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I love geology/geography [Solved]

starmanbrandstarmanbrand Registered User regular
edited August 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
During my final semester at JC, I took my physical science/lab class and took Physical Geography. I say this without hesitation: I loved it. If I had taken it my first couple of semesters, I would probably not be an accounting major right now.

I'm taking my final for my natural disasters class today and I just don't want it to end. I want to keep learning about this stuff.

Anyone out there know of good online resources for geographic/geologic information and news? I really want to expand my knowledge of this area but don't have the credit space available to take any more classes on the subject.

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    RadicalTurnipRadicalTurnip Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    http://geology.com/

    Is that the type of thing your looking for? They have a news section.

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    starmanbrandstarmanbrand Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I had looked there before, but was turned off by its generic spam-site look. Their news section looks pretty up to date, though. Pretty nice, actually.

    I used to read http://www.earthmagazine.org/ but stopped after it seemed like they didn't add content very frequently.

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    PaleosaurPaleosaur Registered User new member
    edited August 2010
    I'm really glad you're interested!

    The USGS website is a really good tool to use to look up geological information of a specific area. They will give you everything from maps to descriptions. They also have tons of geology in the news articles, and other interesting links.

    http://www.usgs.gov/ (USGS Website)

    GSA (Geological Society of America) has a great website also. It is a group where geologists publish their latest research and present them at yearly meetings. If you browse around you can find several scientific journal articles about any topic in geology. They can be really in depth though, so if you want to start with more general topics I would recommend exploring the USGS website.

    http://www.geosociety.org/ (GSA Website)

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    Niceguy MyeyeNiceguy Myeye Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    One thing that you may look into is some Sate or National Parks. There was one near where I lived that had a self-guided hike. It was pretty interesting. Basically, you had a pamphlet and along the trail there were posts with letters on them that would match up and explain what you were seeing.

    The pamphlet would give the details of the how the rock bald formed on the mountain or what it means that all the trees are in a line in this one spot in the middle of the rock. It combined things other than geology, such as botany and conservation, but it was pretty cool overall.

    The really cool thing about a self guided hike like this is that you get to see first hand exactly what is being described. I realize that this isn't quite what you're asking for, but I think you would find it interesting if you could find a good one near your area.

    Oh, this may start you out. This park has a guided tour of the San Andreas Fault.

    http://parks.lacounty.info/Parkinfo.asp?URL=cms1_033377.asp&Title=Devil%27s

    There's a self guided tour at Joshua Tree Park too:
    http://www.trails.com/tcatalog_trail.aspx?trailid=BGS130-092

    One disclaimer is I know NOTHING of California, so this may be too far for you to drive. The good news is well, the fault is a big one and you'll probably be more able to find places near you.

    Niceguy Myeye on
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    GrizzledGrizzled Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    MIT's OpenCourseWare program lets you "take" MIT classes online. By "take" I mean you get to follow along with the material, and you can see the assignments, but you don't get to turn anything in and of course you don't get any credits. They provide all the lecture notes, labs, assignments, and sometimes podcasts of the lectures are available. Might be perfect if you have time in your schedule but can't fit the credit hours into your academic plan.

    http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

    A quick search shows there are plenty of intro/intermediate level geography and geology courses available.

    Grizzled on
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    starmanbrandstarmanbrand Registered User regular
    edited August 2010
    I will definately check out that geosociety site, even if most of it will be over my head. Thank you!

    And MIT courses sound good once i get some more free time, I'm booking marking those.

    I'll have to check with local parks around me to see if they have any tours like that. I was busy all summer with classes and didn't find time to go camping locally.

    Thanks, I think this has provided me enough to keep my interest growing.

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