Options

hating college (am I alone?)

1246712

Posts

  • Options
    Indie WinterIndie Winter die Krähe Rudi Hurzlmeier (German, b. 1952)Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Langly wrote: »
    btw langly how do you define society

    like a characteristic national mindset

    or more along the lines of sub-urban society, inner city society, nationality based society, small town society, etc.

    because while you're right in saying that there are many people who'd consider going to collage or uni undesirable for many reasons, and would learn study a job or a trade that does not require that sort of education

    I believe that the "overall" society, that is, the society of the country, while exalting the common man, views the studious man as being more successful

    so while a person might be full of admiration for a person without a degree who makes it big, say, Mike and Jerry

    they'd still think going to collage or uni is a better way to advance oneself financially

    While there is definitely a popular image of going to college in media (like movies and tv shows and things), the actual places where a trade school is most important (in rural and highly urban areas), the culture very much revolves around getting a job and staying close to home and not valuing going away to get a degree. Upper middle class areas almost across the board value getting a degree because that is where most of those people come from, but that doesn't mean it's the majority view of the practice.

    well that is an interesting point: the value of higher education as perceived by the population and in comparison to the media projected image. Sounds like something worth doing a study on.

    Indie Winter on
    wY6K6Jb.gif
  • Options
    skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Like others are saying, how college goes really varies from person to person.
    Also, college isn't for everyone. And that's just fine, plenty of other stuff for you to do out there (trades!)

    I like to think of it as a nice time of my life. But that's mostly because I went through a bunch of personal development.

    And what Blake said, you get what you put into it.

    skettios on
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Koshian wrote: »
    could always go for an apprenticeship or some sort of trade school. university isn't for everybody

    e: honestly this is a path that should be at the very least shown to students in high school. its unfair that in the US the dichotomy most know is 'flipping burgers or university'

    while I believe this is good advice, it's kind of hard thing to swallow from a person currently attending an institution of higher learning

    it's easy to say to someone "go to trade school" when you don't have to

    still if the stigma changed who knows

    I mean I agree that that stigma exists

    but what's funny is that a lot of universities are, functionally, trade schools

    going to school to learn how to perform a job, to have a strictly pre-professional education for the purpose of becoming better at some chosen vocation

    that isn't really different

    so I don't see why "trade schools" couldn't be folded into proper universities, because learning how to run a business, learning how to write fiction, and learning how to put a car together are really not that different

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Aren't trade schools cheaper too? I thought you get paid for being an apprentice or w/e.

    skettios on
  • Options
    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2011
    Blake T wrote: »
    Franko wrote: »
    try doing a group project when your group members don't know shit all

    there are a few more random variables in your sarcasm equation than you might think
    Franko, this is an important lesson for life.

    Shit doesn't get done unless you threaten people, fire the stupid ones and do all the important shit yourself and get the dumb one to do all the filing.

    ding ding ding

    Druhim on
    belruelotterav-1.jpg
  • Options
    DHS OdiumDHS Odium Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    College was pretty awesome for me. Here's why:

    It's the first real taste of freedom and independence most teens get. This doesn't work out for some people, clearly, but it was awesome for me. I did not drink, or party, or do a ton of social stuff. What I did get to do is watch a ton of movies, play a ton of games, spend a lot more time with my girlfriend, stay up as late as I want, and do my schoolwork as I see fit: which meant little studying, and skipping some classes because that day wasn't one of the important ones.

    I got either the President's Honor Roll or Dean's List every single semester, and graduated top 10% of my class (Cum Laude). Until my last year I didn't have to work at all, my parent's had a college fund set up to cover me, and I also got a scholarship which covered the bulk or classes, which meant every semester the remainder went to me, so I got paid to go to school. Besides a few classes and professors I wasn't a fan of, the bulk of them were awesome. I also managed to study abroad in Scotland (with trips to London) and it was awesome and still some of my fondest memories.

    DHS Odium on
    Wii U: DHS-Odium // Live: DHS Odium // PSN: DHSOdium // Steam: dhsykes // 3DS: 0318-6615-5294
  • Options
    rhylithrhylith Death Rabbits HoustonRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Hunter wrote: »
    Blake T wrote: »
    Man, college is like anything.

    You get exactly what you put into it.

    Americans like to bang on about their college experience do you know why? Because that's how they justify to their parents why they did a degree and still don't have a job.

    The reason why they don't have a job is because they did fuck all besides smoking weed and complaining about how life sucks because everyone doesn't follow your political ideas.

    You don't go to college for a fucking experience, you go there to work hard and with a goal to get a job.

    Suck it up finish your degree and go get a job.

    Possibly stop whining.

    That's what I did, it's what I usually say, and I catch crap from people about "it's not job training, it's an experience".

    I'm glad someone else has the same view as me about college, even if it's a person who is a descendant of criminals on some island in Mordor.

    Keep in mind we're also looking at it from the perspective of a science or engineering major. We're already harshly logical and driven for success/advancement. A lot of people are told that college is the thing you're supposed to do after high school so they do in fact go for the experience. This is unfortunate because it leads to an overabundance of people in certain majors and makes the job market very difficult for the ones who chose their field because they were actually interested in it and not because their credits lined up that way and they needed a degree.

    I mean don't get me wrong, college was really fun at times and I met my best friends there, but that's certainly not why anyone should be there. It's all about setting yourself up to do something you do well, enjoy, and will be well compensated for.

    rhylith on
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    my favorite part of college so far is meeting other talented students and established professors

    it just feels like I'll have a bunch of people to call if I need a favor or a reference, and that feels good

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    Kitten SwarmKitten Swarm Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I enjoyed college, but I had to learn to balance having to work my ass off in engineering classes and then when to relax and do something with friends.

    My memories are balanced between the most awesome/stressful academic moments and the random fun things with friends, which is pretty good in my book.

    It helped that the first class for freshmen in my major was a difficult one where they threw us in a room, shook us, and basically yelled "THIS IS YOUR SUPPORT GROUP, LEARN TOGETHER!" It's probably why most of us graduated on time.

    Kitten Swarm on
    You may learn that one day to your sorrow.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    Viscount IslandsViscount Islands [INSERT SoKo HERE] ...it was the summer of my lifeRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    my favorite part of college so far is meeting other talented students and established professors

    it just feels like I'll have a bunch of people to call if I need a favor or a reference, and that feels good

    So

    Networking?

    Viscount Islands on
    I want to do with you
    What spring does with the cherry trees.
  • Options
    KabitzyKabitzy find me in Monsbaiya Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    rhylith wrote: »
    Hunter wrote: »
    Blake T wrote: »
    Man, college is like anything.

    You get exactly what you put into it.

    Americans like to bang on about their college experience do you know why? Because that's how they justify to their parents why they did a degree and still don't have a job.

    The reason why they don't have a job is because they did fuck all besides smoking weed and complaining about how life sucks because everyone doesn't follow your political ideas.

    You don't go to college for a fucking experience, you go there to work hard and with a goal to get a job.

    Suck it up finish your degree and go get a job.

    Possibly stop whining.

    That's what I did, it's what I usually say, and I catch crap from people about "it's not job training, it's an experience".

    I'm glad someone else has the same view as me about college, even if it's a person who is a descendant of criminals on some island in Mordor.

    Keep in mind we're also looking at it from the perspective of a science or engineering major. We're already harshly logical and driven for success/advancement. A lot of people are told that college is the thing you're supposed to do after high school so they do in fact go for the experience. This is unfortunate because it leads to an overabundance of people in certain majors and makes the job market very difficult for the ones who chose their field because they were actually interested in it and not because their credits lined up that way and they needed a degree.

    I mean don't get me wrong, college was really fun at times and I met my best friends there, but that's certainly not why anyone should be there. It's all about setting yourself up to do something you do well, enjoy, and will be well compensated for.

    agreed wholeheartedly.

    Kabitzy on
    W7ARG.png Don't try and sell me any junk.
    Bother me on steam: kabbypan
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    my favorite part of college so far is meeting other talented students and established professors

    it just feels like I'll have a bunch of people to call if I need a favor or a reference, and that feels good

    So

    Networking?

    oui

    but also

    smoochin

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    HunterHunter Chemist with a heart of Au Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    The best part of your experience after college is realizing how much time and money you spent of classes that you actually use in your career vs not use in your career.

    Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed classes like literature, philosophy, history and music. They helped round out my knowledge base and give you a lot more to talk about at parties as a grown up. They especially helped my answering of Jeopardy questions. Just whatever you do, don't go and actually break down dollars per class hour or credit like I did. Don't then look at your student loan payments and break into tears.

    Hunter on
  • Options
    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I am forever grateful that I got through undergrad with no debt.

    Langly on
  • Options
    lostwordslostwords Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    i remember facebook starting up during my junior year of college, and how weirdly affecting it was for everyone, just one minute everyone had it and was going bananas poking and making friends. also, stalking was made like 10 times easier.

    lostwords on
    rat.jpg tumbler? steam/ps3 thingie: lostwords Amazon Wishlist!
  • Options
    HunterHunter Chemist with a heart of Au Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Langly wrote: »
    I am forever grateful that I got through undergrad with no debt.

    My debt wasn't horrible because I worked a lot, had scholarships, and some small help from my family. I ended with like 15k in debt total.

    My wife on the other hand had to loan out the whole damn thing minus her scholarship, and didn't work the same kind of hours. Then she did the full grad school road for a masters. I think her end total was in the 40 to 50k range. That bill hurts every month. In the butt.

    Hunter on
  • Options
    LanglyLangly Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I am totally getting debt for grad school though, so that is sad.

    Langly on
  • Options
    PixelMonkeyPixelMonkey Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    No op you're not alone uni for me has been a horrible experience as in developing.

    1: Developing depression/anxiety.

    2: Drink often alone to get just drunk.

    3: Doing nothing but study and only that nothing social.

    Some people just get to cruise/ get an easier through college/uni but that's life being a bitch. There not much you do except deal.

    PixelMonkey on
  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Hunter wrote: »
    The best part of your experience after college is realizing how much time and money you spent of classes that you actually use in your career vs not use in your career.

    Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed classes like literature, philosophy, history and music. They helped round out my knowledge base and give you a lot more to talk about at parties as a grown up. They especially helped my answering of Jeopardy questions. Just whatever you do, don't go and actually break down dollars per class hour or credit like I did. Don't then look at your student loan payments and break into tears.

    I wish colleges actually took this approach to teaching.

    For instance, it's not really necessary for me to know how to program HTML and other garbage, or archaic languages. It sure would be nice to get a rundown in OpenGL/DirectX and Socket programming though. Fuck it was hard to even get file IO. This is actually my gripes with a college before ITT.

    Thankfully a bunch of them are modernizing their software engineering courses.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I enjoyed college far more than high school, but not as much as sixth form (ages 16-18 in the UK).

    The best part of college was by far the opportunity to move out of my parents' house and go to a completely new city - something that would've been far more difficult and expensive if I'd dived straight into work. College itself sucked, but I did make a couple of really good friends, and I did get a degree that enabled me to find work, so it wasn't all bad.

    I'm going back to college now at 27, but it's a whole different ball-game. I already have a social circle and a job, for one, so I literally go to college just for the classes. I haven't even seen the campus by day and I've barely spoken to anyone in my classes except for when we're forced to work in a group.

    Janson on
  • Options
    HunterHunter Chemist with a heart of Au Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    If I had to choose between college and full time job, I'd choose college again. The stress level in college is more peaks and valleys, and I just had a lot more free time. It beats the constant stress I face now, and sometimes the abject fear. The fear sucks. Especially during the worst parts of the recession when your job was on the line every day for like 2+ years.

    Hunter on
  • Options
    babyeatingjesusbabyeatingjesus Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I wasn't in to college the first time I went. So much so that I dropped out pretty early. I'm back now at 30 and absolutely loving it. I have 8 hour days Monday Wednesday Friday and I look forward to them over my Tuesday Thursday Sundays at work immensely.

    A big part of it now is I'm mature now to take joy in the actual material and process of learning it. I'm happier here than I ever was in my previous career.

    babyeatingjesus on
    hitthatcheeseburgerfatty.gif
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    the one thing that is sorta getting to me about College: The Experience is I am not sure that my major warrants four whole years of study

    the first few years are good because they get you writing and thinking about writing and just basically light a fire under your ass

    but at a certain point you just need to do it and stop getting together with people who know as little as you do to talk about doing it

    there's also the whole short story vs. novel thing

    but this seemed a much bigger deal to me a month or two ago, and now I'm alright with it

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I love my job. Nothing in the world (well, except maybe a very large scholarship) could convince me to drop my job and go back to college full-time.

    I can agree with people on both sides of the argument in this thread.

    Yes, you should definitely actually try to study and learn in college.

    But, I also don't think it's wrong to like college for the experience. Because it is an experience. And it is a great stepping stone to the adult world.

    Basically, I would very, very, very strongly encourage my future children NOT to attend a local college. I see less motivation in people who stay at home and study and they also don't gain experience - both good and bad - with renting, sharing with strangers, exploring a new city entirely on their own, managing their own money... yes, they may screw up more often. But that's sort of the point.

    Janson on
  • Options
    rhylithrhylith Death Rabbits HoustonRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    No op you're not alone uni for me has been a horrible experience as in developing.

    1: Developing depression/anxiety.

    2: Drink often alone to get just drunk.

    3: Doing nothing but study and only that nothing social.

    Some people just get to cruise/ get an easier through college/uni but that's life being a bitch. There not much you do except deal.

    What are you majoring in, how many hours, and are you working a job simultaneously?

    rhylith on
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Janson wrote: »
    Basically, I would very, very, very strongly encourage my future children NOT to attend a local college. I see less motivation in people who stay at home and study and they also don't gain experience - both good and bad - with renting, sharing with strangers, exploring a new city entirely on their own, managing their own money... yes, they may screw up more often. But that's sort of the point.

    absolutely absolutely absolutely

    my friends who went to college in or around my hometown are the same people hanging out with the same people and following the same interests

    my friends who went other places are actually interesting

    one of the reasons I don't like going home is because of how little some of my friends have changed

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    In an ideal world, I also think people should be able to work for a few years first and then go to college, but sadly to get pretty much any job these days you need a degree...

    American college does have two advantages over UK college:

    1. Not being forced to choose a major before you even start. I thought I'd like architecture, started my degree and that was it - 39 solid hours of architecture every week, with absolutely NOTHING else taught. If it's not for you, you either have to drop out and start all over again or push forward and hope you have enough motivation to see you through the next three years. I chose the latter, and it was haaard.

    2. Being able to go to a community college - much cheaper and more flexible - for the first two years to gain credits to transfer. US college is crazy expensive!

    Janson on
  • Options
    vsovevsove ....also yes. Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    College was okay. I wish I'd waited a year before going, so that I could realize that 'maybe computing science isn't the best idea'. I'd love to go back to college, though, and if I had unlimited time and money I would go back and get a degree in History because I love to learn.

    Instead, I might go back and get my MBA. Practical learning, y'all.

    vsove on
    WATCH THIS SPACE.
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    architecture is actually much that way in the US, too

    you have to go straight into it and you have to make a whole lot of cuts

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    and my college is really, really expensive, but I just found out I'm a semester further than I thought I was, so that's nice

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    JansonJanson Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Janson wrote: »
    Basically, I would very, very, very strongly encourage my future children NOT to attend a local college. I see less motivation in people who stay at home and study and they also don't gain experience - both good and bad - with renting, sharing with strangers, exploring a new city entirely on their own, managing their own money... yes, they may screw up more often. But that's sort of the point.

    absolutely absolutely absolutely

    my friends who went to college in or around my hometown are the same people hanging out with the same people and following the same interests

    my friends who went other places are actually interesting

    one of the reasons I don't like going home is because of how little some of my friends have changed

    God, yes

    Going back to visit my parents was really rather saddening; so many of my friends had not moved on or changed in any way. I grew apart from many of them.

    I'm not saying I think I'm better than my old friends - just that there were so many things to which they could not relate at all. It was also frustrating when they had a lot more money since they weren't having to pay rent or buy food - and would assume you had the same (or bizarrely, even more...)

    Janson on
  • Options
    skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Janson wrote: »
    Basically, I would very, very, very strongly encourage my future children NOT to attend a local college. I see less motivation in people who stay at home and study and they also don't gain experience - both good and bad - with renting, sharing with strangers, exploring a new city entirely on their own, managing their own money... yes, they may screw up more often. But that's sort of the point.

    Yes! Getting out there and being independent was amazing,

    skettios on
  • Options
    Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I had already lived on my own on a few separate occasions when I went off to college

    which was real bad in some family-relationship ways, but it was great to get to college and have kids be like "Laundry?! Cooking?! No Moms?!?" and I got to just do my thing

    Charles Kinbote on
  • Options
    skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Going to college was my first time on my own, but I wasn't as bad as some of the other freshmen. For example, I knew how to do laundry... and I never once brought back laundry to do when I visited. Mom's coworkers were surprised at that.

    skettios on
  • Options
    babyeatingjesusbabyeatingjesus Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    My first independent experience was during my break of about 3 years between HS and College. I got an apartment at 19, and by 21 I was more than ready to move home and give school a shot. Problem was, I didn't know why I was going, just that I should, and was going to just get a BA. I couldn't find anything that interested me and ended up dropping out, then going to a local Community College and doing a degree in web design that ended in a career in print design.

    The "local" part was very important to me because I did NOT want to go through the living conditions I'd had in those three years of being broke and still having to work 40+ hours a week for school.

    Finding science was pretty much the best thing that ever happened to me.

    babyeatingjesus on
    hitthatcheeseburgerfatty.gif
  • Options
    PixelMonkeyPixelMonkey Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    rhylith wrote: »
    No op you're not alone uni for me has been a horrible experience as in developing.

    1: Developing depression/anxiety.

    2: Drink often alone to get just drunk.

    3: Doing nothing but study and only that nothing social.

    Some people just get to cruise/ get an easier through college/uni but that's life being a bitch. There not much you do except deal.

    What are you majoring in, how many hours, and are you working a job simultaneously?

    I'm studying a Bachelor of Creative Industries full time student and a 25 hours part time job.

    PixelMonkey on
  • Options
    Viscount IslandsViscount Islands [INSERT SoKo HERE] ...it was the summer of my lifeRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I had already lived on my own on a few separate occasions when I went off to college

    which was real bad in some family-relationship ways, but it was great to get to college and have kids be like "Laundry?! Cooking?! No Moms?!?" and I got to just do my thing

    I don't really get this. I live at home and I'm pretty [strike]spoiled[/strike] comfortable. My mom has a house keeper for her office who also does some chores in our house since they're one building.

    And I'm still capable of cooking and cleaning for myself.

    Viscount Islands on
    I want to do with you
    What spring does with the cherry trees.
  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    The only reason I recommend local and community colleges is because adding personal responsibility on top of a sometimes heaping workload that freshmen get can break a new student.

    This is what happened to me, I just couldn't deal with the workload I had and still maintaining SOME social life and also washing my clothes (olololol our washers didn't work, off to the other buildings with a tub of laundry!), eating (resident food was atrocious, and we weren't allowed to have hot plates or anything to cook with besides a microwave), and other things. At least a year of local college to help them get their priorities straight. Though, not all colleges dump that kind of work on you either.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    rhylithrhylith Death Rabbits HoustonRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Yeah I see where it would be difficult if you throw in the part time job. The only thing I can say is don't give up and try your best to make at least a couple hours to spend with friends per week. Having a little stress relieving time should help with the other problems. It is extremely important not to burn yourself out.

    rhylith on
  • Options
    babyeatingjesusbabyeatingjesus Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Oh man I am working very hard over the next 8-16 months to stabilize my finances so I can finish my degree without an income.

    3 jobs and full time study is bullshit

    babyeatingjesus on
    hitthatcheeseburgerfatty.gif
Sign In or Register to comment.