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girlfriend put my brand new kindle in a puddle

streeverstreever Registered User regular
edited March 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
No joke friends.

Should I buy the 2 year extended warranty which covers accidents?

It is well-reviewed on Amazon. 39.99, free shipping both ways, full replacement policy for any user error. (although apparently you really only get 1 year of accident replacement, but whatever! I only need it right now)

40 seems like a great price to get my kindle replaced new. She left it in a muddy puddle overnight :D The buttons are full of grit, and it does not work well, although after drying out for a few days it does... kind of work.

streever on

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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Are you asking us if it's OK to essentially commit warranty fraud? I don't know what kind of advice you're looking for...

    EggyToast on
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    SneakertSneakert Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Here's a better option: forget the kindle and spend the 40 dollars on a new girlfriend instead.

    Sneakert on
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Sneakert: The thought crossed my mind :) But she felt horrible about it, and I figure a gadget is a gadget.

    EggyToast: is it fraud? I didn't read in the conditions that there was a start date on the protection. I guess it makes sense to assume it is at moment of purchase, but the warranty was offered to me yesterday--several days after the incident and a week after purchase. I don't really know what the intentions are behind this particular warranty, but have had companies tell me to buy similar warranties before, after damage occurred.

    No, I'm not asking you an ethics question, I'm asking if anyone has any relevant experience in this.

    streever on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    If you turn it in almost immediately after you buy the warranty it'll send red flags because that's essentially fraud. You'll likely pay $40, then pay the $50 deductible, and then you've paid almost another $100, with the potential of being sued for fraud. How much did the kindle cost you? $140?

    Buy a new kindle, get the warranty/insurance plan, rest easy knowing you won't get sued.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    It's not just essentially fraud, it is fraud, because it violates the contract of the warranty.
    5. TERM OF COVERAGE. Coverage begins on the effective date listed on the certificate of coverage through the end of of the term of the contract.
    9. LIMITATIONS OF COVERAGE This Contract Does Not Cover:
    J. Pre-existing conditions (incurred prior to the effective date of coverage) known to You.

    How did you read the conditions without seeing those two very clear points?

    Kate of Lokys on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Potato, Potahto. The reason I used essentially because, yes, it is fraud, however it's basically a good faith agreement.

    It's not surprising that this happens frequently. That terms and conditions is basically saying "make sure you don't lie to us, we're trusting you!" And then completely offering warranty over email instead of at the time of sale.

    You could probably be on the hook criminally if you do it, even though this is soft fraud.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    bowen wrote: »
    Potato, Potahto. The reason I used essentially because, yes, it is fraud, however it's basically a good faith agreement.

    It's not surprising that this happens frequently. That terms and conditions is basically saying "make sure you don't lie to us, we're trusting you!" And then completely offering warranty over email instead of at the time of sale.

    You could probably be on the hook criminally if you do it, even though this is soft fraud.

    Ahh, thanks guys, and thanks for looking at the warranty Kate--I didn't read it particularly well, clearly :)

    also, looking at the total cost, it wouldn't be worth it anyway.

    streever on
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Honestly though, I went off of their product description:
    "The plan provides coverage against accidental damage under ordinary consumer use for two years from the date of original retail purchase"

    original retail purchase I thought meant the Kindle--because it is an extension of the kindle's warranty--so I am not convinced that the fine print overrides that, if that is what they are advertising, but again, I may be wrong. I am not a lawyer.

    streever on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Yeah you're absolutely right. If it was a $700 iPhone or iPad, yeah you should get the warranty, no doubts. $150 kindle you can replace in a month or two of savings? Naw, you paid more in the deductible + service.

    However, do you have renters/home insurance? Does it have a deductible?

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Foolishly, I do not have renters insurance :) I was meaning to get that this year.

    Bowen, where do you see the $50 deductible? I can't find that language anywhere. If it is only 39.00, I'll give the warranty company a call, ask them if they can clarify if the policy would apply to my situation, and then if so, buy it....

    streever on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    9 times out of 10 these warranty or insurance services have a nasty deductible. For instance I have a $10 a month insurance on my phone. My deductible was something like $75, now, my phone was pretty expensive but that deductible pretty much makes it worthless on less expensive things.

    There's a sweet spot for these things, if there's no deductible, awesome. $30 is still a bit much for a warranty they probably won't even honor anyways. Maybe if it was $15 and $15 deductible it'd be much more appealing. IMO, save your money, put $50 aside as your own insurance, and if you fuck up, you fuck up, at least you've got 1/3 of the cost set aside (assuming it stays the same price).

    Also, get on that insurance bro! You likely could've gotten it covered.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    FatsFats Corvallis, ORRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Have you tried just talking to Amazon? They're pretty lenient when it comes to replacing damaged Kindles, warranty or no.

    Fats on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Oh and plus it'll make your car insurance/whatever insurance cheaper too with multiple policies.

    For instance, I pay $80 a year for renters insurance (roughly). Before renters, my car insurance was $110 a month. After renters it went to $87. I get savings for having renters insurance because I save an extra $275 a year. Do it!

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Yea--I will! I am buying a really nice bike soon (I'm a road cyclist and upgrading to a race bike), and wanted to have renters insurance to cover theft/etc with the bike. (Obviously, it will be kept inside my apartment at all times). Previously, I haven't really owned anything valuable enough to pay for a policy!

    I actually don't drive, so that won't help me, but still useful.

    Fats, I'll try calling them first. Thanks a lot guys.

    streever on
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    BalgairBalgair Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Fats wrote: »
    Have you tried just talking to Amazon? They're pretty lenient when it comes to replacing damaged Kindles, warranty or no.

    Do that before anything else. A friend of mine just managed to get a free replacement for a similarly broken Kindle without having purchased the warranty. It would appear they can be somewhat lenient over at Amazon.

    Balgair on
    XBL:VOS THE VARG
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    MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Balgair wrote: »
    Fats wrote: »
    Have you tried just talking to Amazon? They're pretty lenient when it comes to replacing damaged Kindles, warranty or no.

    Do that before anything else. A friend of mine just managed to get a free replacement for a similarly broken Kindle without having purchased the warranty. It would appear they can be somewhat lenient over at Amazon.

    If that fails, perhaps the girlfriend can make it up to you by replacing the Kindle.

    MushroomStick on
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Mushroom: She offered to, but I'd rather see if I can avoid that. She feels so terrible about it already, I'd rather have a "wow! Amazon took care of it for free!" resolution.

    I did ask the Warranty people and they said no go, so next call is Amazon. Again, thanks for the advice, folks, I appreciate it.

    I was a little irritated by the borderline accusatory posts. I wasn't planning on defrauding anyone, but finding out what was or wasn't permitted and then moving forward. I mean, I understand the irritation versus people who do cheat the system, but cut me some slack :) I'm an honest guy.

    streever on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Nah honest mistake, a lot of people potentially ask that stuff when they get out an insurance policy.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    rizriz Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I.. what.. how did this even happen? I'm guessing she took it somewhere and it fell out of her bag/the car door and into said muddle puddle and she didn't notice because it was nighttime and raining? Even then, what.

    riz on
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    Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2011
    streever wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    Potato, Potahto. The reason I used essentially because, yes, it is fraud, however it's basically a good faith agreement.

    It's not surprising that this happens frequently. That terms and conditions is basically saying "make sure you don't lie to us, we're trusting you!" And then completely offering warranty over email instead of at the time of sale.

    You could probably be on the hook criminally if you do it, even though this is soft fraud.

    Ahh, thanks guys, and thanks for looking at the warranty Kate--I didn't read it particularly well, clearly :)

    also, looking at the total cost, it wouldn't be worth it anyway.

    Since you're not going the warranty route, try giving them a call anyway. Amazon has reportedly been super generous with replacement Kindles, even when people have accidentally broken them. Someone in the tech tavern thread said he broke his screen, and still got a free replacement from them.

    Bionic Monkey on
    sig_megas_armed.jpg
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    PirusuPirusu Pierce Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    streever wrote: »
    bowen wrote: »
    Potato, Potahto. The reason I used essentially because, yes, it is fraud, however it's basically a good faith agreement.

    It's not surprising that this happens frequently. That terms and conditions is basically saying "make sure you don't lie to us, we're trusting you!" And then completely offering warranty over email instead of at the time of sale.

    You could probably be on the hook criminally if you do it, even though this is soft fraud.

    Ahh, thanks guys, and thanks for looking at the warranty Kate--I didn't read it particularly well, clearly :)

    also, looking at the total cost, it wouldn't be worth it anyway.

    Since you're not going the warranty route, try giving them a call anyway. Amazon has reportedly been super generous with replacement Kindles, even when people have accidentally broken them. Someone in the tech tavern thread said he broke his screen, and still got a free replacement from them.

    Yeah. Amazon support is super awesome. My screen broke, called Amazon, told them I'd tried their trouble shooting tips to no avail. They overnighted me a new Kindle (!) and gave me a shipping label to send the broken one back (!!) at no charge to me whatsoever. If I fail to return the old one in 30 days, they'll charge my credit card, but 30 days is a long time.

    Pirusu on
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    LaliluleloLalilulelo Richmond, VARegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    You say she 'put' it in the puddle, like it was on purpose(?) Did she put it in the puddle, or did she drop it?

    Lalilulelo on
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    riz wrote: »
    I.. what.. how did this even happen? I'm guessing she took it somewhere and it fell out of her bag/the car door and into said muddle puddle and she didn't notice because it was nighttime and raining? Even then, what.

    Yea, basically. She is often a little careless with things, which is endearing at times. We just got back from a trip, and I had my kindle, laptop, and a book together. I carried the heavy stuff in the apartment, and she got the light stuff, and somehow dropped the kindle.

    It rained overnight, and there was already some wetness/mud where she dropped it, which is I guess why she didn't hear it drop. The kindle sat, against a curb, as mud ran all over it :D

    I asked her about my kindle the next day, because it wasn't with the other things, and thought it must be in the car. Nope. She got in the car and drove away, and then I saw it.... :)

    I didn't yell, but man, was I mad!

    streever on
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    LaliluleloLalilulelo Richmond, VARegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    So the real lesson/advice here is don't leave your expensive electronics with your clumsy girlfriend. O_o

    Guess you just need to save your coins for a new one, mate. Well, if Amazon doesn't bless you with forgiveness.

    Lalilulelo on
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    SneakertSneakert Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I hope you pressed her nose in the mud so she learns that it's not okay!

    ;)

    Sneakert on
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    streeverstreever Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Lalilulelo wrote: »
    So the real lesson/advice here is don't leave your expensive electronics with your clumsy girlfriend. O_o

    Guess you just need to save your coins for a new one, mate. Well, if Amazon doesn't bless you with forgiveness.

    It is true :) My clumsy yet sweet and lovable girlfriend, I keep reminding myself, as I hold back from taking Sneakert's suggestion :) She likes to remind me that I broke a wine glass of hers, but I like to remind her that the wine glass cost about 3 dollars :)

    streever on
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