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Stan Lee presents: [chat]

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Posts

  • radroadkillradroadkill MDRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    MyDcmbr wrote: »

    Side note: I bought the Better Pain Chart... chart, and a Sharkbear 7000% Deadly t-shirt VH.

    :D
    Hi5!

    I think my new favorite Hyperbole and a Half post is the fish story.

    I still "The Party."
    That's the one where they're wolves, right?

    That's a pretty good one, yeah.

    I like the mentally-challenged dog ones because they remind me so much of Benny.

    radroadkill on
  • DaxonDaxon Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Sooo..

    I think the pain I've been having from the inside of my mouth is some kind of dysplastic infected growth. It looks pretty bad.

    I think I might go to A&E just to get it checked out considering I'm going to Mallorca on Monday.

    Daxon on
  • WashWash Sweet Christmas Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I think my parents are cooler with the notion of bi/homosexuality now that it is becoming more socially acceptable.

    Neither my brothers nor I are gay or bisexual, but when I'd have hypothetical conversations with my parents about, they'd always cite social avenues as their reasons that it would be "upsetting".

    My mom used to say if I was gay it would make her sad, not because there was anything wrong with it, but because she'd want me to know the happiness of getting married or having a child. And that she'd hate to see me be persecuted. This was before gay people adopting and states legalizing gay marriage, so Im sure shed be p cool about now.

    My parents kind of own.

    2/3 of the people who raised me are fine with homosexuality in theory, those being my mom and grandma. I think any aspect of myself that deviates too far from what my mom expects me to become, however, is upsetting to her, and has in the past prompted her to outright reject the reality of it.

    Wash on
    gi5h0gjqwti1.jpg
  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    desc wrote: »
    Do bisexuals poop, or are they too indecisive?

    Like any individuals it depends on our fiber levels.

    Thomamelas on
  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2011
    Eddy wrote: »
    I have a friend who's convinced I'm attracted to him. He's a huge homophobe, but the ironic thing is I think, I think, he might have a crush on me that he refuses to acknowledge.

    Or possibly my powers as the Crush Whisperer only work when people are crushing on people who aren't me.

    Isn't this the setup for American Beauty?

    American Beauty:

    Plastic bag + pretentiousness.

    The end.

    *applause* *academy awards*

    Honk on
    PSN: Honkalot
  • Squirminator2kSquirminator2k they/them North Hollywood, CARegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Eddy wrote: »
    Isn't this the setup for American Beauty?
    Well I'm in LA now and he's still in England, so I somehow doubt the ending will be quite the same. He could send me abusive emails, though.

    Actually...

    Squirminator2k on
    The Game of Rassilon - a Doctor Who Roleplaying Game podcast
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  • WinkyWinky rRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    BobCesca wrote: »
    Drez wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Drez wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Drez wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    i don't really see that as the same thing. holding hands or basic affectionate gestures are appropriate to polite society, and i would include gay dudes holding hands in public as being under that umbrella.

    talking explicitly about sexual acts or encounters in mixed company is inappropriate and disrespectful whether you're straight or gay or a swinger or whatever else.

    Will, the problem is in the phrase "social niceties," which is ambiguous and doesn't have a universal definition. I mean, what is a social nicety to you is not necessarily a social nicety to someone else, and you might be personally accepting of some public behaviors that others might not - I guarantee you there are some people that find even holding hands in public to be beyond the pale.

    I mean, you can only really judge by your own compass, but those compasses are not necessarily synchronized among all of society.

    edit: In other words, you can't please everyone. Shouldn't really try to. Though I would agree there are some universal limits. You shouldn't bend your girlfriend over your Applebee's booth and start fucking her in front of everyone else, for instance. I think we can all agree on that. (Unless she's really hot.)

    it's true that people are going to have different standards and probably always have. i get the sense that the very concept of "politeness" is kind of under fire or being dismissed by groups who i kind of see as radical individualists, sometimes on this board. it strikes me that some of the these people are putting forward the position that free expression should be unfettered by social convention in as broad an arena as possible.

    probably one of the reasons that i kind of cling to and advocate for somewhat stricter and more universal social standards is that i see that kind of nihilism as socially destructive and ultimately destroys the ability to successfully communicate. social standards exist so that we can successfully live among other people.

    I started to type up a big post here because I think there's a lot to say about social norms but I don't think I really want to go into it all here. I think, by and large, social norms are either arbitrary or semi-arbitrary. For instance, "don't wear hats indoors" is totally arbitrary, at least in modern application. "No elbows on the dinner table" is semi-arbitrary because one could make a case that technically elbows could damage a dinner table, but it's pretty unlikely to happen unless your forget to take your bladed gauntlets off before sitting down to eat (hell, maybe that's where the rule came from).

    When you start talking about sex, well, think about a world where everyone spoke about sex publicly. Would that world be fundamentally worse than this one? It would be different, and I don't claim to be able to predict either the ramifications of that society, or what that aspect of society might communicate about a society that acts that way. But I can't dismiss it as being fundamentally worse. So, in a way, an aversion to public displays of affection, or sex as a common topic, or bowel movements, is somewhat arbitrary. You can't really be faulted, though, for harboring these aversions because they developed as a part of your upbringing and adult life within these arbitrary social norms. So even though they are primarily arbitrary, they are also inherently personal.

    So my opinion toward politeness and social norms is that we should try to respect each other as much as possible, especially in public, but we should also not put too many limiters on each other if we can help it. A balance between freedom and politeness - not too far in either direction. And where that line is, is totally fluid and contextual. As someone else said, two people talking about sex in private is totally different from a bunch of bros sitting around the bar in Chilis shouting out sex and poop stories.

    well, i agree that most social rules are fundamentally arbitrary and that other sets of equally arbitrary rules could be generally substituted with no ill effects.

    but i also think that arbitrary rules are necessary to a cleanly-functioning society. by way of analogy, i'd cite traffic rules. there's no reason why people couldn't drive on the left side of the road, and in societies where they do it works just fine. but unless everyone is following the same set of arbitrary rules, it's difficult to really get anywhere.
    Fair enough, but I'd say that's only semi-arbitrary. A set of rules for traffic were needed. The decision between left and right was arbitrary, and remains so, but for safety and practicality, adherence to those rules is required for society to function.

    The same cannot be said for wearing hats indoors or, really, talking about sex in public. I don't mean to discount that people have a right to some comfort, but I don't feel that everyone has a right to total comfort in public. I'm just curious if that's how you feel...like, do you feel entitled to zero uncomfortability while in public? I'm not getting at you - I'm just curious. When I go out in public, I expect I won't be comfortable with everything I see and encounter, especially in New York City. I mean...there's just no way that'll ever happen. The question is how much we need to adapt to fit into each others' comfort zones.

    I know that a rule like "do not wear a hat indoors if you are male" is arbitrary, but for some reason it really annoys me when guys do this. And when it comes to talking about sex in public, I think a lot of it comes to down to the fact that I really don't care about random person A's sex life, and if I can hear them talking about it then I really don't think that is appropriate.

    I don't expect to feel comfortable in every situation, but I really don't think it's wrong for me to expect people to behave in a certain fashion when in public (and I really don't think my expectations are particularly strict or conservative).

    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    Winky on
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Drez wrote: »
    Drez wrote: »
    MyDcmbr wrote: »
    That didn't take nearly long enough but I think I'm a little over 100
    Scott Pilgrim vs. The World
    The Persuit of Happyness
    Taken
    Flight of the Navigator
    Star Wars IV-VI
    Bevery Hills Cop 1 and 2
    Cowboy Bebop the Movie
    Princess Mononoke
    Spirited Away
    Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust
    Second Hand Lions
    South Park: Bigger Longer and Uncut
    Team America
    Planes, Trains and Automobiles
    The Great Outdoors
    My Blue Heaven
    Wayne's World 1 and 2
    Alien, Aliens and Alien 3 ...acutally I'm gonna put in Alien Resurrection too because watching it after seeing all the behinds the scenes stuff in the Quadrilogy it's a much more interesting film. :P

    Pirates of the Carribean trilogy (no two and three weren't great overall but it's more Jack Sparrow so I can't help but enjoy them)

    How to Train Your Dragon
    Ghost in the Shell
    Wall-E
    Legend of the Guardians (which was surprisingly enjoyable)
    The Goonies
    Monty Python: Meaning of Life, Life of Brian and The Holy Grail
    Lethal Weapon I-IV
    Braveheart (remember when Gibson was a closet anti-semite? Ah those were the days)
    Batman Begins and the Dark Knight
    Transformers
    Indiana Jones I-III
    Back to the Future series
    Avatar
    District 9
    A Fistful of Dollars
    Last Man Standing
    The Long Kiss Goodnight
    Pulp Fiction
    Kill Bill vol. 1 and 2
    Resivour Dogs
    The Men Who Stare at Goats
    Austin Powers
    Jackie Brown
    Meet Joe Black
    Inglorious Bastards
    Terminator 2
    The Whole Nine Yards
    American Gangster
    American History X
    Ong Bak
    Fight Club
    Blow
    From Dusk 'till Dawn
    Goodfellas
    Casino
    Ocean's 11
    Burn After Reading
    Ghostbusters
    Scrooged
    A Muppet Christmas Carol
    Die Hard and Die Hard with a Vengeance
    American Psycho
    Toy Story
    What Dreams May Come
    Heat
    Serenity
    The Matrix
    X-Men 1 and 2
    Spiderman
    The Watchmen
    Iron Man 1 and 2
    The Incredible Hulk
    Happy Gilmore Mr Deeds and of course Billy Madison
    Ong Bak
    Spaceballs
    Robin Hood: Men in Tights
    Blazing Saddles
    History of the World: Part I
    Patch Adams
    Man on Fire
    The Wrestler


    I could keep going but I'd have probably have to start looking up titles before much longer to make sure I'm getting them right :P

    Yep, you listed at least 4 movies that I should have put on my list but could not remember.

    That's...that's a list of bands.

    Movies, Drez :P

    Did you guys pull a trick on me? I thought he was quoting Tav, who listed bands. Or am I going mental?

    I posted my list few posts under Tav I think :lol:

    MyDcmbr and I were trying to come up with 100(ish) movies that we could name off the top of our heads that we actually enjoyed.

    HappylilElf on
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited March 2011
    BobCesca wrote: »
    I know that a rule like "do not wear a hat indoors if you are male" is arbitrary, but for some reason it really annoys me when guys do this. And when it comes to talking about sex in public, I think a lot of it comes to down to the fact that I really don't care about random person A's sex life, and if I can hear them talking about it then I really don't think that is appropriate.

    I don't expect to feel comfortable in every situation, but I really don't think it's wrong for me to expect people to behave in a certain fashion when in public (and I really don't think my expectations are particularly strict or conservative).

    bumps, cesca

    Irond Will on
    Wqdwp8l.png
  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Winky wrote: »
    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    So if someone told you that it bothered them when you wore your hat indoors, would you humor them or stand on principle?

    Powerpuppies on
    sig.gif
  • CindersCinders Whose sails were black when it was windy Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    The worst assumption that a parent... shit, that anyone can make make after one comes out is that you immediately want to put your penis in/wrap your vagina around every single person who happens to be the same gender as you.

    Which is, of course, absolute bollocks.

    If your vagina is stretchy or loose enough to actually wrap around a person, you have far bigger issues than your parents suspecting you're gay.

    It hungers!

    Cinders on
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Plus: I get to eat fried walleye when I get home!

    Negative: It's walleye so I can't just devour it and have to actually pay watch out for bones.

    HappylilElf on
  • Dread Pirate ArbuthnotDread Pirate Arbuthnot OMG WRIGGLY T O X O P L A S M O S I SRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    blaaaaaaaaaargh crappy mood.

    Dread Pirate Arbuthnot on
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Drez wrote: »
    Irond Will wrote: »
    well, i agree that most social rules are fundamentally arbitrary and that other sets of equally arbitrary rules could be generally substituted with no ill effects.

    but i also think that arbitrary rules are necessary to a cleanly-functioning society. by way of analogy, i'd cite traffic rules. there's no reason why people couldn't drive on the left side of the road, and in societies where they do it works just fine. but unless everyone is following the same set of arbitrary rules, it's difficult to really get anywhere.

    Fair enough, but I'd say that's only semi-arbitrary. A set of rules for traffic were needed. The decision between left and right was arbitrary, and remains so, but for safety and practicality, adherence to those rules is required for society to function.

    The same cannot be said for wearing hats indoors or, really, talking about sex in public. I don't mean to discount that people have a right to some comfort, but I don't feel that everyone has a right to total comfort in public. I'm just curious if that's how you feel...like, do you feel entitled to zero uncomfortability while in public? I'm not getting at you - I'm just curious. When I go out in public, I expect I won't be comfortable with everything I see and encounter, especially in New York City. I mean...there's just no way that'll ever happen. The question is how much we need to adapt to fit into each others' comfort zones.

    i don't really see it as "keeping people from being uncomfortable" necessarily, but just as a set of coda that let you know how to confidently proceed in social interactions. i do scowl a little when i see people wearing their hats in a restaurant, but it doesn't really make me uncomfortable so much as i see it as a little disrespectful to the establishment and think it kind of speaks ill of the individual in question.

    for the record, i found new yorkers to be surprisingly polite! except for the bus drivers. they were rude as shit.

    Don't even get me started on bus drivers.

    I've been:

    a) Physically threatened by a bus driver to the point where other passengers had to get in between us. He was most likely trying to goad me into attacking him, because that's a felony, and he gets like unlimited time off for being attacked by a passenger. All this because he was the last express bus out of the city and was going on 25-30 minutes late, so I called the depot to find out if it was still coming and probably got in trouble for sitting around instead of driving his bus. He knew I was the one that called because I told them what stop I was on, and he starts talking about my mother and whatnot.

    b) Almost run over by a bus driver (I think it was an accident).

    c) Threatened by a bus driver that he would call the police on me if I did not get off his bus, because I brought Chicken McNuggets on the bus. This is AFTER I already paid $5.50 for the ride AND was prominently displaying the McDonald's bag while entering the bus and paying. He actually stopped the bus and got out. And started calling dispatch and then threatened to call the police. I refused and told him to go ahead and call the police so he could explain to them that he stopped the bus and called the police because someone brought chicken nuggets on the bus and he didn't like the smell. Of course he didn't call the police and eventually starting driving the bus again.

    I have dozens of other stories. Bunch of tools.

    Drez on
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    Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
    Playing: Persona 5 Royal (PS4), Animal Crossing (SW), FF7remake (PS4)
  • stevemarks44stevemarks44 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Honk wrote: »
    Eddy wrote: »
    I have a friend who's convinced I'm attracted to him. He's a huge homophobe, but the ironic thing is I think, I think, he might have a crush on me that he refuses to acknowledge.

    Or possibly my powers as the Crush Whisperer only work when people are crushing on people who aren't me.

    Isn't this the setup for American Beauty?

    American Beauty:

    Plastic bag + pretentiousness.

    The end.

    *applause* *academy awards*

    Yo dog Kevin Spacey's performance in American Beauty was bonkers.

    stevemarks44 on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I don't wear hats but if I did I wouldn't feel any real need to take it off in a restaurant... social norms are different in different places. So if someone came from a more permissive place than I did and did annoying shit, I would forgive them once I learned they came from a place where that was okay, but I would expect them to act as expected as long as they were in my neck of the woods. So if I went to Boston and was wearing a hat I would try to remember to remove it while in a restaurant.
    To me half the attraction of wearing hats and various other "old-fashioned" articles comes from those mannerisms and rules. Like wearing a jacket, I got a lot of enjoyment out of watching Boston Legal: Alan always closes 1 button on his jacket whenever he's standing up and will put it open again when he's sitting down. This is something I kept track of, he never ever forgets this. I really wonder if this was part of the character he plays or if he's like that in Real Life as well.

    I am pretty disappointed when I see a dude wearing a hat and not taking it off when inside. There was a bloke at a birthday and he kept his hat on the whole time. I just couldn't take him seriously. Clearly he thought hats were the bees knees, but why would he wear a hat indoors?

    Aldo on
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited March 2011
    Winky wrote: »
    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    possibly, but in the meantime there are going to be some people who are just going to think that you're kind of an ignorant ass before you even meet them.

    and i mean i guess you could say "i wouldn't want those kinds of people who care about social rules to like me anyways" but i don't think that really expresses an understanding of how many or what kinds of people care about social rules to at least some extent.

    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    Irond Will on
    Wqdwp8l.png
  • WinkyWinky rRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Winky wrote: »
    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    So if someone told you that it bothered them when you wore your hat indoors, would you humor them or stand on principle?

    I would humor them.

    I mean, if anyone actually told me that something I did was bothering them I would probably appease them unless it was an unreasonable demand.

    Winky on
  • Squirminator2kSquirminator2k they/them North Hollywood, CARegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    To change the subject away from bisexual pooping, I'd like to say that the Doctor Who series 5 soundtrack sound is wonderful. Love it. "I Am The Doctor" is such a perfect piece of music, but the entire score is just... beautiful. Stunning. Murray Gold's finest work on the show yet.

    Squirminator2k on
    The Game of Rassilon - a Doctor Who Roleplaying Game podcast
    PortsCenterJump LeadsThe Life Toyetic with Ben and Molly
  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2011
    Honk wrote: »
    Eddy wrote: »
    I have a friend who's convinced I'm attracted to him. He's a huge homophobe, but the ironic thing is I think, I think, he might have a crush on me that he refuses to acknowledge.

    Or possibly my powers as the Crush Whisperer only work when people are crushing on people who aren't me.

    Isn't this the setup for American Beauty?

    American Beauty:

    Plastic bag + pretentiousness.

    The end.

    *applause* *academy awards*

    Yo dog Kevin Spacey's performance in American Beauty was bonkers.

    Yo I'mma let you finish, but Chris Cooper was one of the best closeted homophobes of all time.

    Honk on
    PSN: Honkalot
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Man my only experience with a bus driver was the lady who was driving the bus we took to get back to where we parked after the Vikings played the Seahawks in preseason this past year.

    She was a little crazy but in the overly nice way and was super helpful in giving us directions and whatnot.

    HappylilElf on
  • stevemarks44stevemarks44 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Honk wrote: »
    Honk wrote: »
    Eddy wrote: »
    I have a friend who's convinced I'm attracted to him. He's a huge homophobe, but the ironic thing is I think, I think, he might have a crush on me that he refuses to acknowledge.

    Or possibly my powers as the Crush Whisperer only work when people are crushing on people who aren't me.

    Isn't this the setup for American Beauty?

    American Beauty:

    Plastic bag + pretentiousness.

    The end.

    *applause* *academy awards*

    Yo dog Kevin Spacey's performance in American Beauty was bonkers.

    Yo I'mma let you finish, but Chris Cooper was one of the best closeted homophobes of all time.

    :lol:

    stevemarks44 on
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Aldo wrote: »
    why would he wear a hat indoors?

    Possibly having hair issues.

    On days when mine is being sufficiently fine that it won't stay tied back the easiest thing to do is stuff it in a beanie.

    japan on
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Almost everything about the MTA in New York is totally fucking terrible.

    Drez on
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    Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
    Playing: Persona 5 Royal (PS4), Animal Crossing (SW), FF7remake (PS4)
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Will: If I wear a Yankees cap indoors at a sports bar in Boston, will I get stabbed?

    Drez on
    Switch: SW-7690-2320-9238
    Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
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  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »

    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    I have been sick for a couple weeks and refusing handshakes. It is so lame and embarrassing every time.

    Powerpuppies on
    sig.gif
  • CindersCinders Whose sails were black when it was windy Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I stare down other peoples handshake. Cause they're jerks.

    Cinders on
  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2011
    Every time I see someone go for a handshake, I go for the nuts.

    Honk on
    PSN: Honkalot
  • Squirminator2kSquirminator2k they/them North Hollywood, CARegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    And now I need to watch Ten's regeneration into Eleven again. I just do. SHUT UP.

    Squirminator2k on
    The Game of Rassilon - a Doctor Who Roleplaying Game podcast
    PortsCenterJump LeadsThe Life Toyetic with Ben and Molly
  • stevemarks44stevemarks44 Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Winky wrote: »
    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    possibly, but in the meantime there are going to be some people who are just going to think that you're kind of an ignorant ass before you even meet them.

    and i mean i guess you could say "i wouldn't want those kinds of people who care about social rules to like me anyways" but i don't think that really expresses an understanding of how many or what kinds of people care about social rules to at least some extent.

    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    I am so in the habit of handshakes that a lot of times even if my good friends come over I will shake their hands. Sometimes at work my boss will be like "hey man, how's it hanging?" and our arms will extend and I will go in handshake-grip ready and he will go for a fistbump and it is sooooo awkward.

    stevemarks44 on
  • WinkyWinky rRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »
    Winky wrote: »
    I mean, I don't really care about random person A's new job or their cousin's baby either.

    It really boils down to what you're comfortable about yourself.

    Also I don't mind remaining blithely ignorant to social rules like removing your hat and I kind of suspect that rules like that will probably just die out over time.

    possibly, but in the meantime there are going to be some people who are just going to think that you're kind of an ignorant ass before you even meet them.

    and i mean i guess you could say "i wouldn't want those kinds of people who care about social rules to like me anyways" but i don't think that really expresses an understanding of how many or what kinds of people care about social rules to at least some extent.

    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    I find that there are just a number of details of politeness that are so variable I have no idea what's expected of me in a lot of situations, and I really don't care enough about stepping on people's toes about minor things to go out of my way to preempt something like that.

    Perhaps offering a handshake to someone is the polite thing to do, but to a particular individual it makes them extremely uncomfortable, or in a particular culture or subculture it is seen as impolite. Maybe in the situations you commonly find yourself there's an easy to follow code but I don't tend to find that.

    Winky on
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »
    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    Ahahahaha

    This remindes me of the time I was introduced to a friend's boyfriend who was up from Minneapolis.

    He extended his hand upon being introduced and I just stared at him for a moment, then looked at his hand and then looked back at his face with a disdainful "Really?" expression.

    Then I grinned and shook his hand.

    The amount of tension that built in the roughly five seconds it took to do that was amazing.

    Everyone, including the guy in question, was pretty much in tears from laughter.

    HappylilElf on
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    For the record, I don't go around talking about sex and whatnot either.

















    Nothing to talk about :(

    Drez on
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  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Oh by the way, kids, take note here. I told my co-workers I determined my level of teasing on how much sex I thought they were having. If I thought someone was getting laid erryday I would tease them more and I'd be nice to people whose love life is best described by America's Horse With No Name.

    It works out perfectly: the people I tease are happy because they know I think they have loads of sex and the people I don't tease are glad I'm nice to them.

    Aldo on
  • DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Aldo wrote: »
    Oh by the way, kids, take note here. I told my co-workers I determined my level of teasing on how much sex I thought they were having. If I thought someone was getting laid erryday I would tease them more and I'd be nice to people whose love life is best described by America's Horse With No Name.

    It works out perfectly: the people I tease are happy because they know I think they have loads of sex and the people I don't tease are glad I'm nice to them.

    Wow, here in America you'd get hanged by a firing squad for that kind of thing.

    Drez on
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  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    the only area of social norms in which i have encountered variable is in chivalry (men waiting on women). Every other area has pretty standard rules where the more polite option is abundantly clear, and the only possible discussion would be how big a deal it is if someone does the less polite thing out of laziness or carelessness.

    Powerpuppies on
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  • WinkyWinky rRegistered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Aldo wrote: »
    Oh by the way, kids, take note here. I told my co-workers I determined my level of teasing on how much sex I thought they were having. If I thought someone was getting laid erryday I would tease them more and I'd be nice to people whose love life is best described by America's Horse With No Name.

    It works out perfectly: the people I tease are happy because they know I think they have loads of sex and the people I don't tease are glad I'm nice to them.

    Maybe it works the other way around, and the people that you tease get laid more because of it.

    Winky on
  • BobCescaBobCesca Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »

    some social rules are incredibly important. for instance, refusing a handshake is the height of rudeness. it can start fights! do you really not want to not be aware of this?

    I have been sick for a couple weeks and refusing handshakes. It is so lame and embarrassing every time.

    Most awkward situation ever was when a couple of my Mum's colleagues from India came to the UK when I was 14 or so. I knew that one of them would shake hands but the other wouldn't (hands are for eating or pooping so there's no shaking of hands for cleanliness reasons), but her descriptions of which one would and which one wouldn't was really bad and I ended up in that uncomfortable half-way to handshake when realising the other person isn't reciprocating thing.

    Luckily the other guy was much more outgoing and kinda stepped forward, shook my hand, and let me get over my embarrassment.

    BobCesca on
  • OrganichuOrganichu jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    i think that i'm sometimes too polite

    in these cases i look to will for guidance

    Organichu on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Winky wrote: »
    Maybe it works the other way around, and the people that you tease get laid more because of it.
    I don't think I have magical gifts. And if I had I would be teasing myself so hard right now.

    Aldo on
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