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White liberals and black schools

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    EgoEgo Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    The thing is, most liberals, at least rich liberals, go out of their way to make sure their kids don't go to schools that have significant numbers of black and hispanic students (and this is also true for well-off black liberals).

    I'm sure the same isn't true of rich republicans?

    Ego on
    Erik
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    anonymityanonymity __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    chasm wrote: »
    Organichu wrote: »
    oh my god why would you seek any jewish girl

    what have you done to yourself to make you hate yourself this much

    I have to agree with this. Been there, never want to do that ever again.

    New Jersey Jew, right? New Jersey Jews, like New Jersey anything, should be avoided. Jewish girls from other areas tend to be sweet, nebbish, and jocular. This is, of course, limited to the US. Israelis tend to be kind of odd, either due to the terrible parenting or the cafe botz.

    anonymity on
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    OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited August 2010
    i like israeli girls, even if their sexual tastes are a little unusual

    but yeah, jewish girls in like, nj/pa/ny... ugh

    Organichu on
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    poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Ego wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    The thing is, most liberals, at least rich liberals, go out of their way to make sure their kids don't go to schools that have significant numbers of black and hispanic students (and this is also true for well-off black liberals).

    I'm sure the same isn't true of rich republicans?

    Don't you mean most (privately) racist white people?

    Unless you have a stat that shows left-wing privately racist white people doing it more than right-wing privately racist white people.

    Or right-wing publically racist white people, whose preponderance does make meaningful analysis difficult.

    And anyway that is perhaps an assumption made to justify their decisions. E.g. 'I know it sounds bad, me pretending to be Catholic so my kid can go to a Catholic school in a white neighbourhood, but everyone else is doing it.'

    And since many other factors correlate to 'having significant numbers of black and hispanic students', such as 'the school doesn't have much money' how can you be sure which factor is causing the decision?

    We've had a nice long thread all dismissing the tacit racism of The Scribe's OP. Don't spoil it.

    poshniallo on
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    anonymityanonymity __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Organichu wrote: »
    i like israeli girls, even if their sexual tastes are a little unusual

    but yeah, jewish girls in like, nj/pa/ny... ugh

    My girlfriend works at a primarily Jewish camp. NJ girls are terrifying, even the Christians. NYC suburbs are almost as bad. PA varies widely. New England Jews follow the regional taste for moderation, so aren't nearly as needy as NJ suburbanites, and are probably the most studious people on the planet. NYC proper Jews tend to hold onto the thriftiness. All will poke fun at you endlessly, but generally mean no harm.

    The best idea of the non-tristate-suburb Jewish girl is the old depictions of the Jewish matriarch who tries to feed anyone who wanders into her sight, except with the passive-aggressiveness transmuted into geekyness.

    anonymity on
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    Der Waffle MousDer Waffle Mous Blame this on the misfortune of your birth. New Yark, New Yark.Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    My experience with montreal-area jewish girls gives me the impression that they are all geeky and incredibly attractive.



    As a strangely related aside, I recently found out that in addition to being native as all hell, my great, great, great grandmother was an african who married into the community, which promted one of those moments where you just feel a sense of awe about where your ancestors came from.

    Der Waffle Mous on
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    nstfnstf __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    And since many other factors correlate to 'having significant numbers of black and hispanic students', such as 'the school doesn't have much money' how can you be sure which factor is causing the decision?

    Money isn't the only factor.

    School a is in the suburbs. Most of the kids that go to it come from a similar background as your kid. It has very little violence, most kids are out to get a good education/go to college/join the service/learn a trade, and problems are at minimum.

    School b is in the city. Many of the kids come from very bad areas and broken homes. They bring these problems in with them to school. Youth gangs are common, violence is common, cops are almost always around, beatings based on race are common, most of the kids want to play sports for a living and many of them are already moving into the path of a career criminal.

    Where do you want your kid to go? Throwing money at the school isn't going to change the backgrounds of the students that are there, and almost all of their problems come from their home and their own neighborhood.

    No responsible parent is going to subject their kid to situation b if they can afford it.

    nstf on
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    anonymityanonymity __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    nstf wrote: »
    And since many other factors correlate to 'having significant numbers of black and hispanic students', such as 'the school doesn't have much money' how can you be sure which factor is causing the decision?

    Money isn't the only factor.

    School a is in the suburbs. Most of the kids that go to it come from a similar background as your kid. It has very little violence, most kids are out to get a good education/go to college/join the service/learn a trade, and problems are at minimum.

    School b is in the city. Many of the kids come from very bad areas and broken homes. They bring these problems in with them to school. Youth gangs are common, violence is common, cops are almost always around, beatings based on race are common, most of the kids want to play sports for a living and many of them are already moving into the path of a career criminal.

    Where do you want your kid to go? Throwing money at the school isn't going to change the backgrounds of the students that are there, and almost all of their problems come from their home and their own neighborhood.

    No responsible parent is going to subject their kid to situation b if they can afford it.

    A larger problem is that minorities don't see much of a benefit from degrees, as the gap between whites and blacks actually increases up the education ladder until you get to the very top.

    anonymity on
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    JuliusJulius Captain of Serenity on my shipRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Hoz wrote: »
    I am pro-curly haired jewish girls.

    I am pro any-haired Jewish girls.

    But hair is definitely requisite. Except on arms and legs.

    I'm pretty much pro any type of girls.

    Julius on
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    SniperGuySniperGuy SniperGuyGaming Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    poshniallo wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Well it's partially the fault of the teachers. A lot of the low income crappy schools have crappy teachers because they can't afford to attract good teachers. Thus they spiral into terribleness. And coincidentally, are full of minorities.


    No blame, but it's a factor, certainly.

    If the school doesn't have money to pay the best teachers, then it's not the fault of the teachers at all, but the fault of whatever made the school have no money.

    Pay peanuts, get monkeys is the old saying.

    I see managers making the same mistake where I work. We reduce salaries, over time the quality of our employees drops, and then the management complain about them and blame everything on them.

    Well the teachers in part get to pick where they want to teach. In my educ classes several professors seemed to be trying to shame us into teaching at poor schools, despite the money. Really care and all that. You're right though, certainly that is mostly the fault of whatever made the school have no money.

    SniperGuy on
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    HozHoz Cool Cat Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Julius wrote: »
    Hoz wrote: »
    I am pro-curly haired jewish girls.

    I am pro any-haired Jewish girls.

    But hair is definitely requisite. Except on arms and legs.

    I'm pretty much pro any type of girls.
    Well, there are quite a few unappealing possibilities. So we'll have to diverge right there.

    Hoz on
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    ShyftedShyfted Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    anonymity wrote: »
    A larger problem is that minorities don't see much of a benefit from degrees, as the gap between whites and blacks actually increases up the education ladder until you get to the very top.

    I'm white and dropped out of college twice while having a GPA above 3.7 and the head of the Psychology/Philosophy departments loving me to all ends, but I couldn't afford a 2nd semester each time. I don't see the benefit of a BS in Psych or Philosophy. Hell, I almost wish I never went because I'd now have another 40+k in liquid funds.

    I don't disagree with your notion that certain groups of people, not necessarily based on race, but more on socioeconomic issues and their own personal parenting consider a higher education not being useful. As of right now, even to those who could achieve a degree, it's not really financially worth it. Ever tried to get any sort of financial help while your stepdad owns his own business, which is in debt, and your family actually owns a decent house, which is on it's 2nd mortage? Sorry, none of those things factor into what you're qualified for regarding aid. They make enough to pay the bills, so even after paying half your own HS bill they should also be expected to shell out 10's of thousands of dollars a year from some magical savings.

    I refused to learn about something I enjoyed that would inevitably leave me with monumental debt. Do I honestly really love Philosophy, yes. Am I willing to still be in crazy debt because I wanted to learn? Nope. I don't see the benefit of the degree aside from jobs that want me to have a degree. Yes, that may be a hindrance, but I feel the actual work I put out proves much more than a degree when it comes down to it.

    Shyfted on
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    VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Shyfted wrote: »
    I don't see the benefit of the degree aside from jobs that want me to have a degree. Yes, that may be a hindrance, but I feel the actual work I put out proves much more than a degree when it comes down to it.
    Shyfted wrote: »
    the actual work I put out proves much more than a degree

    Do you not actually work toward a degree? It takes work-- and then you get a degree.

    Part of that degree is your ability to work (and put up with the bullshit that comes with all work.)

    VeritasVR on
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    poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    SniperGuy wrote: »
    Well it's partially the fault of the teachers. A lot of the low income crappy schools have crappy teachers because they can't afford to attract good teachers. Thus they spiral into terribleness. And coincidentally, are full of minorities.


    No blame, but it's a factor, certainly.

    If the school doesn't have money to pay the best teachers, then it's not the fault of the teachers at all, but the fault of whatever made the school have no money.

    Pay peanuts, get monkeys is the old saying.

    I see managers making the same mistake where I work. We reduce salaries, over time the quality of our employees drops, and then the management complain about them and blame everything on them.

    Well the teachers in part get to pick where they want to teach. In my educ classes several professors seemed to be trying to shame us into teaching at poor schools, despite the money. Really care and all that. You're right though, certainly that is mostly the fault of whatever made the school have no money.

    I agree with you, but I wouldn't even use the word 'mostly'.

    Any one teacher being altruistic can help things, but over time what you get what you pay for. People can care, but then they have kids themselves so they have to provide for those kids etc etc.

    Being unwilling to do a harder job for less money doesn't make anyone bad.

    Any individual blips from altruism, selfishness or really anything will even out over time. Eventually the quality of the teachers (who come and go of course) will be related to what the school pays and some other factors to do with the school (nice place to live etc).

    The school is the constant, and the teachers change, so any overall trend in teacher quality will be caused by the school, not the teachers.

    There's probably an economic name for this phenomenon but I'm afraid I don't know.

    poshniallo on
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    ShyftedShyfted Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    Shyfted wrote: »
    I don't see the benefit of the degree aside from jobs that want me to have a degree. Yes, that may be a hindrance, but I feel the actual work I put out proves much more than a degree when it comes down to it.
    Shyfted wrote: »
    the actual work I put out proves much more than a degree

    Do you not actually work toward a degree? It takes work-- and then you get a degree.

    Part of that degree is your ability to work (and put up with the bullshit that comes with all work.)

    Do you have an actual job with a hierarchy of bosses and clients? Cause that amount of bullshit is much more than anything you'll have to put up with for a degree.

    Also, regarding the general requirement classes I took in college/university, they were a complete joke even when I went from La Salle College High School to La Salle University. I learned enough in the high school class to sleep through the college class I was paying thousands of dollars for. This was in the same state so it's not like I should I have expected lower expectation based on where I had come from and was currently. The Brotherers de La Salle really disappointed me here aside from the few who really gave a shit like Brother Art who thankfully is an Education Professor.

    Shyfted on
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    Hockey JohnstonHockey Johnston Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    If people are going to get degrees just to prove that they're responsible and punctual, I say we give them out to WalMart workers after their 4th year. A hell of a lot cheaper than what we're doing now.

    Kinda sad, really. HS should be the 'can you show up and do this' test, whereas an undergrad should really prove that you're capable of higher level analysis. We've shifted the whole scale downwards, and it's made our standards near-nonsensical.

    Hockey Johnston on
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    JuliusJulius Captain of Serenity on my shipRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Hoz wrote: »
    Julius wrote: »
    Hoz wrote: »
    I am pro-curly haired jewish girls.

    I am pro any-haired Jewish girls.

    But hair is definitely requisite. Except on arms and legs.

    I'm pretty much pro any type of girls.
    Well, there are quite a few unappealing possibilities. So we'll have to diverge right there.

    While I admit that there might be certain combinations of traits that are unappealing, I think almost all of those combinations are sort of impossible.

    Sure, redheaded black girls are not my thing but should one worry about that?

    Julius on
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    ShyftedShyfted Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    If people are going to get degrees just to prove that they're responsible and punctual, I say we give them out to WalMart workers after their 4th year. A hell of a lot cheaper than what we're doing now.

    Kinda sad, really. HS should be the 'can you show up and do this' test, whereas an undergrad should really prove that you're capable of higher level analysis. We've shifted the whole scale downwards, and it's made our standards near-nonsensical.

    Agreed, and at the same time, with the ridiculous rise in cost of college, what are we supposed to do? Once you finish college, if you didn't get a full scholarship, you're looking at the highest paying job you can get because you have a shitload of debt and the job market sucks. Right now you probably have at least 3 people in your area who are more qualified than you that are unemployed and will take a paycut for a job. And businesses are free to exploit that right now. Why pay someone right out of college a basic wage when you have people with experience that have families and are desperate for a job?

    I'll willingly admit that as an employer I'm looking for reliable people, but I also want people who are willing to stick with the company for a few years in order to get to salary and potential bonuses. I don't want to waste time paying a new employee who will be gone in a few months/2-3 years before I can actually rely on that person to expand my business (and for the most part it will take at least 2 years for them to be competent enough with their own crew). I need a supervisor that can run crews and will be around, not just throwing away cash on guys who won't be around long enough to earn their keep even for part time stuff.

    Shyfted on
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    Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    anonymity wrote: »
    A larger problem is that minorities don't see much of a benefit from degrees, as the gap between whites and blacks actually increases up the education ladder until you get to the very top.
    That's an odd thought process. Maybe a black guy with a college degree isn't going to be as well off as a white guy with the same degree, but he's still going to be significantly better off than if he didn't have the degree.

    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    Modern Man on
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    chasmchasm Ill-tempered Texan Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Ego wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    The thing is, most liberals, at least rich liberals, go out of their way to make sure their kids don't go to schools that have significant numbers of black and hispanic students (and this is also true for well-off black liberals).

    I'm sure the same isn't true of rich republicans?

    Well, they're really the same. Just that one feels more guilty about being rich than the other.

    chasm on
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    VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    Agreed on this point, unfortunate as it may be. I've also had the non-pleasure of working with this mindset since 2008.

    VeritasVR on
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    Really, this kind of thing happens in a lot of different ways depending on the local culture. People are very often pushed into directions that they have no desire to be in, and are punished for seeking their own ideals, regarding just about any life goal you can name; some people get pushed into the sciences or various service sectors when they belong in the arts, others are dragged down from high-paying positions because those around them cannot stand to be surpassed or because they otherwise have some chip on their shoulder. A family of doctors and lawyers may disown their kid for becoming a construction worker (a rather well-paying job if you do it right), simply because it's not medicine or law.

    Incenjucar on
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    anonymityanonymity __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    anonymity wrote: »
    A larger problem is that minorities don't see much of a benefit from degrees, as the gap between whites and blacks actually increases up the education ladder until you get to the very top.
    That's an odd thought process. Maybe a black guy with a college degree isn't going to be as well off as a white guy with the same degree, but he's still going to be significantly better off than if he didn't have the degree.

    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    But by less of a degree than his white peers, which means he has less incentive to try for the few college positions and scholarships that are up for grabs. We already have plenty of whites deciding not to try, imagine what it's like when you can't even reap the benefits whites expect.

    anonymity on
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    IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    anonymity wrote: »
    But by less of a degree than his white peers, which means he has less incentive to try for the few college positions and scholarships that are up for grabs. We already have plenty of whites deciding not to try, imagine what it's like when you can't even reap the benefits whites expect.

    Combines nicely with the "If I can't get ALL of it I don't want ANY of it" mentality that plagues the world, and also increases the risk/reward problem for more niche career paths.

    Incenjucar on
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    ElJeffeElJeffe Roaming the streets, waving his mod gun around.Moderator, ClubPA Mod Emeritus
    edited August 2010
    This is not the What Kind of Girls Do You Like? thread, guys.

    Knock it the fuck off.

    ElJeffe on
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    Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator Mod Emeritus
    edited August 2010
    anonymity wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    anonymity wrote: »
    A larger problem is that minorities don't see much of a benefit from degrees, as the gap between whites and blacks actually increases up the education ladder until you get to the very top.
    That's an odd thought process. Maybe a black guy with a college degree isn't going to be as well off as a white guy with the same degree, but he's still going to be significantly better off than if he didn't have the degree.

    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    But by less of a degree than his white peers, which means he has less incentive to try for the few college positions and scholarships that are up for grabs. We already have plenty of whites deciding not to try, imagine what it's like when you can't even reap the benefits whites expect.

    i suspect that these numbers are kind of skewed by:

    a) the fact that working-class non-degreed jobs are roughly equally shitty whether you're black or white

    and

    b) upper-class white people whose degrees are just formalities before they're drawn into their high-salaried sinecure

    Irond Will on
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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    In Milwaukee, you're more likely to get a working class non degree job as a white guy with a felony conviction than as a black guy with a clean criminal record, if my Sociology textbook is to be believed

    Not sure how relevant that is, but it's a factoid I randomly memorized and saw an opportunity to release it into the wild

    override367 on
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    SamSam Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Erich Zahn wrote: »
    This Scribe guy is from 4chan.

    *snip*

    Please ban him.

    fixed

    Sam on
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    nstfnstf __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    Modern Man wrote: »
    I think part of the problem for a lot of poor people in this country is that they live in a culture that doesn't value education. Poor white folks get labelled as "uppity" by the people around them if they go after an education. Poor black kids get accused of "acting white." It's a pretty vicious circle in such communities. It's a foreign mindset for me, coming from a background where getting a college degree was just assumed.

    Really, this kind of thing happens in a lot of different ways depending on the local culture. People are very often pushed into directions that they have no desire to be in, and are punished for seeking their own ideals, regarding just about any life goal you can name; some people get pushed into the sciences or various service sectors when they belong in the arts, others are dragged down from high-paying positions because those around them cannot stand to be surpassed or because they otherwise have some chip on their shoulder. A family of doctors and lawyers may disown their kid for becoming a construction worker (a rather well-paying job if you do it right), simply because it's not medicine or law.

    Societal expectations are a bitch. I knew plenty of people growing up that were utterly miserable because of pressure to get into a certain school and fall into x career path. Both my parents are in the sciences and both have MBAs. Out of the four kids my old sister became an architect (parents happy), older brother a commercial artist (not happy about that one), younger sister got a degree in journalism (still epic rants about how worthless that is), and I never finished college and became a sysadmin (my parents are still confused how that works and on what I actually do).

    My sister is of course struggling to find a job, so my parents solution... back to school! But now she's finding out, along with all her friends, that 0 work experience with a masters is just as bad as 0 work experience with a BS. :lol:

    nstf on
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    The Black HunterThe Black Hunter The key is a minimum of compromise, and a simple, unimpeachable reason to existRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Your sister never got so much as a burger flipping job?

    The Black Hunter on
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    Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Your sister never got so much as a burger flipping job?
    That's not really something you put on your resume when applying for white collar positions. I think nstf is referring to relevant work experience in her desired field.

    Modern Man on
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    GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    emnmnme wrote: »
    GungHo wrote: »
    I started out in a school that was about ~65% black, ~20% hispanic (I am white) and in third grade my parents white flighted me and my sister to a school that was ~95% white. It freaked me out. I wanted to know where all the black people went. I felt betrayed.

    95% white public school? ... the Woodlands?

    I actually grew up closer to the LATX border (Beaumont-Port Arthur area). There are bedroom communities in between those two cities. The demographics have changed a lot in the last few years, though. When I was growing up, there was a very small black area of the town just south of the high school... maybe 5~6 houses. So, in my school there were maybe 1~2 black kids. There were also a few Vietnamese kids bussed in from northern Port Arthur, and a few Filipinos and Indians hanging about. Nowadays, there are a lot of hispanics living there. The white families have flighted out west toward Winnie and Fanette or far north into Jasper. There was some movement east, but that was all curtailed by the various hurricanes.

    GungHo on
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    nstfnstf __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Modern Man wrote: »
    Your sister never got so much as a burger flipping job?
    That's not really something you put on your resume when applying for white collar positions. I think nstf is referring to relevant work experience in her desired field.

    Yeah pretty much. I mean, she baby sat a couple times, and I think did a stint doing something over the summer, but no actual work experience.

    Having a degree in journalism doesn't make you a journalist.

    nstf on
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    HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Tell her to look for internships. Failing that, tell her to bitch at her alma mater until they find her internships.

    Hacksaw on
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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Wait you can get jobs with degrees in journalism? I thought they only hired journalists based on how much you could rile people up for men and for women how blond and pretty you are, outliers like Maddow notwithstanding.

    override367 on
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    DuffelDuffel jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    A journalism degree ought to be at least as good as any other generic college degree - probably better, since language skills, communicating in a concise and accurate manner, etc. are pretty valuable to employers.

    Not everybody can work for the NYT or a national news outlet but you wouldn't think it would be impossible to get a job on at a smaller-circulating local paper (whose circulations have been hurt less by the internet), or at least answering the phone at Dunder Mifflin. Of course, a lot of those places wouldn't be hiring now because of the terrible economy but that's true with every field.

    Duffel on
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    override367override367 ALL minions Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Isn't a generic college degree worth about as much as a Denny's coupon these days? Maybe I'm just disheartened because I get no end of shit for going to college and not working retail somewhere

    override367 on
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    Modern ManModern Man Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    Isn't a generic college degree worth about as much as a Denny's coupon these days? Maybe I'm just disheartened because I get no end of shit for going to college and not working retail somewhere
    People with college degrees still have a lower unemployment rate than people with only a high school degree or less. Maybe a general liberal arts bachelors is worth less than a degree in chemical engineering, but you're still better off than someone who just graduated high school. At the very least, your resume might be looked at by HR before getting thrown in the trash.

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    DuffelDuffel jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    A college degree isn't worth near as much as it used to be, but these days if you don't have one you're going to have a pretty hard time getting your foot in the door to any kind of job that doesn't involve manual labor or operating heavy equipment.

    Not that there's anything wrong with those kinds of jobs, of course.

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    anonymityanonymity __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2010
    Duffel wrote: »
    A journalism degree ought to be at least as good as any other generic college degree - probably better, since language skills, communicating in a concise and accurate manner, etc. are pretty valuable to employers.

    Not everybody can work for the NYT or a national news outlet but you wouldn't think it would be impossible to get a job on at a smaller-circulating local paper (whose circulations have been hurt less by the internet), or at least answering the phone at Dunder Mifflin. Of course, a lot of those places wouldn't be hiring now because of the terrible economy but that's true with every field.

    Or any research department.

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