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Computer's too damn noisy (Update)

Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
edited January 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
I want to swap out the fans for something a bit quieter, but I've never even looked into fans (always used stock), so I don't know how to determin which are the quietest.

There's a side-fan that looks like a standard 80mm fan, the CPU fan is for an old Athalon XP socket A processor, and the fan in the power supply (though I'm not sure that can be replaced).

What would be some good replacements that hopefully aren't too horribly expensive?

Update: Alright, the fan is showing up today, so I need to know what's the best way to remove thermal paste when applying a new CPU fan? And what's the best way to apply the new thermal paste when putting it on?

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    stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    This is where you want to start. There is a ton of information there about what components will run quietest. You might find that you will need to do major surgery to your case if it wasn't designed to be quiet.

    stigweard on
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    robaalrobaal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    First try to ascertain which one is making the most noise - I assume that you can disconnect the side fan, and stopping the CPU fan for a second won't do any damage (just touch the hub) which will leave the PSU.

    You can change the PSU fan, though it's a bit dangerous, as a discharge from one of the capacitors might be enough to kill a person; OTOH the PSUs with >120mm fans have them attached to the part of the case without the components. The fans also aren't always connected via a plug - sometimes the leads are just soldered to the PCB; you can just cut the cables and connect them with the ones on the new fan by wrapping them together, though I wouldn't trust such a connection too much, and soldering, although rather easy, requires some extra equipment.

    Really, I think any decent fan at <2500rpms will be quiet enough - the guys at spcr tend to aim for... well - silence - so they quote lower rpms than that. You can also get/make a rheobus that will let you control the speed, or reduce it semi-permanently by connecting the fan to 7V (~60% rpms?) or 5V instead of the standard 12V which is easy to achieve with the standard "molex" connectors


    btw. in my experience cutting out a stamped-holes kind of grill on the side panel and replacing it with a wire one drastically reduces the noise of the intake fan mounted there.

    robaal on
    "Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra when suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath.
    At night, the ice weasels come."

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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    Looks like my CPU fan is the culprit (I could barely hear the side-fan even right next to my ear).

    So, I'm eyeing this fan on Newegg. That should be enough to cool an 1800+ CPU, shouldn't it?

    Bionic Monkey on
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    Gotcha ForceGotcha Force Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    yes

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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    yes
    Bought'n.

    Bionic Monkey on
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    GrimmGrimm Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Have you considered something like this?

    Grimm on
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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    I considered it, but it's a little more high-tech than I need right now. I might look into one next year when I build a new gaming machine, but for now, I just need this comp to hold out a bit longer, without annoying the shit out of me.

    Bionic Monkey on
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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    Alright, the fan is showing up today, so I need to know what's the best way to remove thermal paste when applying a new CPU fan? And what's the best way to apply the new thermal paste when putting it on?

    Bionic Monkey on
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    japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Isopropyl alchohol, surgical spirit or similar. Something that's basically pure alchohol and will evaporate completely. If there's residue left on the CPU die you can get a "hot spot" of poor conduction, which will destroy the processor.

    When applying the new thermal paste, follow the instructions provided with the paste you're using. Different pastes have different application methods, for example Arctic Silver should be spread in a very thin layer over the CPU core, the Arctic cooling paste that came with my last heatsink just needed to be dotted on to the center.

    These days I find it's easier to use heat spreader pads instead of paste, especially if you're not overclocking.

    japan on
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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    Okay, the thermal paste didn't come with any instructions, and the manufacturer's website doesn't specify an application meathod. So would it be best to apply a thin layer just to the heatsynch before applying it then?

    Edit: All over. And man does it make a difference. I can actually hear my hard drives accessing. Thanks for everybody's help.

    Bionic Monkey on
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    robaalrobaal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Usually you apply the thermal paste on the CPU, as it's hard to tell where the CPU will make contact when spreading it on the heatsink, and spreading it all over the base is a waste (and in some rare cases might be slightly dangerous if you use a conductive TIM).

    Generally you should apply a "thin, uniform layer" but the difference between that and just applying a large enough "dot" of it in the center and letting it spread under pressure is negligible. You definitely don't want to make thick layer on the whole surface, as that might be too much to squeeze out.

    robaal on
    "Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra when suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath.
    At night, the ice weasels come."

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    UltaruneUltarune Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I purchased a geforce 6600 about 5 months ago and recently the fan has gotten very noisy, but still functions fine. Is it possible to get replacement graphics card fans, like pc fans, are there other cooling options, or am I shit out of luck?

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    robaalrobaal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    It depends on your video card cooler. You might be able to replace just the fan on some of them, and newegg has some evercools fans which might fit, but even if you can't you'll most likely be able to get a whole cooler -ie. fan and heatsink - that will be compatible with your card.

    It looks like even the worse ones are close to $15, so I suggest getting this one, it's supposedly as efficient as a Zalman VF900 and compatible with a wide range of cards, so you might be able to use it on your future card as well. It also has a big heatsink and although the fan isn't standard, I suspect you could just zip-tie a 70mm one to the heatsink if it wears out. It's rather large though:

    installation6_small.jpg

    robaal on
    "Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra when suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath.
    At night, the ice weasels come."

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