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Possibility of moving to Vancouver. What do we need to know?

ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
edited July 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
To set up the situation, my wife and I together make around 50,000 per year. In 6 months or so she may have an opportunity to take a job in Vancouver which would pay about what we make together right now. Now there's a several thousand mile move involved here, plus crossing the border (we live in Vermont now). There are a number of concerns that we have, of course.

Pets? We have 4 cats (and 2 rats!) that would be moving with us. How difficult is this to do across the border?

I'm assuming that while firearms are present in Canada, bringing them across the border is difficult enough to not bother. Am I wrong about this?

Aside from the obvious "you're moving several thousand miles, set aside more than a week and a bunch of cash to move with," what sort of things do we need to start thinking about? Paperwork we need to get in order?

WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
Shadowfire on

Posts

  • adytumadytum The Inevitable Rise And FallRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Work permits and visas, to start.

    adytum on
  • WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Are you Canadian citizens? If not you will either need to gain citizenship or become 'landed immigrants'. The main difference is landed immigrants can't vote. If you don't have family in Canada/aren't already Canadian you will probably need to use the 'point system' if you want to become citizens. Having a job offer on the table bags you quite a few points so that may be slightly easier for you than for most people.

    My main suggestion... throw away everything you think you know about Canadians and let your experience rebuild your thoughts about them. There are alot of stereotypes, some that are still reasonably true, and some that are outdated.

    Check out houseprices (MLS/Realtor.ca) in the area, and make sure you can find something in your budget. From what I've heard Vancouver and Victoria are some of the more expensive Canadian cities to live in.

    If you can, buy 4 months worth of private health travel insurance before you leave. Actually, you should find out how long before you're eligible for your provinces health plan, because in Ontario you have to have lived here 3 months to be eligible for OHIP ('free healthcare') so you need to have private health insurance for that time.

    Wezoin on
  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    You need a license to own/posses a gun (rifle or shotgun) in Canada. If it's a handgun you need a special license.

    EskimoDave on
  • TrillianTrillian Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    If it's a handgun forget about it.
    If it's a long gun forget about it.
    You can't bring them across the border thanks to a plethora of american guns being used in violent crime.
    Bring the animals. The cats will need up to date rabies vaccinations to cross.

    If the employer is going to transfer her to Vancouver then she'll have all the paperwork in place.
    If you want employment you'll have to go through some avenues to do it, but it can be done, and it's easier while you're there with a spouse.
    Doc just did this, and he'll have more to say if he finds this thread.

    Vancouver is mad expensive to live in, but if you have the income to support the habit, it's the best place.
    There are neighbourhoods with distinct cultures and flavours, lending each a smaller town feel, despite being a part of one of the biggest cities in the second largest country on earth, the climate doesn't suck, and the population is diverse to say the least. Good luck!

    Trillian on

    They cast a shadow like a sundial in the morning light. It was half past 10.
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    One thing to keep in mind is, we have some of the most expensive property prices in North America here in Vancouver. And our real estate market didn't crash with the economy, as it did in the US, because our banks weren't giving out mortgages to anyone who could breathe.

    Also, yeah, you should probably leave the guns in the USA. You will get looked at like you have a third head if you talk about firearms up here in most contexts. Gun ownership and use is not a significant part of culture in urban Canada. Furthermore, gun ownership is not a protected right under our constitution.

    If you do want to bring your guns, this appears to be the relevant government department. Frankly, unless you are a big time hobby hunter, I expect it to be a tremendous pain in the ass. Actually, for your pets, you should look at the Canada Border Services website as well, they should be able to hook you up.

    Culturally, well, have you been to Canada? In some ways we're just as close to Western Europe as we are to our southern cousins. By Canadian standards, the Democrats are kind of right wing.

    Also, do you like rain?

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    <<<THIS POST IS NOT VERY POSITIVE ABOUT VANCOUVER, SO IF YOUR FEELINGS WILL GET HURT, TURN BACK NOW>>>

    She'll probably wind up on a work visa. If that is the case, be aware that it will be VERY difficult if not impossible to get a job for yourself unless you have a very specific skill set, and that if your wife wants to leave her job, it very likely means leaving Canada, as her visa will be tied to her company. That's exactly what happened to me; I moved to Vancouver 10 months ago from Seattle, and I'm moving back next month because my job kinda sucked.

    Don't live downtown. Unless you want to spend the premium to live in Yaletown, you'll have to deal with homeless people pissing on your back steps, really irritating people, and general noise. Kitsilano is better, if you drive and it's not too far from work.

    If she ends up on a work visa and you are restricted from working, be aware that $50,000 won't get you very far in this town/country. Rent's going to be about $800 minimum for a place you'll like. Want to buy some Cheerios? $6 a box. Block of cheese? $8. Shitty beer is $15 for a 6-pack. Eating out is less expensive than it was in Seattle, oddly enough (except booze, it's about 50% more in Van). Want to drive a car? ~$2,000 per year for insurance, plus gas at roughly $4.60 per gallon. Oh, and you'll have to either buy a car here, or import yours for god knows how much in taxes and fees.

    Other recent gripes:
    - I got two slices of pizza and a coke for at this place downtown where they had a big sign that advertised exactly that for $5, tax included. So I put down $5, and the girl behind the counter goes "it's $5.50." I point at the sign that's directly next to her, and she looks at me like I'm a fucking alien, and it's the first time anyone has pointed it out. She then kind of rolls her eyes and goes "do you have the 50 cents?" as though whether or not I had the cash was my problem with the situation. It's just an example, but this kind of thing happens almost daily. People do retarded things, then look at you like you're the asshole.

    - Banks suck balls. Everyone charges for checking (and anything else they can get away with), and you will not be able to get a credit card that's any good when you move here. You'll have to get a secured card, where you put down a deposit. It's silly. They treat me like an inconvenience whenever I need to use a teller.

    - That guy who's talking at the movie theater? You're going to have to be the one that tells him to shut up, just about every time. Except in my case, the dude was at Cirque du Soleil blabbing while the people were on stage. There are the same number of jerks, but people here are super passive. It's like living in a city of betas. I honestly think that's what causes the first gripe I listed. People don't get yelled at enough.

    - The Vancouver Special. It's a tacky eyesore of a design, and there are like 500 of them per block.
    vanspecial1.thumbnail.jpg

    - Taxes - 12% sales tax on everything, on top of your BC and Canadian income taxes that will probably be higher than what you pay in the US. For me, it wasn't too terrible, since WA is like that, albiet a little less intense.

    - It didn't directly affect me too much, but the housing market is totally out of control. I had a friend from here tell me straight faced that it wasn't that bad, because you can get a 1-bedroom condo in the suburbs (Burnaby, not way out in Surrey) for $300,000. People are totally delusional about how much housing should cost.

    - Canada's poorest postal code. There are significant property crime issues (car break-ins, theft, vandalism, etc) despite violent crime not being too bad by American standards. Drug problems aplenty. East Hastings just outside of downtown is basically an open air drug market after 10pm, and mostly before, too.

    I'll stop griping, because it makes it sound like I hate the city or something. I don't. Every city has issues, I just want to let you know about Vancouver's before you get blindsided by them.

    Doc on
  • SwashbucklerXXSwashbucklerXX Swashbucklin' Canuck Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    There are a few misleading/inaccurate pieces of information here.

    First, re: Wezoin's post: You don't need to become a permanent resident/landed immigrant or citizen to work in Canada. If you have an employment offer, your employer will take care of the work visa for you, but yeah, as Doc said, until you've worked here for a few years (at which point you can get access to an expedited process to stay here as a landed immigrant/permanent resident because, hey, you've got a job) you have to keep the job if you want to stay in the country.

    Also, you can't use the "point system" to become a citizen, that's to determine whether you're eligible to come in as an independent professional landed immigrant. The only way to become a Canadian citizen is to be a permanent resident (by whatever method) for 3.5 years first, then apply for citizenship.

    In general: If your wife has a work permit, you can apply to get one as well without too much trouble. Check out the information at the bottom of this page for more information. In fact, take some time to peruse the CIC website in general. It's actually pretty clear on the rules and processes.

    As for Doc's post... yeah, that's a pretty accurate description of some of the cultural differences/financial difficulties you'll encounter as an American who has moved to Canada (or Vancouver in specific for the stuff at the bottom), albeit through the lens of somebody who is currently a bit disgruntled with it all. I've been here for eight years now and feel more at home in Canada than I do in the USA, but I do sometimes miss having a good scrappy discussion, American-style. On the other hand, discussing politics is pretty fun here, because Canadians are better at respectfully disagreeing with each other. If you're the type of person who is likely to feel defensive if you hear people say negative things about the USA, I would recommend avoiding Canada in general, but you don't have to worry about people holding it against you personally. I've had nothing but positive/friendly responses when people learn I'm American.

    I'd say the cost of living in Vancouver should be your biggest concern. It's even worse than it is here in Toronto, which is pretty bad (we can't even begin to think about buying property here with a household income similar to yours).

    SwashbucklerXX on
    Want to find me on a gaming service? I'm SwashbucklerXX everywhere.
  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Doc is exaggerating with the beers prices, however, it is much more expensive than America. 52% of the price in BC is taxes, whereas America has a national average of 14%. With that said the government controlling of the prices can work out in your favour when you're drinking certain craft and imported beers.

    EskimoDave on
  • NylonathetepNylonathetep Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Canadian beers are worth it. You Americans just don't know how to make a real beer.



    You'll need to worry about housing. It's expensive as hell in Vancouver.

    Shouldn't have too much problems with the cats. They just need to get check out again by the vet, licence and take shots again.

    Nylonathetep on
    714353-1.png
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Doc, where the hell where you buying your groceries man? $6 Cheerios is crazy. You weren't shopping at the higher priced upmarket downtown chains by any chance were you?

    As for the beer thing, I don't think Doc is saying that all the beer here is bad, but that bad beer is over priced.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • SerpentSerpent Sometimes Vancouver, BC, sometimes Brisbane, QLDRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    What the hell with docs post and inaccuracies

    $6 cheerios? $15 for a 6 pack? what kind of 6 pack are you buying?

    Serpent on
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    15 isn't that big an exaggeration, you can easily spend $12 on a six pack with tax, though of decent beer. Maybe if he went to a private liquour store or cold beer and wine place that didn't match the government store prices, you could end up paying that much.

    Edit: Ok, so to be constructive, if the OP does end up moving here, and wants advice on where to shop cheaply in Vancouver, us locals will be able to help out.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    Canadian beers are worth it. You Americans just don't know how to make a real beer.

    Ahaha

    haha

    ha

    haha

    (Yes, the beers that are exported from the US to Canada suck. That's not the beers I am talking about.)

    Doc on
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    Serpent wrote: »
    What the hell with docs post and inaccuracies

    $6 cheerios? $15 for a 6 pack? what kind of 6 pack are you buying?

    I'll take a picture on the way home today.

    $6 Cheerios was at the Save-On foods on Cambie just before Broadway.

    Doc on
  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    To set up the situation, my wife and I together make around 50,000 per year. In 6 months or so she may have an opportunity to take a job in Vancouver which would pay about what we make together right now. Now there's a several thousand mile move involved here, plus crossing the border (we live in Vermont now). There are a number of concerns that we have, of course.

    Pets? We have 4 cats (and 2 rats!) that would be moving with us. How difficult is this to do across the border?

    I'm assuming that while firearms are present in Canada, bringing them across the border is difficult enough to not bother. Am I wrong about this?

    Aside from the obvious "you're moving several thousand miles, set aside more than a week and a bunch of cash to move with," what sort of things do we need to start thinking about? Paperwork we need to get in order?

    To have the same "Real Income" (income adjusted for cost of living) in Vancouver as you do in VT, you'll need to increase your combined income by a decent amount, and as others have said it would likely be very difficult to secure employment once you're there. If this is something you and your wife are interested in, you need to start looking for a place to work that would be willing to sponsor your visa (and hopefully pays as much as your wife's potential job :P) to offset the cost of living difference.

    a5ehren on
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    I'll be less cantankerous in this post.

    Things you will like about Vancouver:

    - Beaches and parks. There's plenty of them, and they are mostly great. Some of the best sunsets I've seen are over English Bay. Stanley Park is kinda touristy, but still great.

    - Close mountains. I'll sometimes do a motorcycle ride up Cypress or Seymour after work, and be back by 8:00. Whistler is great, too, even in the Summer it's beautiful.

    - Laid back way of life. This is very much a Pacific Northwest thing. It's very similar to Portland and Seattle in that a combination of hiking shoes and argyle socks is work-appropriate attire that nobody will think is even a little odd.

    - Winters are mild by Northeast standards, but very rainy.

    - The scenery. Just look at the views on the trip to Whistler. It's breathtaking.

    - It's truly an international city. My coworkers: 1 other American, 3 people from England, 3 Canadians, 1 guy from Pakistan, 2 guys from somewhere in Eastern Europe (they are not directly on my team, so it's never come up), 1 guy from New Zealand, and 3 people from China, and a Finn.

    - The general quality of life is really high. Services are readily available for the most part, and people (besides the homeless) are mostly healthy. No, you don't have to wait in line to see a doctor.

    - There's lots to do, if you're in Van proper. Get out to Burnaby or down to Richmond and it's definitely the suburbs, though.

    Doc on
  • oncelingonceling Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Doc wrote: »
    <<<THIS POST IS NOT VERY POSITIVE ABOUT VANCOUVER, SO IF YOUR FEELINGS WILL GET HURT, TURN BACK NOW>>>

    Sorry you've had a rough time here Doc, I had a hard time settling into this city, took around 2-3 years before I knew how to get the best bang for my buck. I agree with you about people not getting yelled at enough, though!

    For free checking you want Coast Capital Savings, or if you keep a minimum of like 2k I think thats when the other banks will give you free checking, I'm with Scotiabank and they suck balls but they do give me free checking because I keep 2k in the bank there. I also had to have a secured card as an immigrant until the end of the first year, and they converted it to a regular credit card account for me. I wouldn't recommend Scotiabank, heh.

    I hate downtown and would never live in a Vancouver postal code again but if you don't have a car or want to be pretentious you'll definitely want to live there.

    For cheap groceries you generally want Real Canadian Superstore. There are none near the downtown area, which is why people there have a hard time with grocery bills. The closest one(s) are at least 15-20 min drive from the downtown and Kits area. Also good prices at Walmart superstores, I think the closest one to Vancouver is Grandview Hwy near the Burnaby border.

    Generally highest to lowest cost for grocery: Thrifty - IGA - Price Smart - Safeway - Save On - RC Superstore - Walmart

    Costco here pretty lame IMO and Superstore are sometimes better even in bulk but they have some decent items at Costco sometimes. Membership is $50 or $100 for premium (earlier hours, etc).

    For car insurance, it is extremely expensive. However, you can get a bare bones package for say $700 or so a year. BUT it will forfeit lots of things like third party liability D: and loss of use (theft) etc. Pretty shitty. The 2k package Doc talks about includes quite a few extras they try to say are basic insurance, its not.

    You will also want renters insurance if you're renting. Runs about $100/year.

    I use BCAA for insurance, they will do the basic car via ICBC (compulsory government car insurance racket) for you too if you want. You can also get a membership to get roadside assistance. It's cheap.

    Import the cats after getting their certificate:

    http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/imp/petani/felin1e.shtml

    Import the rats without extra reqirements:

    http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/imp/petani/rodente.shtml

    It will not be difficult, you tell them at the border what you have, you show the certificates for the cats and they wave you on.

    onceling on
  • SerpentSerpent Sometimes Vancouver, BC, sometimes Brisbane, QLDRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Lots of good things about Vancouver

    Lots of bad things too

    drug/slavery money keeps cost of living high.

    Serpent on
  • saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Yeah, most of the bads and goods about Vancouver have been covered already in this thread.

    But they left out the best part: AMAZING restaurants. Seriously, the gastronomy in Vancouver is superior to just about any other place in North America, save for maybe New York. In particular, the sushi available in Vancouver can be just fucking amazing. I'm told that you'd have to go to Tokyo to get something comparable, but I don't know how true that is.

    I loves me some sushi, and I've had it all across the country and Vancouver has, by far, the best. But more than that, they have sushi for every price: cheap and quick all the way up to Tojo's, the guy who invented the California roll.

    saggio on
    3DS: 0232-9436-6893
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Just for my own information, it seems like most of the issues with Van in your post Doc seem to be mostly "Canada" oriented rather than "This is just life in Vancouver, go to Ontario and you're peechy." Is that true?

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    Just for my own information, it seems like most of the issues with Van in your post Doc seem to be mostly "Canada" oriented rather than "This is just life in Vancouver, go to Ontario and you're peechy." Is that true?

    People I've met from other provinces have some of the same gripes.

    Doc on
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    saggio wrote: »
    Yeah, most of the bads and goods about Vancouver have been covered already in this thread.

    But they left out the best part: AMAZING restaurants. Seriously, the gastronomy in Vancouver is superior to just about any other place in North America, save for maybe New York. In particular, the sushi available in Vancouver can be just fucking amazing. I'm told that you'd have to go to Tokyo to get something comparable, but I don't know how true that is.

    I loves me some sushi, and I've had it all across the country and Vancouver has, by far, the best. But more than that, they have sushi for every price: cheap and quick all the way up to Tojo's, the guy who invented the California roll.

    Yes, this is the case. I can immediately think of 3 sushi places within walking distance that are better than just about anywhere in the greater Seattle area. There's one in N. Van that's ridiculously good, but I have to drive there.

    Doc on
  • DeciusDecius I'm old! I'm fat! I'M BLUE!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    saggio wrote: »
    In particular, the sushi available in Vancouver can be just fucking amazing. I'm told that you'd have to go to Tokyo to get something comparable, but I don't know how true that is.

    This. I can't eat sushi where I live. Vancouver ruined it for me, lol.
    Doc wrote: »
    People I've met from other provinces have some of the same gripes.

    Yeah, never ask an Albertan about a British Columbian. They might as well be different countries.

    Actually this is good for the OP. Canada is very regional, and there are differences in culture from province to province. Living in VT you might find B.C. a very different attitude. Go into it with an open mind and you'll be fine.

    Decius on
    camo_sig2.png
    I never finish anyth
  • PapillonPapillon Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    What Doc is saying is all pretty accurate description of some of the downsides of Vancouver. I just wanted to add a few points:
    Doc wrote: »
    - Banks suck balls. Everyone charges for checking (and anything else they can get away with), and you will not be able to get a credit card that's any good when you move here. You'll have to get a secured card, where you put down a deposit. It's silly. They treat me like an inconvenience whenever I need to use a teller.

    At least at my bank there are different checking account options which are free if you keep enough money in your account. If you go under the minimum balance, you need to pay. I often go to the teller, and have never had a problem.
    - Canada's poorest postal code. There are significant property crime issues (car break-ins, theft, vandalism, etc) despite violent crime not being too bad by American standards. Drug problems aplenty. East Hastings just outside of downtown is basically an open air drug market after 10pm, and mostly before, too.

    Canada's richest postal code is also in Greater Vancouver. Downtown Vancouver is generally nice except for the area immediately surrounding East Hastings. Even that area isn't particularly dangerous, afaik, just unpleasant.

    Edit: Handguns are very restricted in Canada. Long guns less so, but I don't know the exact rules.

    Papillon on
  • TrillianTrillian Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Doc wrote: »
    I'll be less cantankerous in this post.

    Things you will like about Vancouver:

    - Beaches and parks. There's plenty of them, and they are mostly great. Some of the best sunsets I've seen are over English Bay. Stanley Park is kinda touristy, but still great.

    - Close mountains. I'll sometimes do a motorcycle ride up Cypress or Seymour after work, and be back by 8:00. Whistler is great, too, even in the Summer it's beautiful.

    - Laid back way of life. This is very much a Pacific Northwest thing. It's very similar to Portland and Seattle in that a combination of hiking shoes and argyle socks is work-appropriate attire that nobody will think is even a little odd.

    - Winters are mild by Northeast standards, but very rainy.

    - The scenery. Just look at the views on the trip to Whistler. It's breathtaking.

    - It's truly an international city. My coworkers: 1 other American, 3 people from England, 3 Canadians, 1 guy from Pakistan, 2 guys from somewhere in Eastern Europe (they are not directly on my team, so it's never come up), 1 guy from New Zealand, and 3 people from China, and a Finn.

    - The general quality of life is really high. Services are readily available for the most part, and people (besides the homeless) are mostly healthy. No, you don't have to wait in line to see a doctor.

    - There's lots to do, if you're in Van proper. Get out to Burnaby or down to Richmond and it's definitely the suburbs, though.

    Hey don't go dissing Richmond.
    Richmond is great if you want to go ride your horse down a trail next to an ecologically diverse estuarine marine preserve with seals, salmon and porpoises, then leave and be downtown 40 minutes later via public transit.

    Richmond is also great for going to Hong Kong on the cheap. One trip to any of the 4 asian malls here and you'll swear you've skipped continents for the price of gas.

    Sure Vancouver has problems, but they're largely a product of our mild climate.
    Seattle and Portland have big homeless populations as well.

    Trillian on

    They cast a shadow like a sundial in the morning light. It was half past 10.
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Decius wrote: »
    Yeah, never ask an Albertan about a British Columbian. They might as well be different countries.

    Actually this is good for the OP. Canada is very regional, and there are differences in culture from province to province. Living in VT you might find B.C. a very different attitude. Go into it with an open mind and you'll be fine.

    Kind of like the U.S., I suppose. My parents live in Alabama now, I have family in Illinois, and I was originally born near Poughkeepsie, NY. The environments are obviously different, but the culture differences are incredible.

    Don't get me wrong, I've lived in Vermont most of my life (20 years of it), and I have no doubt that moving to Vancouver would be a major culture shock. I'm preparing myself for that, and I understand keeping an open mind. That's easy. Honestly, it was mostly the border crossing with all our shit that I was more worried about. We can leave our handgun behind (sell it, more likely), but the pets were a bigger deal. If that's as easy as it sounds (and by the links provided, it looks like it is), then no problem.

    As for her pay, I should describe the situation a bit better. If she were to move in to this position at their location here, she would be getting paid about what we both make together now. I would assume that, given the higher cost of living in Vancouver, the rate of pay there would be higher, but I do not know that for sure. It's something we'd find out as we get closer to moving time.

    Also, how are schools in the area? I've got my associates and begun working on my B.S., which I can continue to do long-distance if necessary, but obviously transferring would be better.

    Last, just a quick shout of thanks. This information is a lot to take in, but it is seriously helpful.

    Shadowfire on
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • DeusfauxDeusfaux Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    the homeless/drug/etc population in the DTES (downtown east side) is soooo harmless

    it's an important distinction that has to be made. I think if you're a vulnerable looking solo female walking through at 3am you might want to re-route or jump on a bus/in a taxi, but otherwise things like muggings just aren't really happening there.

    also the MAIN vancouver police department in smack in the middle of the area, and there is a highly visible police presence

    the area is also heavily mixed in with a "little china" neighborhood, and a beatnik arts culture neighborhood, so you have all sorts of "regular" people moving around with you at any given time

    there's one particular guy I've seen over the years that is more aggressive with his begging than I'm comfortable with, but that's out one out of all the rest

    Deusfaux on
  • NylonathetepNylonathetep Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Decius wrote: »
    Yeah, never ask an Albertan about a British Columbian. They might as well be different countries.

    Actually this is good for the OP. Canada is very regional, and there are differences in culture from province to province. Living in VT you might find B.C. a very different attitude. Go into it with an open mind and you'll be fine.

    Kind of like the U.S., I suppose. My parents live in Alabama now, I have family in Illinois, and I was originally born near Poughkeepsie, NY. The environments are obviously different, but the culture differences are incredible.

    Don't get me wrong, I've lived in Vermont most of my life (20 years of it), and I have no doubt that moving to Vancouver would be a major culture shock. I'm preparing myself for that, and I understand keeping an open mind. That's easy. Honestly, it was mostly the border crossing with all our shit that I was more worried about. We can leave our handgun behind (sell it, more likely), but the pets were a bigger deal. If that's as easy as it sounds (and by the links provided, it looks like it is), then no problem.

    As for her pay, I should describe the situation a bit better. If she were to move in to this position at their location here, she would be getting paid about what we both make together now. I would assume that, given the higher cost of living in Vancouver, the rate of pay there would be higher, but I do not know that for sure. It's something we'd find out as we get closer to moving time.

    Also, how are schools in the area? I've got my associates and begun working on my B.S., which I can continue to do long-distance if necessary, but obviously transferring would be better.

    Last, just a quick shout of thanks. This information is a lot to take in, but it is seriously helpful.

    Alberta to B.C is like Flordia to Texas... it's a world of difference.

    There's two universities in B.C... Simon Frasier and University of B.C. Everyone wants to get into UBC and it's very competative. Simon Fraiser is good for Computer Graphic Design thou.

    Nylonathetep on
    714353-1.png
  • SerpentSerpent Sometimes Vancouver, BC, sometimes Brisbane, QLDRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    I would assume that, given the higher cost of living in Vancouver, the rate of pay there would be higher, but I do not know that for sure. It's something we'd find out as we get closer to moving time.

    The rate of pay is generally the same or lower in Vancouver than the rest of Canada.

    People don't live in Vancouver for money -- they live here for mountains, oceans, rivers, parks, etc.

    A buddy of mine once said:
    "Where else can you ski on a glacier, go for a mountain bike ride, and finish the day kayaking, all on the same day in April?"

    Serpent on
  • saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Decius wrote: »
    Yeah, never ask an Albertan about a British Columbian. They might as well be different countries.

    Actually this is good for the OP. Canada is very regional, and there are differences in culture from province to province. Living in VT you might find B.C. a very different attitude. Go into it with an open mind and you'll be fine.

    Kind of like the U.S., I suppose. My parents live in Alabama now, I have family in Illinois, and I was originally born near Poughkeepsie, NY. The environments are obviously different, but the culture differences are incredible.

    Don't get me wrong, I've lived in Vermont most of my life (20 years of it), and I have no doubt that moving to Vancouver would be a major culture shock. I'm preparing myself for that, and I understand keeping an open mind. That's easy. Honestly, it was mostly the border crossing with all our shit that I was more worried about. We can leave our handgun behind (sell it, more likely), but the pets were a bigger deal. If that's as easy as it sounds (and by the links provided, it looks like it is), then no problem.

    As for her pay, I should describe the situation a bit better. If she were to move in to this position at their location here, she would be getting paid about what we both make together now. I would assume that, given the higher cost of living in Vancouver, the rate of pay there would be higher, but I do not know that for sure. It's something we'd find out as we get closer to moving time.

    Also, how are schools in the area? I've got my associates and begun working on my B.S., which I can continue to do long-distance if necessary, but obviously transferring would be better.

    Last, just a quick shout of thanks. This information is a lot to take in, but it is seriously helpful.

    Alberta to B.C is like Flordia to Texas... it's a world of difference.

    There's two universities in B.C... Simon Frasier and University of B.C. Everyone wants to get into UBC and it's very competative. Simon Fraiser is good for Computer Graphic Design thou.

    There's way more than two universities in B.C., actually. In the GVRD, there are two research intensive universities, and those are the University of B.C. and Simon Fraser University (UBC and SFU respectively). There are also a number of smaller, undergraduate colleges and universities like Vancouver Community College, Langara College, Capilano College, Douglas, and Kwantlen Polytechnic. Then there's the British Columbia Institute of Technology, which is both a trade school and a polytechnic university.

    If art is your thing, you could try Emily Carr University, which is a university for fine arts (mostly painting and such).

    Outside of the GVRD there are a number of universities, colleges, and polytechnics to meet your needs. Mostly they are public institutions, as are all of the institutions that I've listed, which means tuition is ridicuously cheap by American standards but still expensive when compared to other provinces (Québec and the Maritimes).

    UBC is the largest in the province and has the 'best' all around reputation for most things undergrad...But universities and colleges in Canada are not a all like those in the U.S. when it comes to rankings or tiers. It's all very program specific.

    saggio on
    3DS: 0232-9436-6893
  • Descendant XDescendant X Skyrim is my god now. Outpost 31Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Decius wrote: »
    Yeah, never ask an Albertan about a British Columbian. They might as well be different countries.

    Actually this is good for the OP. Canada is very regional, and there are differences in culture from province to province. Living in VT you might find B.C. a very different attitude. Go into it with an open mind and you'll be fine.

    Kind of like the U.S., I suppose. My parents live in Alabama now, I have family in Illinois, and I was originally born near Poughkeepsie, NY. The environments are obviously different, but the culture differences are incredible.

    Don't get me wrong, I've lived in Vermont most of my life (20 years of it), and I have no doubt that moving to Vancouver would be a major culture shock. I'm preparing myself for that, and I understand keeping an open mind. That's easy. Honestly, it was mostly the border crossing with all our shit that I was more worried about. We can leave our handgun behind (sell it, more likely), but the pets were a bigger deal. If that's as easy as it sounds (and by the links provided, it looks like it is), then no problem.

    As for her pay, I should describe the situation a bit better. If she were to move in to this position at their location here, she would be getting paid about what we both make together now. I would assume that, given the higher cost of living in Vancouver, the rate of pay there would be higher, but I do not know that for sure. It's something we'd find out as we get closer to moving time.

    Also, how are schools in the area? I've got my associates and begun working on my B.S., which I can continue to do long-distance if necessary, but obviously transferring would be better.

    Last, just a quick shout of thanks. This information is a lot to take in, but it is seriously helpful.

    Alberta to B.C is like Flordia to Texas... it's a world of difference.

    There's two universities in B.C... Simon Frasier and University of B.C. Everyone wants to get into UBC and it's very competative. Simon Fraiser is good for Computer Graphic Design thou.

    SFU is also good for Criminology. The only other school in BC that offers a Crim degree is the University College of the Fraser Valley.

    Descendant X on
    Garry: I know you gentlemen have been through a lot, but when you find the time I'd rather not spend the rest of the winter TIED TO THIS FUCKING COUCH!
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    Yeah, like I said, it is mostly property crime that is a problem, not the violent kinds.

    As far as pay, don't try to guess before you get an offer. Software devs here in van typically make about 30% less than they do in seattle, for example.

    Doc on
  • JamesJames Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    One thing to point out: our post secondary tuition costs are subsidized. It's one benefit of higher taxes.

    However! Foreigners don't necessarily get to reap those benefits, and if you're here on a work visa you'll most likely have to attend as an international student, which jacks the price up. Its still probably not comparable to the price of education down south, but I thought I'd mention it.

    Also, not all degrees will necessarily be recognized in the United States if you move back.

    James on
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    James wrote: »
    One thing to point out: our post secondary tuition costs are subsidized. It's one benefit of higher taxes.

    However! Foreigners don't necessarily get to reap those benefits, and if you're here on a work visa you'll most likely have to attend as an international student, which jacks the price up. Its still probably not comparable to the price of education down south, but I thought I'd mention it.

    Also, not all degrees will necessarily be recognized in the United States if you move back.

    My work visa specifically states that I am not allowed to take any courses at a university.

    Doc on
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    So, I was in my local Save On yesterday and Doc is right, 6 bucks for the family size box of cheerios. Save On isn't usually that pricey for that sort of thing, so I don't know what the fuck happened there. However, grocery prices are probably about the same across Canada. When I moved to Halifax for a couple of years, I thought cost of food might be cheaper, smaller city, lower economy, etc. No such luck.

    To the OP, do not make any assumptions that your credits from your US school will transfer. You will need to contact the colleges or universities here you are interested in to get a true ruling.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • SwashbucklerXXSwashbucklerXX Swashbucklin' Canuck Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Doc wrote: »
    James wrote: »
    One thing to point out: our post secondary tuition costs are subsidized. It's one benefit of higher taxes.

    However! Foreigners don't necessarily get to reap those benefits, and if you're here on a work visa you'll most likely have to attend as an international student, which jacks the price up. Its still probably not comparable to the price of education down south, but I thought I'd mention it.

    Also, not all degrees will necessarily be recognized in the United States if you move back.

    My work visa specifically states that I am not allowed to take any courses at a university.

    Yeah, you're probably only going to qualify as an international student until/unless you get permanent residency. Best to inquire directly with some Canadian universities about transferring and potential costs, and keep in mind that you'd probably have trouble securing a loan.

    I'm still hearing people say that it's going to be difficult for you to get permission to work in Canada, and I just wanted to reiterate that if your wife has a work visa, you can apply for one as her accompanying family member, so it's not particularly difficult (though you should apply for it as soon as you possibly can).

    SwashbucklerXX on
    Want to find me on a gaming service? I'm SwashbucklerXX everywhere.
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2010
    I'm still hearing people say that it's going to be difficult for you to get permission to work in Canada, and I just wanted to reiterate that if your wife has a work visa, you can apply for one as her accompanying family member, so it's not particularly difficult (though you should apply for it as soon as you possibly can).

    That's good to hear. At least this way if she gets a decent offer, it can be on the table.

    Doc on
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