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Can't figure out these chords, help!

GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
edited August 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So i've been picking up some rumba flamenco for a few years now, and I stumbled across this fun sounding piece


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRPQ2Xc9NuQ


Problem is, I don't use a lot of barre chords when I play, so I can't figure out what these chords are! Can anyone help me out here?


On a side note, can anyone clue me in on how he's getting that partially muted strumming sound? I figured out the first chord, but I can't get it as simple sounding as him, and it has something to do with how he's bridging the barre instead of the strumming technique.


Anything helps!

Godfather on

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    XenosX_XenosX_ Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    It might be a little hard to play along with this video in general because this fellow's guitar is a bit out of tune. It might even be closer to Eb standard tuning instead of E standard, but I can't quite see how he's fretting things. Anyway, the basic idea of the chord progression (in an easier key) is thus:

    Em7 - x79787 - bar on fret 7
    Am9 - 575555 - bar on fret 5 (he plays the minor 9 extension as well as 575557)
    D - x57775 - bar on fret 5
    G - 355433 - bar on fret 3
    Cmaj7 - x35453 - bar on fret 3
    B7 - x24242 - bar on fret 2
    Cmaj7 - x35453 - bar on fret 3
    B7 - x24242 - bar on fret 2

    If you're not familiar with that notation, the numbers are what fret you should be playing for each string in the EADGBE conformation, and x is a muted string. So x79787 means that you are muting the low E string, playing the 7th fret on the A string, the 9th fret on the D string, the 7th fret on the G string, the 8th fret on the B string, and the 7th fret on the high E string. This is done by forming a bar with your index finger on the seventh fret (using the end of your finger to mute the low E string by having it just barely touch the string) and then using your middle finger the fret the B string and your ring finger to fret the D string.

    The muted strumming is basically a simple up down up down pattern, where the chord is played by depressing the strings fully or muted by resting your hand on the strings in the same position. So the syncopation is really in the fretting hand, not the strumming hand. It takes a decent amount of practice to get used to that sort of feel but after a while it becomes easy. I think the sound you refer to as the 'partially muted strumming sound' is just the acoustics of the guitar he's using. Not all acoustic guitars are made equal. If he's using nylon strings or something that's gonna give it a sort of folksy sound as opposed to the rather harsh sound of metal strings.

    Good luck learning/understanding dude!

    XenosX_ on
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    GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Wow, that was crazy helpful, i'm actually pretty impressed. Cheers dude!

    Godfather on
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    SheepSheep Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Depending on the guitar you have, you can mute the strings by resting your palm on the bridge.

    Sheep on
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