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Teach me about westerns

dexterdexter Registered User regular
edited July 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So what's the deal with all these old westerns? My grandfather has a whole bunch of them and I'm pretty keen to get into them all. Where should I start to keep me going? I'm pretty keen on watching some of the Clint Eastwood films first, and i know there are a lot out there, but which order should I watch them in?

Also, I noticed a lot of them have original italian titles, and the director/writer has an italian name. Are the majority of these in italian, does Eastwood speak italian or are they dubs? Either way doesn't bother me.

Thanks in advance.

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    ProjeckProjeck Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    The term 'Spaghetti Western' originates from the Italian western renaissance of the mid 60's, here's an article on it.

    A good starting place, in my opinion, would be the Dollars trilogy, directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood. These being A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good the Bad and the Ugly.

    Projeck on
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    EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Projeck wrote: »
    The term 'Spaghetti Western' originates from the Italian western renaissance of the mid 60's, here's an article on it.

    A good starting place, in my opinion, would be the Dollars trilogy, directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood. These being A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good the Bad and the Ugly.

    If you like those, watch Once Upon A Time In The West next.

    Esh on
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    Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    edited July 2010
    dexter wrote: »
    Also, I noticed a lot of them have original italian titles, and the director/writer has an italian name. Are the majority of these in italian, does Eastwood speak italian or are they dubs? Either way doesn't bother me.

    Thanks in advance.

    What the other guys said.

    For the language thing, any DVD you get it generally going to be in English. When they were made, they were recorded with the actors speaking whichever language they knew- Americans speaking English, the Italian actors speaking Italian. For the English release they dubbed the Italians over with English, for the Italian release they dubbed the American voices over with Italian.

    Fun fact, if you get the newer DVD release of The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (the one with the brown-on-white box design), they actually reinserted scenes with Eastwood and Eli Wallach that were in the Italian release but not the English- but with the English audio track for those scenes lost, they had to redub the scenes again; with the now much, much older Eastwood and Wallach. The effect is really pretty weird.

    Angel_of_Bacon on
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    ProjeckProjeck Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Projeck wrote: »
    The term 'Spaghetti Western' originates from the Italian western renaissance of the mid 60's, here's an article on it.

    A good starting place, in my opinion, would be the Dollars trilogy, directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood. These being A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good the Bad and the Ugly.

    If you like those, watch Once Upon A Time In The West next.

    Yes yes a thousand time yes

    You're good with any Sergio Leone films, really

    Projeck on
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    CorcoranCadetCorcoranCadet Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I'm surprised no one has mentioned The Magnificent Seven yet. You'll recognize the names Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, and James Coburn. Pretty all star cast. A good film, but on top of that, one of the best film scores of all time provided by Elmer Bernstein.

    CorcoranCadet on
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    dexterdexter Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Rad, thanks a lot, you guys! I very much look forward to this. I should have mentioned I loved Unforgiven, so I'm sure I'll enjoy these. I didn't realize the good the bad an the ugly was the third in the dollar trilogy.

    So what are some other films that you guys really liked should I check out after these? I have a good month of uni holidays so time isn't an issue.

    dexter on
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    ProjeckProjeck Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Well, it isn't a western, but if you're going to watch The Magnificent Seven, make sure to watch Seven Samurai first

    Projeck on
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    GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    There's a western thread in D&D with some very good suggestions:

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=119400

    And don't feel forced to watch Seven Samurai before watching Magnificent Seven.

    Grislo on
    This post was sponsored by Tom Cruise.
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    EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    It was a little campy, but I really liked The Quick And The Dead.

    If you want sheer insanity, Sukiyaki Western Django.

    Esh on
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    CorcoranCadetCorcoranCadet Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    For John Wayne: She Wore A Yellow Ribbon and True Grit. Both are quite good.

    CorcoranCadet on
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    RynaRyna Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Hang em high, High Plains Drifter are other good Clint movies

    but Unforgiven is the best

    Ryna on
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    jungleroomxjungleroomx It's never too many graves, it's always not enough shovels Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    There's actually quite a few good modern-ish westerns.

    Unforgiven, Lonesome Dove, Tombstone, The Outlaw Josey Wales, Open Range, etc.

    Even the first Young Guns is good for a yuk.

    jungleroomx on
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    NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Grislo wrote: »
    There's a western thread in D&D with some very good suggestions:

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/showthread.php?t=119400

    And don't feel forced to watch Seven Samurai before watching Magnificent Seven.

    Yeah, just watch Seven Samurai instead of Magnificent Seven

    NotASenator on
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    dexterdexter Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    You guys are awesome. What's up with having to watch Seven Samurai first? Are they like a duology or something?

    I'll definitely check out the D&D thread, thanks dudes!

    dexter on
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    jungleroomxjungleroomx It's never too many graves, it's always not enough shovels Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Seven Samurai was the original story, and the Magnificent Seven is the western remake of it.

    jungleroomx on
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    PolloDiabloPolloDiablo Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    If you only ever watch one western, make it High Noon.

    PolloDiablo on
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    ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    dexter wrote: »
    You guys are awesome. What's up with having to watch Seven Samurai first? Are they like a duology or something?

    I'll definitely check out the D&D thread, thanks dudes!

    The Magnificent Seven is a shot for shot remake of the Seven Samurai. The importance of it is how well it works as a western. It shows a lot of Ford's influence on Kurosawa. If you want a general listing:

    Classic Westerns:
    Stagecoach
    Shane
    Red River
    High Noon
    Winchester ’73
    The Searchers

    Spaghetti Westerns:
    The Dollars Trilogy
    Once Upon a Time in the West
    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

    Others:
    Hud
    Rio Bravo

    Thomamelas on
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    GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I think calling it a shot for shot remake is taking it just a touch too far.

    But still, one can absolutely watch MS without watching SS. I'd also absolutely recommend SS. Because it's a good movie.

    Grislo on
    This post was sponsored by Tom Cruise.
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    metaghostmetaghost An intriguing odor A delicate touchRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Sam Peckinpah directed two of the all-time classic Westerns, The Wild Bunch and Pat Garret and Billy the Kid, the latter of which you'll want to watch in its director's cut.

    I'd also recommend either version of 3:10 to Yuma.

    metaghost on
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    28682868 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Westerns may be my favorite genre. The Best Westerns, or Westernesque movies:

    Rio Bravo
    The Proposition (Aus)
    The Wild Bunch
    Tombstone
    Lonesome Dove (book is better)
    The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Little action, beautiful cinematography)
    Open Range
    Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (Directors Cut)
    Unforgiven
    True Grit (Coen Brothers are making a version of this, based on the book, stay tuned for that)
    No Country for Old Men
    Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia
    High Noon
    High Plains Drifter

    I could go on, but make sure you watch these.

    2868 on
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    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    No recommendation for The Outlaw Josie Wales yet?


    The Outlaw Josie Wales.

    FyreWulff on
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    jungleroomxjungleroomx It's never too many graves, it's always not enough shovels Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I said The Outlaw Josie Wales.

    jungleroomx on
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    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    I said The Outlaw Josie Wales.

    Spell it correctly next time

    FyreWulff on
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    NightshadeNightshade Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Is No Country for Old Men really considered a western? It was a brilliant movie but I guess I never really thought of it as a western.

    Nightshade on
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    jungleroomxjungleroomx It's never too many graves, it's always not enough shovels Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I've been on a typo rampage in the last few days.

    Not only typo, but word replacement rampage.

    Don't you italicize at me unless we're ready to do a West Side Story dance-off rumble, complete with leather jackets.

    jungleroomx on
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    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    I've been on a typo rampage in the last few days.

    Not only typo, but word replacement rampage.

    Don't you italicize at me unless we're ready to do a West Side Story dance-off rumble, complete with leather jackets.

    I'm just going to (actual Josie Wales spoiler) do this to you:
    *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click* *click*
    *stab*


    Also, The Frisco Kid and Blazing Saddles are comedy-westerns you should also check out.

    FyreWulff on
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    28682868 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Nightshade wrote: »
    Is No Country for Old Men really considered a western? It was a brilliant movie but I guess I never really thought of it as a western.

    It fills all the tropes. It depends on how you identify westerns, which is why I left the disclaimer westernesque. Westerns are a big deal in my family. My uncle classifies westerns as pictures with settings in the American West post civil war through the turn of the century. My grandfather classified westerns as pictures with horses, guns, and black and white hats. No matter where they took place. (e.g. the Man from Snowy River and the Proposition). I classify westerns as more of a style, a feeling, an aesthetic, or ideal. So in my book Inglourious Basterds would be western, but that's preposterous you say! You're probably right. However, I do not think it is a stretch to call Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, or No Country for Old Men a western.

    It's just my approach to appreciating and classifying art. I judge films by their cinematic forebears. What was this films father? It's just how I look at it, others may look at it a different way. Neither is the correct way.

    Also, Outlaw Josie Wales is a good movie, but I like High Plains Drifter a little more when it comes to post Leone Eastwood pictures.

    2868 on
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    ReitenReiten Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    If you want some extremely lighthearted and silly slapstick spoofs of westerns, watch "They call me Trinity" and "Trinity is still my name." Disclaimer: people seem to either love them or hate them with little middle ground.

    Reiten on
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    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
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    ZedarZedar Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    If you only ever watch one western, make it High Noon.


    This.

    I will also highly recommend They Call Me Trinity. I understand it has sequels but I haven't seen them yet.

    Zedar on
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    NightshadeNightshade Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    2868 wrote: »
    Nightshade wrote: »
    Is No Country for Old Men really considered a western? It was a brilliant movie but I guess I never really thought of it as a western.
    It fills all the tropes. It depends on how you identify westerns, which is why I left the disclaimer westernesque. Westerns are a big deal in my family. My uncle classifies westerns as pictures with settings in the American West post civil war through the turn of the century. My grandfather classified westerns as pictures with horses, guns, and black and white hats. No matter where they took place. (e.g. the Man from Snowy River and the Proposition). I classify westerns as more of a style, a feeling, an aesthetic, or ideal. So in my book Inglourious Basterds would be western, but that's preposterous you say! You're probably right. However, I do not think it is a stretch to call Bring me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, or No Country for Old Men a western.

    It's just my approach to appreciating and classifying art. I judge films by their cinematic forebears. What was this films father? It's just how I look at it, others may look at it a different way. Neither is the correct way.

    Also, Outlaw Josie Wales is a good movie, but I like High Plains Drifter a little more when it comes to post Leone Eastwood pictures.

    Thinking about it now, that really does make perfect sense. I agree with Inglorious Basterds being considered a western, so i certainly understand your logic about it being about the style more than specifics. This is just a small revelation, i never realized No Country was essentially a western.

    Nightshade on
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    Cedar BrownCedar Brown Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I really liked The Cowboys.

    Red Sun is damned awesome.

    I'll watch The Wild Bunch any time.

    John Wayne's The Alamo is a favourite of mine. My brother liked Django.

    Cedar Brown on
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    TalkcTalkc Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Here is my list of the 7 most essential westerns, both conventional and unconventional, that everyone should see.

    The Searchers - This is the best western of all time IMO.

    Old Yeller - A piece of life in rural West Texas.

    The Yearling - Another slice of life of the old west.

    Shane - One of the best hero stories ever told.

    Tombstone - The Quintessential modern western.

    Open Range - One of the most enjoyable modern westerns.

    True Grit - John Wayne at his best ( Second only to The Searchers ).


    And then there is the one Mini Series, that you HAVE TO SEE.

    Its called Lonsesome Dove. If you havent seen it, SEE IT.

    Talkc on
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    CorcoranCadetCorcoranCadet Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I almost forgot to mention The Big Country It has Burl Ives. That's right, Burl Ives.

    CorcoranCadet on
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