABs are predisposed to like sugar. Reminds me of the Dave Chapelle line. "I used to think I liked fried chicken because it was delicious, but apparently I have a genetic predisposition."

    Schrodinger on
  • tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Cooked rice is lower density of energy than bread, sugar, candy, or other forms of cooked/process carbohydrates. That's one of the main reasons a rice heavy diet doesn't make people obese. Rice is cooked with water, and it soaks up a ton of it.

    At most Chinese restaurants around the world, you get fried rice. Which doesn't have as much water and is FRIED, which adds more calories to it.

    And Schrodinger:
    Apparently a lot of people in Asia save rice for the end of the meal when in case you're still hungry, so I'm cutting back on rice. And I'm also trying to cut back on wheat products as much as possible. Also, I find it interesting that Americans tend to like raw veggies and cooked meats, where as Asians often do the opposite.

    Man, what are you talking about? Raw meat is incredibly rare in Asia, people don't go around eating sushi for every meal. And they don't have a secret method of saving rice just as a filler at the end of a meal.
    A typical Japanese meal is (by volume, not calories) about 4 parts rice, 3 parts veggies, and 2 parts protein (meat, fish, beans, or eggs).

    From my observations, I'd have to say that Japanese people are generally so thin because they eat mainly rice (low calorie density but filling), lots of vegetables (also low calorie density and filling), and a rather small amount of fat.

    tehmarken on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    So I'm working on a news article on how Vietnamese people adjust to American diets in regards to diabetes.

    Apparently, Vietnamese physiology really can't handle sugar well. Like, at all.

    In the early 90s, Vietnam's sugar consumption was fairly stable at 15 pounds per person per year. Then the soft drink industry came along. By 1995, consumption rose to 20 pounds. Of course, this was still far less than the world average (44 pounds), and less than Thailand, Philippines, and Malaysia (60 pounds).

    Today, diabetes is now one of the fastest growing diseases in America, from 4.4% in 2003 to 7.3% in 2008. The number is expected to double in 10 years. Did sugar consumption go up? Yes. Did it go up by a lot? No. It's now up to 40 pounds, which is still far less than the world average in 1995, and way less than the and 150-170 pounds consumed in the US today.

    Of course, it could be that 10% of the population is eating all of the extra sugar, and the other 90% is eating none of the extra sugar. Still, that's pretty scary.

    Schrodinger on
  • DisrupterDisrupter Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    So I want to go ahead and go low carb. My problem is three fold...

    I dont know where to begin in order to stock my house with supplies I need, like carbquick or almond flower, or truvia etc. I also dont know what items i SHOULD have.

    I see lots of recipees on here which seem darned good, but what are quick meal options other then salad after salad? Are there any frozen dinner type things that are low carb? Sometimes Im fricken exhausted when I get home from work and simply cant cook.

    My wife wants to diet too... (shes tiny, but whatever helps her be happy...) but shes not going low carb. Are most meals tastey enough and healthy enough or will I constantly be cooking for 1?

    I guess the 4th issue is, how many carbs do I need to limit myself to? Like a salad and soup at panera is like a combined 20 carbs, which seems high. Is it too high to eat for lunch while maintaining a low carb diet?

    Disrupter on
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  • MumblyfishMumblyfish Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I dont know where to begin in order to stock my house with supplies I need, like carbquick or almond flower, or truvia etc. I also dont know what items i SHOULD have.
    Personally, I found that carbohydrate and starch substitutes didn't help. The best way to stop craving carbohydrates is to stop eating carbohydrates, and that includes stuff that pretends to be carbohydrates. For the record, Carbquik tastes terrible and it's goddamned expensive. That's money that could be better spent on meat, cheese and eggs.

    I always enjoyed making chocolates and sweets, and adapted some of my favourite recipes to low-carb alternatives. While it was certainly fun to eat high fat, high protein chocolate treats, it triggered cravings for sweet things, and I caved to those more often than I'd like to admit. I've since cut sweets out of my diet, and I just don't want them any more. All I get now is meat cravings. I'm cool with that.

    Sucralose is a cheap sweetener that you can find anywhere, but it usually comes bulked with maltodextrin, a digestible (but low-density and low glycaemic impact) carbohydrate. It's not worth worrying about unless you're adding sweetener to everything. Other than that, I would stay away from carb substitutes marketed at fatties who just can't let go.
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I see lots of recipees on here which seem darned good, but what are quick meal options other then salad after salad?
    Hahaha. Salad? Fuck salads. Most vegetables are a decent side-dish if you want to add flavour to your main course, but they're not a meal in themselves.

    Eggs are quick and easy to prepare. If you're ever too lazy to cook an egg dish, you have problems beyond obesity. Deli meats are numerous and can all be eaten cold. Cheeses and nuts can be eaten as they are. A lot of meats don't need any preparation beyond being slapped in an oven for half an hour.
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I guess the 4th issue is, how many carbs do I need to limit myself to? Like a salad and soup at panera is like a combined 20 carbs, which seems high. Is it too high to eat for lunch while maintaining a low carb diet?
    See above: Salad and soup is a terrible lunch. As for carbohydrate count, you'll need to work that out yourself. Everyone is insulin resistant to different degrees. I know that <30g a day is widely accepted and seems to work for most.

    If memory serves, a year ago I was highly skeptical of high-fat diets, and even tried my damnedest to argue against them on this forum. B-b-but cardiovascular diseeeeease! Now, I'm down to 64kg and 11% body fat. I look and feel healthier than I have ever been. Thanks, low-carb!

    Mumblyfish on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Disrupter wrote: »
    So I want to go ahead and go low carb. My problem is three fold...

    I dont know where to begin in order to stock my house with supplies I need, like carbquick or almond flower, or truvia etc. I also dont know what items i SHOULD have.

    I see lots of recipees on here which seem darned good, but what are quick meal options other then salad after salad? Are there any frozen dinner type things that are low carb? Sometimes Im fricken exhausted when I get home from work and simply cant cook.

    My wife wants to diet too... (shes tiny, but whatever helps her be happy...) but shes not going low carb. Are most meals tastey enough and healthy enough or will I constantly be cooking for 1?

    I guess the 4th issue is, how many carbs do I need to limit myself to? Like a salad and soup at panera is like a combined 20 carbs, which seems high. Is it too high to eat for lunch while maintaining a low carb diet?

    As an Asian person who will never give up rice, I recommend that you just start by cutting out sugar, and cutting down on wheat, corn, and soy products. Corn is cheap and tasty, but you body has a really hard time digesting it. Only use wheat if you're going to make a homemade starter, in order to break down the phytic acid. Otherwise, it's going to lead to mineral loss. That applies double for whole grains.

    The last time I might rice, I combined a half stick of butter, a 1 cup of rice, and a 28 oz jar of crushed tomato and fried it up together. All that butter helps you get full a lot faster than you would with plain rice, and the tomatoes adds some vitamins and flavors. There's probably a bit of sugar in the tomatoes themselves, but at least it still maintains all the fiber, unlike orange juice.

    If you can go low carb, then you'll have to cut out sugar anyway. But if you can't cut out sugar, then you will never manage low carb. So focus on the biggest and most addictive problem first, and you will probably lose a lot of weight just from that. From there, you can decide whether or not it's necessary to go fully low carb in ketosis mode. If you have to, then fine, you already did the hard part. If not, then great. Stay where you are and be happy.

    Schrodinger on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Mumblyfish wrote: »
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I see lots of recipees on here which seem darned good, but what are quick meal options other then salad after salad?
    Hahaha. Salad? Fuck salads. Most vegetables are a decent side-dish if you want to add flavour to your main course, but they're not a meal in themselves.

    I have eaten maybe two salads in the past 5 years. And the last one was because my friend pressured me into it.

    I prefer cook/roasted vegetables. It also breaks down the cellulose, which makes it easier to digest. Also, roast them in fat.

    One big difference now is that I try to avoid throwing fat away. The other day, I made some bacon for a friend of mine, and I used the left over fat to fry up the rice.

    Schrodinger on
  • DisrupterDisrupter Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    So what do you guys suggest for common every day lunches at work? Deli meat is fine, but...do you just wrap it around some cheese and eat it? Deli meat to me = sandwhich...so I dont know how to do it without bread. I used to wrap cheese and meat around a pickle for a quick snack. But im not sure that will satisfy me for a lunch. Perhaps 2-3 of those?

    As for cutting sugar. The only sugar intake i get regularly is pop, which I have reduced a bunch by switching to G2 (or the generic, Aldi version N2) and hopefully can eventually switch to water completely. I get bad migrains and diet pop acts as a trigger so I cant use it.

    Really my main cravings involve meat. The carbs I crave are usually potato based and occasionaly I just want some damned bread. Cutting sugar shouldnt be too hard for me because i fricken love sour stuff and creamy stuff. So when I really crave a desert item I can grab some lemons and just eat them and occupy myself for a good while. I also tend to have a can of wipped cream and just spray a serving or two in a bowl and slowly eat it for a bit. (20-40 calories, 1-2 carbs)

    My problem is putting together a good meal on a regular basis and not using carbs. I can cook my steak or chicken, get some broccolli and cheese on the side and its great. But it also begs for a 2nd side which would normally be a potato or perhaps some bread item. And it also only takes care of like 1-2 meals a week, leaving like 12 more.

    Disrupter on
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  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Low-carb wraps and tortillas are your best friends, along with chorizo and sriracha. Sriracha makes every meal better, and it doesn't take much. Lunch: cook beforehand. Usually I cook a big bunch of food on Sunday afternoon (a roast, a couple chickens, etc) and take that with me. I will switch it up with deli meat and low-carb wraps; I get tired of the same thing every day. I'd take a look at the Something Awful low-carb thread. It has a lot of good resources, and Linda's Low Carb has a ton of recipes, but doesn't include Heroin Wings, one of the best. Though I use boneless thighs or breasts, wings are too much work for me. I do put more parmesan in mine as well, and a few more spices like garlic powder. They are fantastic.

    I'll eat potatoes every once in a while, but my main craving is pizza. I'll usually put half a bag of shredded cheese in a small skillet and get it brown, and put sausage and pepperoni on it when it's still gooey on top. Sometimes I'll make an egg or riced cauliflower crust, but I'm usually too lazy.

    I've fallen off the wagon lately, but haven't gained any weight back. I'm down to 175 pounds from 200 when I started low-carb in July until I started eating more and more in late November. Can't resist Grandma's holiday cooking.

    After New Year's I'm starting back low-carb, I'm not quite where I want to be yet. Though I honestly look like a different person from when I was at my heaviest...I look at old pictures now and just have to shake my head.

    wallaka on
  • AdrienAdrien Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Mumblyfish wrote: »
    meat, cheese and eggs

    Adrien on
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  • ShanadeusShanadeus Registered User
    edited December 2010
    I saw this really awesome cauliflower pizza on the internets that I thiink was completely vegetarian but have no idea how to make one.

    Does anyone know what pizza recipe I'm talking about?

    Shanadeus on
  • DisrupterDisrupter Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I made hot wings last night, they were awesome. Perhaps this low carb fad will get me into cooking a bit more. Everytime I "try" something and it works, makes me want to try so much more.

    http://www.examiner.com/low-carb-in-national/cauliflower-pizza-crust-worth-its-wow-gold

    This is my next mission. We might go out tonight, but if not, Im making this.

    Disrupter on
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  • ShanadeusShanadeus Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I made hot wings last night, they were awesome. Perhaps this low carb fad will get me into cooking a bit more. Everytime I "try" something and it works, makes me want to try so much more.

    http://www.examiner.com/low-carb-in-national/cauliflower-pizza-crust-worth-its-wow-gold

    This is my next mission. We might go out tonight, but if not, Im making this.

    Oh that's the pizza I'm talking about, looks so darn delicious.

    Shanadeus on
  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    i was doing this mostly pretty well for 1.5 years ish and the results had been good, but i fell off the wagon a lot... since probably may, now that i'm working and time is less and i get lazy and end up eating out

    i need to figure out things i can cook en masse ahead of time

    i miss school

    i've also gained that fat back that i lost before

    gotta reveeeerse

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
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  • agentk13agentk13 __BANNED USERS
    edited December 2010
    Did any of you see today's NYT review of Taubes' new book in the science section?
    How to account for the fact that in virtually all head-to-head comparisons of various diet plans, the average long-term results have invariably been quite similar — mediocre all around? The party line holds that backsliding is universal. Mr. Taubes makes much of the addictive effect of carbohydrates: once you taste them you never forget them.

    But those studies report group outcomes. Every plan has its own rare, shining success stories as well. Sometime, a diet just clicks.

    agentk13 on
  • NaromNarom Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(

    Narom on
    <cursive>Narom</cursive>
  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Shanadeus wrote: »
    Disrupter wrote: »
    I made hot wings last night, they were awesome. Perhaps this low carb fad will get me into cooking a bit more. Everytime I "try" something and it works, makes me want to try so much more.

    http://www.examiner.com/low-carb-in-national/cauliflower-pizza-crust-worth-its-wow-gold

    This is my next mission. We might go out tonight, but if not, Im making this.

    Oh that's the pizza I'm talking about, looks so darn delicious.

    I've become a pretty big fan of carbquick pizza crust.

    If you brush it with olive oil and use some garlic powder and whatnot the taste isn't bad and it has a good texture - you can top it with all sorts of things.

    Mainly bacon

    override367 on
  • cyphrcyphr Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(
    Almond milk! I like the Almond Breeze brand. Get the unsweetened kind and put a few drops of liquid artificial sweetener in your glass and it's absolutely delicious. They even have an unsweetened chocolate variety that tastes just like regular chocolate milk after you sweeten it.

    cyphr on
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  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    cyphr wrote: »
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(
    Almond milk! I like the Almond Breeze brand. Get the unsweetened kind and put a few drops of liquid artificial sweetener in your glass and it's absolutely delicious. They even have an unsweetened chocolate variety that tastes just like regular chocolate milk after you sweeten it.

    Coconut milk is pretty good too, but ymmv. I'm still experimenting with various combinations of cream, almond milk, coconut milk, carb-free chocolate syrup, and sweetener to find what is bestest

    override367 on
  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(

    Frankly, you shouldn't drink calories. It's really easy to end up consuming way more than you think you are that way.

    But as far as milk goes, look for lactose-free milk. It's for lactose intolerant people, so they basically take out all the sugar (lactose). Double-check the label, though, 'cause they might add in a different kind of sugar. There'a a brand available at my local/regional supermarket chain called Mootopia; it's lactose-free with no added sugar and extra protein. I think it's a store brand, but you might be able to find something similar where you live.

    jimb213 on
  • agentk13agentk13 __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2011
    jimb213 wrote: »
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(

    Frankly, you shouldn't drink calories. It's really easy to end up consuming way more than you think you are that way.

    But as far as milk goes, look for lactose-free milk. It's for lactose intolerant people, so they basically take out all the sugar (lactose). Double-check the label, though, 'cause they might add in a different kind of sugar. There'a a brand available at my local/regional supermarket chain called Mootopia; it's lactose-free with no added sugar and extra protein. I think it's a store brand, but you might be able to find something similar where you live.

    That depends on how someone overeats. If it's spread out, milk is equivalent to other calorie sources. If it's in single sittings, all that water will make you feel full faster (that's why drinking water before a meal works, and there was some research out two or three years back showing that mass is what makes you feel full).

    2% milk has a 1:1:1 calorie ratio.

    agentk13 on
  • jimb213jimb213 Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    agentk13 wrote: »
    jimb213 wrote: »
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(

    Frankly, you shouldn't drink calories. It's really easy to end up consuming way more than you think you are that way.

    But as far as milk goes, look for lactose-free milk. It's for lactose intolerant people, so they basically take out all the sugar (lactose). Double-check the label, though, 'cause they might add in a different kind of sugar. There'a a brand available at my local/regional supermarket chain called Mootopia; it's lactose-free with no added sugar and extra protein. I think it's a store brand, but you might be able to find something similar where you live.

    That depends on how someone overeats. If it's spread out, milk is equivalent to other calorie sources. If it's in single sittings, all that water will make you feel full faster (that's why drinking water before a meal works, and there was some research out two or three years back showing that mass is what makes you feel full).

    2% milk has a 1:1:1 calorie ratio.

    Yeah, I was being a little too simplistic with "[never] drink calories," and I also agree that milk is probably the best liquid-with-calories to drink. I still think it's a good rule of thumb to follow, and makes getting your diet organized easier.

    jimb213 on
  • agentk13agentk13 __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2011
    jimb213 wrote: »
    agentk13 wrote: »
    jimb213 wrote: »
    Narom wrote: »
    So, I'm trying to cut sugar out of my diet as much as possible, and I'm going to try eating better in general too. Unfortunately, I really like milk, and I noticed that it's got a fair amount of sugar in it. I drink a lot of it regularly, so that's kind of a problem. Is there anything I can realistically do about that? I know on the first page it was suggested that milk in recipes could be replaced with heavy cream (diluted with water). What about milk alternatives, or just healthy beverages in general? I'm just a little anxious about the possibility of having to give up my delicious milk :(

    Frankly, you shouldn't drink calories. It's really easy to end up consuming way more than you think you are that way.

    But as far as milk goes, look for lactose-free milk. It's for lactose intolerant people, so they basically take out all the sugar (lactose). Double-check the label, though, 'cause they might add in a different kind of sugar. There'a a brand available at my local/regional supermarket chain called Mootopia; it's lactose-free with no added sugar and extra protein. I think it's a store brand, but you might be able to find something similar where you live.

    That depends on how someone overeats. If it's spread out, milk is equivalent to other calorie sources. If it's in single sittings, all that water will make you feel full faster (that's why drinking water before a meal works, and there was some research out two or three years back showing that mass is what makes you feel full).

    2% milk has a 1:1:1 calorie ratio.

    Yeah, I was being a little too simplistic with "[never] drink calories," and I also agree that milk is probably the best liquid-with-calories to drink. I still think it's a good rule of thumb to follow, and makes getting your diet organized easier.

    Apperantly, it hydrates better than water, which makes it a perfect source of carbs in the morning and during and after a workout (carbs digest quicker than fat or protein, making it good for immediate satiation).

    agentk13 on
  • wallakawallaka Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    If you're gonna drink milk on low-carb, drink whole milk because it has a lower percentage of lactose than any skimmed milk.

    wallaka on
  • HamurabiHamurabi MiamiRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    agentk13 wrote: »
    Apperantly, it hydrates better than water...

    What's your source on this? I've been going through a gallon of whole milk a day recently, trying to gain weight, and I swear it actually dehydrates me. I know milk is something like 87% water, but during these recent cold snaps we've had in Miami, I noticed my lips getting really dry and cracked -- something that never really happens to me (even in the winter), and which you'd think wouldn't be happening if I were drinking 90% of a gallon of water in one day. My scale also reports a really low hydration level as compared to when I'm not gaining weight (which usually means I'm drinking a gallon of water every day).

    Hamurabi on
  • agentk13agentk13 __BANNED USERS
    edited January 2011
    Hamurabi wrote: »
    agentk13 wrote: »
    Apperantly, it hydrates better than water...

    What's your source on this? I've been going through a gallon of whole milk a day recently, trying to gain weight, and I swear it actually dehydrates me. I know milk is something like 87% water, but during these recent cold snaps we've had in Miami, I noticed my lips getting really dry and cracked -- something that never really happens to me (even in the winter), and which you'd think wouldn't be happening if I were drinking 90% of a gallon of water in one day. My scale also reports a really low hydration level as compared to when I'm not gaining weight (which usually means I'm drinking a gallon of water every day).

    Here's one. You can find a lot just by searching through google scholar, suggesting that everyone's a little surprised about the finding.

    agentk13 on
  • DracilDracil Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Hmm, pretty dead thread.

    So I've been low-carbing for a month now, mainly after reading Taubes' new book. Aside from checking labels for carbs, I've not really been carb counting. I still eat out or microwave/oven simple frozen/refrigerated stuff and it's been working decently at about 2lb a week.

    The thing is, I don't know if I've actually ever hit ketosis. Haven't bothered using ketostix, but I don't feel like I ever went through that awful foggy/headachy/tired phase that people dread. It could also just be from me being chronically sleep-deprived to the point I can't actually tell the difference between being in that phase and my usual self though. I also don't know what the supposed keto-breath is like but I've also been chewing gum often in case I do actually have it. But my appetite has gone down and I don't really have carb cravings so I'm assuming I'm in it.

    I'm still not sure if I should be going protein or fat to replace carbs though as I've heard bad things about both. Protein: something about bone damage and acidic blood/urine but also people saying protein actually helps the bone. Fat: stuff about how it damages arterial linings making it easier for plaques to form, negating the benefits of lowering triglycerides on a low-crab diet. My friend also once sent me some study about how people eating a lot of saturated fat had higher incidence of diabetes though when I looked at the data, it didn't seem to quite support the conclusion (they were eating more of everything, including carbs).

    Also, is olive oil actually okay for cooking? I've heard high temperatures turns it into trans fats and other bad stuff, which means it might only be suitable cold or only in certain types of cooking.

    Dracil on
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  • YougottawannaYougottawanna Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Part of the problem with evaluating the health of diets is that each one is generally compared to a hypothetical ideal diet with no risks - but no such diet exists. Based on what I've read, the dangers of a low-carb diet are largely speculative, while the dangers of a high-carb diet are well established.

    I never went through a carb crash either. Maybe that's because I had already cut sugar (but not grains) out of my diet by the time I went low-carb, but I think the carb crash is just worse for some people than others.

    Yougottawanna on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Well if you go with a high protein low carb low fat diet you'll eventually lose too much weight, become gaunt, have very low energy levels, and if you were to stay on such a diet, potentially starve to death. Taube talks about this in GCBC, but I haven't read his new book, which from what I gather is a dumb downed and far shorter version of GCBC.

    That said it's fine if you've still got fat stores to draw energy from, but once those go you need dietary energy, which means fat or carbs.

    ketosis isn't a black or white thing - it's not like you're in it all the time and then you're not. If you're eating pretty low carb, you'll probably be in ketosis a good portion of the day.

    I have no idea what you're talking about with protein and bones. The most important thing for your bones is adequate vitamin d intake.

    You're not going to develop diabetes on a low carb diet, and saturated is NOT a risk factor for heart disease, and has never been shown to be despite thirty years of expensive studies atempting to prove that it is.

    If you search this thread for like, "LDL" or something you'll probably find some posts from me going in depth on heart disease and it's actual risk factors.

    geckahn on
  • Michael VoxMichael Vox Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Regarding Milk, I can't speak to science, but when my wife and I were on low carb and began the phase where you reintroduce milk our weight loss immediately halted for several days, then slowly started again.

    Michael Vox on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    and olive oil is fine for cooking. Just dont use extra virgin for cooking, thats for cold use.

    also butter/ghee, lard, and coconut oil are good for cooking. Just don't use industrially processed seed oils and you'll be all good.

    geckahn on
  • JuliusJulius Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    geckahn wrote: »
    I have no idea what you're talking about with protein and bones. The most important thing for your bones is adequate vitamin d intake.

    No it's adequate calcium intake and walking around in the sun. Adequate vitamin d intake is for people who have little or no exposure to sun (i.e. people working night shifts and such, old people). If you go about during the day there is little reason to suspect low vitamin d levels.


    You're absolutely right that protein has little to do with bone-density, but speaking as someone with very low bone-density just vitamin D is not going to cut it. Dairy and sun is what is important. (I should go to the beach, the doctor recommended it!)

    Julius on
  • JuliusJulius Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    geckahn wrote: »
    and olive oil is fine for cooking. Just dont use extra virgin for cooking, thats for cold use.

    also butter/ghee, lard, and coconut oil are good for cooking. Just don't use industrially processed seed oils and you'll be all good.

    Not that cooking with extra virgin is bad. It's just a bit silly to do it.

    Julius on
  • override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Oh hey Geckahn is here

    Earlier people were talking about rice, but you seem to know a lot about this sort of thing. Is rice really "low in digestible carbs"?

    What do you think of Dreamfield's low digestible carb noodles? I want to try them but I'm worried they're pretty much a scam

    override367 on
  • YougottawannaYougottawanna Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I just have a general question/gripe: why do they put maltitol in everything?

    My understanding is that most people digest it as sugar or at least that they do in fact digest it, so for keeping down carb levels its not great. It also has the upset stomach factor. Normally I have a strong stomach but maltitol is my kryptonite I guess.

    All this low-carb shit has maltitol. Is it cheaper than other artificial sweeteners? Why is it so prevalent in everything? It doesn't taste any better than sucralose or splenda, at least not to me.

    Yougottawanna on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Julius wrote: »
    geckahn wrote: »
    I have no idea what you're talking about with protein and bones. The most important thing for your bones is adequate vitamin d intake.

    No it's adequate calcium intake and walking around in the sun. Adequate vitamin d intake is for people who have little or no exposure to sun (i.e. people working night shifts and such, old people). If you go about during the day there is little reason to suspect low vitamin d levels.


    You're absolutely right that protein has little to do with bone-density, but speaking as someone with very low bone-density just vitamin D is not going to cut it. Dairy and sun is what is important. (I should go to the beach, the doctor recommended it!)

    Well I meant vitamin D levels. Sun is obviously preferably. and calcium yes, thats a given.

    Most people are vitamin d deficient though so it is a supplement that is useful. Not alot of people are outside during the middle of the day 5 days a week. To really get the benefits of vitamin D you want to shoot for at least a 50 ng/ml blood level.
    Oh hey Geckahn is here

    Earlier people were talking about rice, but you seem to know a lot about this sort of thing. Is rice really "low in digestible carbs"?

    What do you think of Dreamfield's low digestible carb noodles? I want to try them but I'm worried they're pretty much a scam

    Well "digestible carbs" would be net carbs I guess, which is just carbs minus fiber. And rice is definitely not low in net carbs.

    Those noodles look legit. I'm not a big fan of heavily altered pasta with added gluten, but it's got positive reviews from diabetics on amazon so it's probably good from a carb standpoint. Personally I'm a fan of real food and if I wanted pasta would just make it a cheat meal.
    My understanding is that most people digest it as sugar or at least that they do in fact digest it, so for keeping down carb levels its not great. It also has the upset stomach factor. Normally I have a strong stomach but maltitol is my kryptonite I guess.

    Maltitol is a fermentable polyol, your gut bacteria will use it as food and it can contribute to IBS symptoms. So thats probably why you'd be having problems with it. It's a type of food that's part of what are called FODMAPS. fermentable – oligo- di- and monosaccharides and polyols
    What FODMAPs have in common is that they make it to the colon without being hydrolysed and absorbed in the small bowel the way our fuel-source starches and regular sugars are. They can all be considered “prebiotics”. However, unlike longer molecules like inulin that are also fermented in the colon, the FODMAPs tend to be rapidly fermented in the proximal parts of the colon, rather than slowly fermented more distally. This rapid proximal fermentation can even lead to increased growth of bacteria in the terminal ileum – the distal part of the small bowel that attaches to the proximal colon – then you have SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth).

    geckahn on
  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    btdubs made roasted nuts today with butter and coconut oil

    that is good!

    too bad i ate a lot after some alcohol but still

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
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  • cabsycabsy the fattest rainbow unicorn Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Oh hey Geckahn is here

    Earlier people were talking about rice, but you seem to know a lot about this sort of thing. Is rice really "low in digestible carbs"?

    What do you think of Dreamfield's low digestible carb noodles? I want to try them but I'm worried they're pretty much a scam

    There's quite a bit of teal deer on the internet about the Dreamfields stuff, including some in this thread from months and months ago, but the basic info seems to be for some people they don't work as a low carb pasta at all and for some they do. Also that if you overcook the noodles or reheat the noodles (which will overcook them) it no longer works as a low-in-digestible-carbs pasta for anyone, because it breaks down what they've coated the grains with.

    I actually was just thinking of this thread! I am trying to cut back on carbs a bit and realized when I want something crunchy I inevitably go for some easy 'french fries that are baked slightly too long' action. Any advice on what I can replace this with that'll have the same overbaked french fry texture and hopefully go well with some spicy tomato sauce for dipping?

    cabsy on
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