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Second Modem with Comcast

InvisibleInvisible Registered User regular
edited January 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
I'd like to have a wired connection to my second desktop. I have a cable right next to it, an extra cable modem and everything I need to just plug it in.

I use Comcast. I know have to register it with them, my problem is I can't get a straight answer on how much it will cost.

Phone rep said I'd have to open another line and be charged twice (not going to happen, but I don't think she quite understood).

In store rep at Best Buy (he works for Comcast corporate) said he wasn't 100% sure but he thought it was only something another $5 a month and just calling to register (to be clear he knew I wasn't talking about another cable box/dvr since we also talked about that separately).

Email rep didn't read my question and just told me they don't charge anything, only if I leased and that I'd just have to register the MAC address with them. However, I think he thought I was just going to replace a lease modem.

So does anyone here know? Is there a specific service I'm looking for? Is it even possible to have two cable modems on the same network? I'd just like to get off Wifi on my desktop since the connection has been spotty and running a cable from my router just isn't possible at the moment.

Invisible on

Posts

  • RhinoRhino Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    What do you want to do here; have 2 home computers connect to the internet?

    If you have an existing internet connection; you can share it across your network. It costs nothing extra and perfectly legit.

    Here I have: 2 windows computers, a unix server, my work laptop, my gf's netbook all running from 1 comcast connection.

    Basically all you need is a router and a switch.
    Router: https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Router

    Most consumer grade routers come with a switch (or hub) built in. If that is the case, all you need then is that router with integrated switch.

    The broad overview is:
    Connect internet to route, connect computers to router, configure router/network. Internet for all.

    A consumer grade router with integrated switch will run you between $20 and $200 USD.
    Any modern computer should already have a network interface card. Cabling will be around $5 to $30 or so.

    There are other ways of doing it; but generally that is the cheapest, easiest to setup and most reliable.
    You could use one computer for a router (would need 2 NICs) or get a wireless router (computers would need wireless cards), etc.

    Rhino on
    93mb4.jpg
  • KakodaimonosKakodaimonos Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    What are you exactly trying to do with this? Like Rhino mentions, just use a router if you want multiple computers to share the connection. Even with another line drop, you're still using the same connection and same headend node, so you'll still have the same issues with ping and latency since you're using the same gateway with both connections.

    Kakodaimonos on
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Like Rhino said, all you need is a router (I personally like Linksys. Netgear's good, too) and some cable. You don't need to register anything with Comcast, but you'll probably need to reset the modem after you hook the router up.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • khainkhain Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I think people are missing the point. The OP has a second computer in a different room with a cable outlet and while the router idea works in theory he doesn't want to run cat5 on the floor to this room. He's currently using WiFi and it isn't working out that well. Google seems to not give a conclusive answer where some say it should only cost an additional $5 and others say you have to pay for another account. You do however have other options as you could try 802.11n which gets better range than g and can be on a different band to limit interference or could try ethernet over power lines.

    khain on
  • KakodaimonosKakodaimonos Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Also, if this is through Comcast, you will need a second account for the second cable modem. You can't have two modems attached on the same account.

    Kakodaimonos on
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    You are missing one important fact...

    Regardless of how much it cost you are basically getting a second internet connection.

    You will not be on a LAN with your other computer.

    Anything you try to share will be dropped on to the internet and brought back in.

    This will be a pain in the ass to get the two computers to talk to one another - opening up alot of security issues and being dog slow compared to even spotty wireless.

    useless4 on
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    khain wrote: »
    I think people are missing the point. The OP has a second computer in a different room with a cable outlet and while the router idea works in theory he doesn't want to run cat5 on the floor to this room. He's currently using WiFi and it isn't working out that well. Google seems to not give a conclusive answer where some say it should only cost an additional $5 and others say you have to pay for another account. You do however have other options as you could try 802.11n which gets better range than g and can be on a different band to limit interference or could try ethernet over power lines.

    N has less range then G... it often "appears" stronger though because right now there is less interference in that spectrum .

    useless4 on
  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    You could have an electrician wallfish networking cable through the walls, too. Not sure what that costs.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • DehumanizedDehumanized Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    You should try an Ethernet Over Power kit

    like this one or whatever

    Dehumanized on
  • greydragongreydragon Registered User new member
    Guys, I have a cable account with one modem attached to it. I recently got tired of the "coitus interruptus" between my modem with is connected in the living room for a desktop and my laptop in my bedroom. The signal is horrible, so I got another cable modem/router, and just s and giggles, connect it to the cable outlet in the bedroom. It works and the WiFi signal is 4 times faster than the one in the living room. I do not use it all the time, but it does work.

  • greydragongreydragon Registered User new member
    By "coitus interruptus" I meant, the signal is interrupted so often or a get a very weak signal, that is not worth watching videos in my room.

  • MulletudeMulletude Registered User regular
    You should try an Ethernet Over Power kit

    like this one or whatever

    I do this for the xb1 in my bedroom and it seems to work just fine. Much faster than the wireless anyways.

    XBL-Dug Danger WiiU-DugDanger Steam-http://steamcommunity.com/id/DugDanger/
This discussion has been closed.