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Building the Ultimate Car/Backpack emergency kit

IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
edited January 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So, I'm a fairly new driver (about a year) I waited a long time and I now love it. My little 2002 lancer isnt fancy, but its getting the job done.

Emergency/survivalist kits always seemed cool to me, and I'd like to build a functional one for my trunk. I actually want to build two kits, the end of the world backpack, where-in I can grab a backpack and be prepared to hobo-it up, and the everything is in the fucking car kit, where in I can jump in my car and feel like I can go anywhere.

Anyways this is sorta just a fun extra curricular activity for me, oddly enough, but I'd like some help brainstorming ideas. I'd like both kits to be highly functional and not just zombie kits.

For the car, the range is "This towel in my trunk is convenient" -> "Oh fuck, I'm stuck in my car in a wasteland." The backpack range is "I'll be okay for this impromptu sleep over" -> "Major natural disaster? thank god I have my hobo it up pack!"

Help me H/A.



Heres my list so far.

My Car Is My rock

Stuff in car right now:
-Towel
-Road Flares
-Window Breaker thing (for accidental car submersion)
-Standard GPS (garmin)
-Colgate wisps (mini toothbrushes)
-Toothpicks.
-a shit ton of pens
-Quilt for concert sitting/warmth.
-Jumper Cables

Stuff I need
-Multitool (suggestions would be nice)
-Perhaps a paper map of the US for major roads
-a compass
-Some sort of flat tool kit to keep the trunk organized
-Butane Lighter
-small first aid kit with instructional info on tending injuries.

People Have suggested:
Bungie Cables
100 ft rope
2 ton tow chain
A Gun (not getting a gun, though)
Solar/crank cell phone charger.
magnesium




Backpack for the ages
Havent picked out an actual bag yet.

Stuff I need:
-Lighter
-Small simple first aid kid
-secondary multitool
-sporks
-Notebook.


Product suggestions and speculative end of the world/hobo advice appreciated.


(whole list formated for my later reference)
CAR
Car Basics
Window Breaker/Seatbelt cutter
Spare tire
Tire Pressure Gage
Jumper Cables
Bungie Cables
Road flares
GPS
US Map of basic highways
Compass
2 ton tow chain


Personal Hygiene
Tooth Brushes
Tooth Picks
Floss
Tampons
Menstrual cup
Change of clothes
-Socks
-Under wear
-Warm cotton shirt
-Sweatshirt
-Pants
Condoms
Small bar of soap

Food
A field guide to edible plants/fungi
Trail Mix
Jerky
Spork
Water

Tools
Entrenching tool
Multitool
Hatchet
Folding saw
Pens
Permanent Marker
Waterproof Matches
Magnesium
Lighter
Kindling blocks
Net
Galvanized locking wire
Flashlight.
Canvas Tarp
Portable Jumpstarter

First Aid
Basic Kit
Thermal blanket

Backpack
Personal Hygiene
Tooth Brush
Tooth Picks
Floss
Tampons
Change of clothes
Condoms
Small bar of soap

Tools
Multitool
Flashlight
Razor Blade
Lighter
Small compass
Small mirror

Iruka on
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Posts

  • KalTorakKalTorak Way up inside your butthole, Morty. WAAAAY up inside there.Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Depending on where your car-pack is, you might want the window-breaker separate, within arm's reach of the driver's seat, along with a seat-belt cutter.

    KalTorak on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    Oh, a few things go in the glove box/ arm rest, sorry. The window breaker is in the arm rest. the toothpicks and toothbrushes are in the glove box (The shit ton of pens is in there too), where I will probably also keep the multitool.

    I will have to look into a seatbelt cutter, I havent heard of that.

    Edit:
    Oh, actually, my window breaker is one of these:
    breakerthing.jpg
    I guess the blade on the bottom is for seatbelts.

    Iruka on
  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    You may want a magnesium stick for a fire starter in the event your lighters run out of fluid.

    Since this is just a for fun thing, you might want to watch Survivorman or any of Ray Mears's stuff to get ideas.

    Reznik on
    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    -Bungee cords
    -100 feet of rope
    -2 ton tow chain

    These three things have been in every car I've ever owned, and I've used every single one multiple times. The tow chain especially, you may be thinking "Like my Lancer could pull anything out of a ditch" and you're right, but what if you're the one stuck in a ditch, and someone with a truck pulls up yet they have no tow chain?

    matt has a problem on
    nibXTE7.png
  • MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Well, you're for sure going to want to throw a rifle or a shotgun into the mix - you never know when that zombie uprising or the apocalypse are going to sneak up on you.


    Also: jumper cables.

    MushroomStick on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    Added jumper cables to the list of stuff in the car already, I forgot I had those. I also have a space saver type tire in the trunk.

    For now, I'll keep the kits everything but a gun. I'm not a huge gun person, and wouldn't want one in my trunk.

    Some sort of Spade might be a good idea, though.

    Bungie cords/rope/tow chain are good suggestions, so I'll add those to the list.

    Iruka on
  • WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Maybe a small solar charger - to charge a cellphone/your gps if you get lost and run out of power.

    Wezoin on
  • MimMim You can be the ripest, juiciest peach in the world and there's still going to be somebody that hates peaches.Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I was thinking a magnesium stick too! Like this : Stick!

    edit: Solar Charger

    Mim on
  • KalTorakKalTorak Way up inside your butthole, Morty. WAAAAY up inside there.Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Iruka wrote: »
    Some sort of Spade might be a good idea, though.

    What are those collapsible shovels in TF2 called? Trenching tools?

    KalTorak on
  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    KalTorak wrote: »
    Iruka wrote: »
    Some sort of Spade might be a good idea, though.

    What are those collapsible shovels in TF2 called? Trenching tools?

    Entrenching Tool

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrenching_tool

    Raneados on
    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Glock, the gun people, make an excellent spade.

    http://www.glock.com/english/outdoor_entrench.htm

    DekuStick on
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    For the backpack (leaning towards the "Natural disaster" end of your spectrum):
    A good hatchet. You never know when you might need to chop fire wood or fell some small trees to build a lean too or something
    Flashlight and spare batteries for the flashlight, if you've got space: spare spare batteries. (the hand cranked ones work, but do you really want to be stuck cranking one of those every 10 minutes in the dark?)
    A good folding knife is always nice to have if you're gutting fish or other wildlife.
    A couple of spare lighters, some water proof matches, and a good flint/steel to start a fire. (any survival show will say the same thing in an emergency: Fire is life, it wards off animals, provides heat for cooking, sanitizing water and avoiding hypothermia, and can signal rescuers.)
    Some kind of kindling blocks or fire starters as well (try lighting wet wood on fire? not gonna happen)
    Small mirror (can be used to signal potential rescuers)
    Emergency pants/shirt in waterproof container (if you have to cross a river and it's cold out, you'll want something dry to get into afterwards). If you've got a vacuum packer
    A field guide to edible plants/fungi. I'd avoid eating wild mushrooms personally, but if it's that or starving it'd be nice to be reasonably sure you're not nomming on deadly fungus.
    Non perishable food. Clif bars, a bag of GORP, jerky, MREs if you've got space. Just so long as it's high-energy, low volume, long shelf life.
    Water purification tablets.

    For the car:
    Get a good sized Tupperware (or similar) container, fill it with cat litter or something similar for emergency traction to help you out of the snow.
    Emergency drinking water, a couple of liters at least.
    Emergency food (see above).

    see317 on
    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • November FifthNovember Fifth Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Hand Crank flashlight.
    Change of clothes plus shoes you can walk/hike in.
    Half Gallon of water for you or radiator. Rotate regularly.
    Condoms.

    November Fifth on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    Condoms.

    Wouldnt condoms be adversly effected by the fluctuating temperatures of a car? I guess these could go into the backpack, but I sorta consider condoms a perishable. But that does remind me that tampons should be on that list.


    That Glock Entrenching tool is pretty perfect, and surprisingly inexpensive.

    we do have a little vacuum thing in the kitchen, but I think we only have food bags for it. Even with out that, a spare shirt and underwear could go in the car double ziplocked, at least.

    Iruka on
  • FagatronFagatron Registered User
    edited December 2010
    This book and the finest Japanese Steel.

    Posting for the dot. I approve of this thread and will be referring to it after I get my car. I think everything I used to carry in my car has been mentioned.

    EDIT: Actually, no, it hasn't. Bugout gear isn't going to do you any good if your car won't run.

    Duct tape, giant roll, the strong black stuff. It's useful for car repair, like patching up a hose in a pinch, etc. Also baling wire for similar reasons, if something's falling off swear to god enough baling wire will hold it in place.

    Couple quarts of oil just in case; and a container of antifreeze/water mixture in case it ever overheats or your radiator springs a leak.

    Tire pressure gauge to make sure you're not running high or low on air, don't want a blowout.

    TOOLS. Doesn't have to be fancy, but pliers, needle nose pliers/wire cutters, adjustable wrench, a small socket wrench/set, screwdriver with a few different kinds of interchangeable bits in the handle. Feel free to throw anything else you might need for basic car maintenance in here.


    Personally I think the seat belt cutter/window smasher thing is kind of silly, but I carry a serrated knife everywhere that'd be a lot better at slashing a seatbelt than that thing, and the look of it didn't instill me with confidence in it's ability to smash through safety glass. Seems like a tire iron'd have more heft behind it.

    Which reminds me, if your car has room for it, get an ACTUAL spare tire instead of one of those stupid donut things. It's a small investment but you'll be glad you made it if you ever need it. Also make sure you've got a decent jack/tire iron in your car with you.

    Fagatron on
  • KitsunaKitsuna Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Something that I've just started keeping in my car is one of these.

    Portable Jump Starter and Air Compressor

    Useful if your battery dies and there are no cars nearby that you can get a jump start off of. A couple of weeks ago when I had to get to work at 5:00am and found that the extreme cold over the weekend had killed my battery, I found myself wishing I had one of these handy. Now I'll be prepared if it happens again.

    It also gives you a handy air compressor you can inflate your tires with if they're a bit low.

    You might also want a small jerry can that'll hold a couple of gallons of petrol. Could be useful if you're out in the country and can't get to a petrol station before you run out of fuel.

    Kitsuna on
    MGRSig2.jpg
  • FagatronFagatron Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Kitsuna wrote: »
    Something that I've just started keeping in my car is one of these.

    Portable Jump Starter and Air Compressor

    Useful if your battery dies and there are no cars nearby that you can get a jump start off of. A couple of weeks ago when I had to get to work at 5:00am and found that the extreme cold over the weekend had killed my battery, I found myself wishing I had one of these handy. Now I'll be prepared if it happens again.

    It also gives you a handy air compressor so you can inflate your tires with if they're a bit low.

    You might also want a small jerry can that'll hold a couple of gallons of petrol. Could be useful if you're out in the country and can't get to a petrol station before you run out of fuel.

    Oh man that thing is COOL. Don't even know how much I wish I would've had it when I was driving the old Toyota with vague-ish electrical problems.

    Carrying gas in a car is tricky because of the fumes, and the potential of ignition via static discharge; otherwise that's totally something else I would've listed.

    Fagatron on
  • HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I'll second the portable jump starter.

    They make smaller ones that hook up to your cigarette lighter... Don't get those. Mine takes forever to charge, has to be recharged periodically, and when you use it you have to let it sit hooked up for an hour before you can try to start the car. When it's ready you get ONE shot, and it's not a good shot, after witch you've been freezing your nuts off on the Zilwaukee Bridge for an hour.


    Nobody's mentioned fuses, but get fuses. The most annoying car problem I ever had was when the fuse on my windshield wipers blew during a storm.

    Hevach on
  • KitsunaKitsuna Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Fagatron wrote: »
    Carrying gas in a car is tricky because of the fumes, and the potential of ignition via static discharge; otherwise that's totally something else I would've listed.

    I've never carried petrol in my car, so I didn't know about that risk. Glad you pointed it out, since I have been thinking about starting. D:

    In that case, I'll change my recommendation to carrying an empty jerry can so you have something handy that you can use to easily carry petrol back to your vehicle with.

    Edit: Might want a small siphon pump or least a length of tubing to go with that so you can tap petrol from another car.

    Kitsuna on
    MGRSig2.jpg
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Gas can (make sure it's rated for gasoline)
    Quart of oil
    Gallon of distilled water (for mixing with engine coolant)

    You might also consider getting a repair manual for your car. This isn't necessarily for you, but for the helpful person who rolls up when you break down and is generally good with cars, but doesn't know your car.

    MKR on
  • DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Fagatron wrote: »
    Personally I think the seat belt cutter/window smasher thing is kind of silly, but I carry a serrated knife everywhere that'd be a lot better at slashing a seatbelt than that thing, and the look of it didn't instill me with confidence in it's ability to smash through safety glass. Seems like a tire iron'd have more heft behind it.

    I've tested a seat belt cutter and it sliced through the belt like nothing. The glass punches do their job aswell. That being said I wouldn't trust just any old life saving device. I'd go with something along the lines of the Benchmade Houdini Pro. I'll gladly pay the 40 dollars to know I'm not relying on a 5 dollar piece of shit I grabbed at a wal mart.

    DekuStick on
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    You mentioned not being a gun person, but you can pick up a cheap nautical flaregun with a few flares for around $25-$30.

    It's certainly one of those things you will never need until you really need it.

    SmokeStacks on
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  • corky842corky842 Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Along with the oil and coolant mentioned, get some transmission fluid.

    For the lighter, get a butane one and a spare can of fluid. The lighter fluid in the zippo-style lighters tends to evaporate.

    For the flashlight, here is a good, cheap, bright one that runs on a single AA battery.

    corky842 on
    Darmak wrote: »
    Something is wrong with me
  • IronKnuckle's GhostIronKnuckle's Ghost Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    A couple of things I keep in my car at all times include a decent ratchet set, and a portable work light such as this.

    You have a multitool listed, but I'd include one for each survival kit. For the backpack, grab a Leatherman-equivalent one that can be holstered on a belt or on the backpack's webbing. For the car, get a larger outdoors-oriented one.

    Another backpack item to include would be eating utensils, a lot of people like titanium ones for strength/weight purposes.

    IronKnuckle's Ghost on
  • UsagiUsagi Nah Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Blankets. The foil emergency kind, one for each, and also an old blanket for your car (it makes sitting on the ground a lot more comfortable, even if you're not using it for warmth)

    Also, if you wear glasses or contacts, stash an old pair of glasses in the emergency kit - boy does it suck to try and drive after one contact pops out of your eye.

    Usagi on
  • SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I got a flat Job-Mate tool kit, it has a pretty solid range of tools and its only a couple inches thick. Decent tools, especially in a pinch, wouldn't use them for dailies but for now and then they are perfect.

    The compressor/starter kit is pretty cool, there are other versions with inverters and outlets-even usb ports. I got one's with all of the above and gave them out for christmas.

    For a multitool, a Leatherman is a solid bet. There are knockoffs, but I'd get the brand- they last longer and the tools are meant to be used.

    A small spool of galvanized locking wire is awesome. Great tensile strength, easy to work with, and holds up to the heat in a way tape just can't, like re-attaching a muffler, fixing a broken linkage, broken springs, etc. Use in conjunction with your leatherman to do a shitload of stopgap repairs.

    See also, cable ties. I started using cable ties at work, 8 inch black w/ eyelet jobbies, and holy shit son, are they ever versatile. Supereasy to use, minimal to no tools required, durable, and you can daisy chain them for extra length when required. Again, use with leatherman to cinch things up tight, tuckaway wayward wires, use as clamps for glue/epoxy repairs, attach pretty much anything to anything else. A pack of 100 will do you for a long time, and once you start working with them they become the goto medium of choice for making shit stay where you want it.

    Oh and lighter fluid. Availible everywhere, and pretty amazing for making cookfires, survival fires etc. No need to muck about with sparkers and mag rods and kindling etc. Just small wood, big wood, spray, light and WOOMPH! Good to go.

    Sarcastro on
    Edcrab wrote: »
    "See," said Lucifer, "God's an asshole."
  • MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    A digital camcorder of some sort - to record your last words/will/etc. in case the emergency doesn't end well. Also could be used to document when some silly goose on their cellphone rear ends you and tries to claim not at fault later, I guess.

    MushroomStick on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    Thanks for the ideas so far, and links. How big are those portable jump starters? they do seem cool though, I will look for one.

    How little oil/coolant/transmission fluid could I keep in the car and have it be functional? I dont want huge bottles rolling around in the trunk. An empty gas can is a good Idea too. I'd hate to get to the gas and have nothing to carry it with. One day I'll have a hybrid car and just keep some french fry oil in the trunk.

    For me the note book works as a will, but I could do a small camera of some sort.

    Thanks for the leatherman recommendation too, they have an awful lot of options.


    Any quick tips on what constitutes as the optimum first aid kit?

    Iruka on
  • MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Iruka wrote: »
    Any quick tips on what constitutes as the optimum first aid kit?

    The first aid kits at work all have tourniquets and compression bandages, but no band-aids for some reason.

    MushroomStick on
  • DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I can't recommend the Leatherman Juice S2 enough for your backpack kit. I love it to death and carry it everywhere.

    DekuStick on
  • KitsunaKitsuna Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Iruka wrote: »
    Thanks for the ideas so far, and links. How big are those portable jump starters? they do seem cool though, I will look for one.

    The one I have will easily fit standing upright inside my boot and my car is pretty small.

    This picture should give you a rough idea of the size.

    Kitsuna on
    MGRSig2.jpg
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    A digital camcorder of some sort - to record your last words/will/etc. in case the emergency doesn't end well. Also could be used to document when some silly goose on their cellphone rear ends you and tries to claim not at fault later, I guess.

    All jokes aside, everyone should have one of those disposable cameras you get for $7 at the grocery store in their glove compartment.

    If you're ever in an accident the first thing you need to do (after ensuring there are no serious injuries) is take a ton of photographs of your car, the other car(s), the road, any skidmarks, the surrounding area, any injuries, etc.

    SmokeStacks on
    73CQcJZ.png
  • KitsunaKitsuna Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Iruka wrote: »
    Any quick tips on what constitutes as the optimum first aid kit?

    A quick look on Amazon turns up this first aid kit.

    It seems pretty comprehensive to me and you could always add in anything you might feel is missing from it.

    Kitsuna on
    MGRSig2.jpg
  • IronKnuckle's GhostIronKnuckle's Ghost Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    On the note of first aid kits: the kit itself is useful, but only as useful as your knowledge on how to use it! Check out first aid training classes in your area, hospitals and fire departments often have classes periodically, and you can always contact your local Red Cross chapter.

    Also nobody is complete without their Pocket Ref.

    IronKnuckle's Ghost on
  • yalborapyalborap Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    If you've got the room, a folding bicycle or scooter or something might be a decent thing to toss in your car(for if it breaks down and you can't get it up and running again), or strap to your hobo-pack. Some form of speed enhancement.

    yalborap on
  • bombardierbombardier Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    If you want to make a good fire starting bundle, get cotton balls and smother them in vaseline. They will light and burn for a few minutes even while wet. You can get a piece of bicycle tube, cut a length of a few inches and then two thin pieces to use as rubber bands to seal the tube. Put the vaseline cottonballs inside. The tubes keep the cotton dry and can also be burned as part of your tinder. You can also stuff a small $1 BIC lighter inside.

    I'd suggest a decent sized axe. Something with a lot of leverage. Get a filing bar to sharpen it as well. Too small and you won't be able to split wood very easily. Handle type is also important. Composites, metal, or plastic may be lighter, but a wooden one can be replaced if it happens to break by carving a new one.

    In addition to an axe: folding saw. Cut logs to length, then split with the axe. If you have very wet wood, you'll need bigger kindling in order to build a very hot fire to get to the point of burning soaked through stuff. Being able to split stuff gives you nice big chunks of fairly dry firewood.

    Shelter: those cheap blue tarps are good as they are light (and cheap) but better are canvas ones. The cheap ones get holes burned in them easily when setting up next to a campfire. Have some rope with you as well so you can tie it up.

    A roll of dental floss is great. You get a ridiculous length of pretty strong material for a few dollars and almost no space or weight. Snare wire is also good if you're stuck somewhere for a long time and need sources of food.

    Best form of water purification is boiling. Some sheets of clear plastic to build a solar still are also easy and light. You'll need multiple ones to produce enough water to survive on though.

    Signaling tools. A signaling mirror is the most effective at range. Whistles and smoke are useful but can get camouflaged by fog and ambient noise.

    Oh yeah, for the cold: wool is your friend. Artificial stuff like fleece is good, but you don't want to be next to a fire in something like that.

    Uhh, that's the basics: fire, shelter, water, signaling, food

    (I just had to do a survival course for school where we had to get a fire started with soaked west coast trees so I can tell you that an axe is the most valuable thing possible)

    bombardier on
    ?username=bombardactyl&theme=dark
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks The Myth, the Legend, the Bowman, the Shambler FuckerRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    bombardier wrote: »
    If you want to make a good fire starting bundle, get cotton balls and smother them in vaseline. They will light and burn for a few minutes even while wet. You can get a piece of bicycle tube, cut a length of a few inches and then two thin pieces to use as rubber bands to seal the tube. Put the vaseline cottonballs inside. The tubes keep the cotton dry and can also be burned as part of your tinder. You can also stuff a small $1 BIC lighter inside.

    Empty film canisters and drug bottles (both prescription and OTC) also make excellent tinder storage too. They're easy to find and very water resistant. An empty Centrum bottle filled with dryer lint makes a pretty good tinder case.

    SmokeStacks on
    73CQcJZ.png
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Duct tape.

    Forbe! on
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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited January 2011
    I'm going through and making a list, which is starting to look pretty good. Thanks for the help so far.
    CAR
    Car Basics
    Window Breaker/Seatbelt cutter
    Spare tire
    Tire Pressure Gage
    Jumper Cables
    Bungie Cables
    Road flares
    GPS
    US Map of basic highways
    Compass
    2 ton tow chain
    Empty Gas Can

    Personal Hygiene
    Tooth Brushes
    Tooth Picks
    Floss
    Tampons
    Menstrual cup
    Change of clothes
    -Socks
    -Under wear
    -Warm cotton shirt
    -Sweatshirt
    -Pants
    Condoms
    Small bar of soap

    Food
    A field guide to edible plants/fungi
    Trail Mix
    Jerky
    Spork
    Water

    Tools
    Entrenching tool
    Multitool
    duct tape
    Hatchet
    Folding saw
    Pens
    Permanent Marker
    Waterproof Matches
    Magnesium
    Lighter
    Kindling blocks
    Net
    Galvanized locking wire
    Flashlight
    Canvas Tarp
    Portable Jumpstarter

    First Aid
    Basic Kit
    Thermal blanket

    Backpack
    Personal Hygiene
    Tooth Brush
    Tooth Picks
    Floss
    Tampons
    Change of clothes
    Condoms
    Small bar of soap

    Tools
    Multitool
    Flashlight
    Razor Blade
    Lighter
    Small compass
    Small mirror
    Film canister of kindling
    Magnesium

    Food
    A field guide to edible plants/fungi
    Trail Mix
    Jerky
    Spork
    Canteen
    Squishy Bowl

    Iruka on
  • KitsunaKitsuna Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Your list is still missing an empty gas can.

    Kitsuna on
    MGRSig2.jpg
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