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[It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia] Worm Talk and Worm-Related Issues

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Posts

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    ObiFett wrote: »
    Someone talk to me about the season finale that just aired.

    My mind is literally blown right now.

    I watched it. It was a beautiful, impressive performance.

    Was it the right way to end a reason? I'm not sure about that (not that the franchise hasn't had missteps before). Mac-focused episodes tend to be...not quite as strong as Charlie/Frank or Dee/Dennis focused ones, since he does stand alone increasingly. It wasn't the masterpiece that was "The Gang Broke Dee", but it's absolutely a memorable episode. It wasn't a laugh-out-loud episode, but a being-wowed episode.

    I also strongly suspect it's not indicative of any change more radical than how the season began, which...I'm fine with. I like the show. I liked the changes in this season. I don't need it to change into something completely different, and I don't expect it to. But it is a "moment" for Mac, the same way the end of the least season was a genuine "moment" for Dennis, albeit in a very different context.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
    ArbitraryDescriptor
  • ViskodViskod Registered User regular
    I missed it, spoil me. what happened.

    Artereis wrote: »
    It's not your fault, Viskod. 1 out of every 10 people just happens to be a monster.
  • ObiFettObiFett Use the Force As You WishRegistered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    ObiFett wrote: »
    Someone talk to me about the season finale that just aired.

    My mind is literally blown right now.

    I watched it. It was a beautiful, impressive performance.

    Was it the right way to end a reason? I'm not sure about that (not that the franchise hasn't had missteps before). Mac-focused episodes tend to be...not quite as strong as Charlie/Frank or Dee/Dennis focused ones, since he does stand alone increasingly. It wasn't the masterpiece that was "The Gang Broke Dee", but it's absolutely a memorable episode. It wasn't a laugh-out-loud episode, but a being-wowed episode.

    I also strongly suspect it's not indicative of any change more radical than how the season began, which...I'm fine with. I like the show. I liked the changes in this season. I don't need it to change into something completely different, and I don't expect it to. But it is a "moment" for Mac, the same way the end of the least season was a genuine "moment" for Dennis, albeit in a very different context.

    I don't want to talk about it outside of spoilers because not knowing anything about it makes it that much more poignant, imo.
    I kept waiting for them to undercut it, but they never did. And I think thats the genius of the episode. They've never done anything like this so my mind just kept waiting for something to happen but it never did, which kept me really engaged with the scene. Which was amplified even more by there being no music or sound other than the sounds of the dancers and water. I was enthralled for so many reasons and that made it stick the landing so much harder.

    I don't think its indicative of a greater change in the show. I think they saw an opportunity to say something, so they did.

    I think it was a great way to end the season. That final scene is what will stick with me until next season and that makes it even more powerful, imo.

    OneAngryPossumDemonStacey
  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    Gonna spoiler talk about last night episode
    The ending went over my head. I appreciated for what the technical proficiency of it, but that was it. Then I was looking at Rob's twitter feed today and it was just an outpouring of the lgbt community saying how hard they were hit by it.

    So it clearly hit the mark it was aiming for.

    Rhesus Positive
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    I'm surprised they didn't undercut it too--though they've done that before (they even did it this season, when Dee "won the game"--they didn't undercut her victory, though everyone watching must have expected them too). As with Dee, not undercutting makes it particularly poignant in a way, so I'm fine with that. Of course, this episode was a much sharper departure.

    The first two thirds...pretty conventional, though really not on the top of their game. It works as as setup, but even without the stunning performance, you wouldn't remember much of the rest of the episode. Mac's confessions are kind of less powerful version of Dennis' "God hole" sentiment, complete with a better response from Frank, I think. The episode is really about the last 6 minutes or so. Which is fine, but the episode is also judged in its entirety. It'll definitely be remembered as a defining moment in the series no matter what comes next (which, true to form, will probably be that dynamic we know and love), right up there with when Dee "broke", Dennis calling it quits, and of course, Charlie's musical.

    Of course, this episode did it without laughs, but masterful performance. Which is unique in its own right.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    I could have sworn last season was the last; this one felt like an encore season, and the finale seemed like the second encore where they came back on stage after most of the audience had left and perform something off-brand and personal.

    I dug it.
    Viskod wrote: »
    I missed it, spoil me. what happened.

    The title is "Mac finds his Pride"

    It's not hilarious or outrageous or anything. It was just a nice bit of art about Mac.

  • ViskodViskod Registered User regular
    Okay but what is this thing that happened at the end of the episode that everyone is talking around?

    Artereis wrote: »
    It's not your fault, Viskod. 1 out of every 10 people just happens to be a monster.
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Viskod wrote: »
    Okay but what is this thing that happened at the end of the episode that everyone is talking around?
    Mac, having recounted to Frank about a reoccurring dream he has regarding his sexuality and his religiosity--he's visited by god, who's "a hot chick", and they dance--gets the gang to help him set up a stage to perform in front of a prison audience including his father Luther (who's back in jail, and he'd previously accidentally given the idea he'd "knocked someone up", which Luther actually responded positively too, so long as it was a boy. Mac seemed to reproduce his dream against a soaked, black drop with a very talented ballerina (I think?), revealing his has some amazing dance training that no one ever knew about. Luther leaves halfway through it, but the rest of the audience, Frank included, just watches in amazement. It ends as cryptically as it began, in silence, and Frank declares, "I get it. I get it!" and he and the rest of the audience break out into applause, then the credits roll.

    Very much a "Cut to black" ending for them.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • ObiFettObiFett Use the Force As You WishRegistered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Viskod wrote: »
    I missed it, spoil me. what happened.
    (FWIW, I would recommend no one read this. Watch the episode. My stupid writeup here doesn't do it justice, imo)
    The first 2/3 of the episode is typical (funny) IASIP where the gang is being horrible. Frank is trying to get Mac to be the gay dancer on their Pride float. Mac isn't feeling it. He says he doesn't know where he fits in and doesn't feel proud. Frank, who broke his nose early on, spends the entire episode shoving, increasingly hilarious, things up his nose to stop the bleeding while taking Mac around to various cliche gay scenes to try and help Mac feel proud. Frank says he never "got" Mac, but he's trying to help. Finally he realizes that Mac needs to come out to his dad. Mac meets up with his dad and tries to explain how he's feeling (there's a storm inside of him and there's a super hot woman who's also god and they dance and they create something beautiful) except of course it comes out as a metaphor that sounds more like he is having a baby. His dad is ecstatic that he will finally have someone to carry on his name and mac goes along with it because his dad is acknowledging him for the first time. We later see Frank give up on convincing Mac to be the dancer on the pride float and convince cricket to do it. Again, all the while Frank's face is just getting more puffy and swollen as he jams stuff up his nose to stop the bleeding. Finally, as he trying to drive the float, he realizes it isn't working and he can't keep going on like this.

    We see him re-enter Mac's apartment with blood all over his shirt and his face no longer swollen. He explains to Mac that he realizes what Mac needs to do. Mac needs to be able to let out his feelings, much like Frank needed to let the blood out of his nose.

    Cut to the prison and Frank has set up a stage and convinced the prisoners (including Mac's dad) to watch Mac perform what he's feeling inside. He tells his Dad he's gay, it quickly cuts to black. For the rest of the episode, Mac and a female dancer perform this amazingly beautiful and poignant dance while water falls around them. There's no sound or music. Just the water and the sounds of them dancing and its incredible. No jokes. Nothing undercuts it. Its a gorgeous dance that portrays Mac's inner turmoil. At the end, Mac crumbles into the arms of his partner and cries, while she strokes his hair and says "Its ok, It's ok" over and over.

    During all of this there are cuts back to Frank and the convicts watching in awe. Frank begins to cry towards the end. And when its over, declares through his tears and the beginning of scatted applause "Oh my God. I get it. I get it."

    Then it ends.

    The episode earned that ending, too. While its a tonal shift for the series in general, throughout the episode it was like Mac was acting in a drama while everyone else was typical IASIP. Looking back, I remember thinking that Mac was acting weird, but was just expecting some payoff. I did not expect the payoff that the show delivered.

    ObiFett on
    OneAngryPossumArbitraryDescriptorLegacy
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Viskod wrote: »
    Okay but what is this thing that happened at the end of the episode that everyone is talking around?
    Mac comes out to his dad.
    From the start, Frank doesn't GET why Mac is gay, and takes him to various cliche gay bars to help him figure out what kind of gay he is. Throughout the episode Mac tries to describe this dumb dream to various people that explains how he feels and how he realized he was gay.

    It culminates in Mac and Frank tricking the prison into getting the cell block together for a Blake Shelton performance, then Mac comes on stage to tell his dad that he can't explain it and it would just be easier to show him. Then he puts on a ballet performance that is a genuinely beautiful rendition of the dream he had been failing to describe.

    Macs dad walks out half way through, but the other prisoner's, Frank in particular, are enraptured, and it closes on Frank being moved to tears as he finally "gets" Mac.

    The end.

  • ViskodViskod Registered User regular
    I see.

    I would have preferred Mack just be able to be happy with himself and feel pride, but whatever. If they wanted to be artsy and ambiguous for the sake of being artsy and ambiguous at least it sounds like they pulled it off.

    Artereis wrote: »
    It's not your fault, Viskod. 1 out of every 10 people just happens to be a monster.
    ArbitraryDescriptorSynthesis
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Viskod wrote: »
    I see.

    I would have preferred Mack just be able to be happy with himself and feel pride, but whatever. If they wanted to be artsy and ambiguous for the sake of being artsy and ambiguous at least it sounds like they pulled it off.

    I got the sense that it made him happy; his malaise was about not being able to express himself, and he ultimately did that.
    I left out what I just now am realizing was a
    very relevant juxtaposition: The b-plot (and initial premise) was that the rest of gang had nominated Frank to convince him to dance on Paddy's float in the Pride parade to attract wealthy LGBT customers.

    Mac didn't want to, participation in some cynically exploitive sideshow wasn't going to be a genuine expression of his pride, or what being openly gay meant to him as a devout catholic. The theme of the dream/ballet was wrestling with his denial all his life and god ultimately telling him it was ok to be who he was.

    Edit: Spoiler tag'd

    ArbitraryDescriptor on
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  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Viskod wrote: »
    Okay but what is this thing that happened at the end of the episode that everyone is talking around?
    Mac, having recounted to Frank about a reoccurring dream he has regarding his sexuality and his religiosity--he's visited by god, who's "a hot chick", and they dance--gets the gang to help him set up a stage to perform in front of a prison audience including his father Luther (who's back in jail, and he'd previously accidentally given the idea he'd "knocked someone up", which Luther actually responded positively too, so long as it was a boy. Mac seemed to reproduce his dream against a soaked, black drop with a very talented ballerina (I think?), revealing his has some amazing dance training that no one ever knew about. Luther leaves halfway through it, but the rest of the audience, Frank included, just watches in amazement. It ends as cryptically as it began, in silence, and Frank declares, "I get it. I get it!" and he and the rest of the audience break out into applause, then the credits roll.

    Very much a "Cut to black" ending for them.

    TIL: Mac's dad has a name!

  • The Dude With HerpesThe Dude With Herpes Registered User regular
    I haven't watched this season yet, but I did watch the end of the last episode after hearing so much about it.

    Because it's related, I'll link this:

    The way Always Sunny did it was beautiful, rich, and displayed a lot of depth, while also communicating a pretty simple message; one that just so happens is one of the hardest for individuals to see, feel, and understand:
    All Mac has ever wanted was to be loved. By his father, by his friends, by women, and then men when he felt like the hole in himself wasn't being filled by women; and ultimately by a god that has never shown him love, in a religion that has never taught him that he deserves to be loved, contradicted by the idea that same god is supposed to be all loving. He's spent his life seeking connections, but not ones that will fulfill the lack of a fathers love, both profane and spiritually. His friends revel in each others horribleness, but rarely if ever actually connect or listen to the others, or notice their needs. Not that Mac is any better, but he, more than anyone them, is constantly reaching out for more, but never getting it. From anyone important to him.

    The dance was a beautiful interpretation of the struggle internally, of doing the "dance" of life, relationships, but always ending distant and incomplete. I saw some commentary that the women was supposed to represent god; but I think that's not true. I don't think Always Sunny would make that positive of a depiction of a religious figure. No, she was Mac, always trying to love himself but never able to really connect with himself. She was his true nature always there doing the dance with his outward physical self; who would just keep doing the dance himself, but rarely seeming satisfied or happy, looking away from her every time she tried to pull him in.

    His father walking out was the snap that made him see her there and really engage and allow himself to see the beauty of what he really was inside and allowing himself to finally tell himself that it's ok. He's ok. The light at the end wasn't "god", it was the love that he had always sought from an uncaring, nonexistent deity, and finally finding it within, by trusting himself and who he really is.

    It's funny because on one hand it seems like a scene wholly out of place in Always Sunny, but the fact that we've had mostly unchanging characters for 13 seasons, it's allowed for a fairly deep examination into them and why they are who they are, for better or worse. What makes it work is because we actually know Mac, his hangups, fears, etc, quite well. Behind everything he does, there's always been an earnest desire on the characters part for the world to be a beautiful place. Sure, maybe not how you and I would view "beautiful" but he would describe things about his beliefs, what he thought people (his mom) thought about him, or what he wanted people (his father, god) to believe about him, and it was always wanting to have things be an idealistic way, that just happened to be really far from reality.

    So,
    a long and beautifully choreographed interpretive dance to display his inner turmoil actually felt...totally natural.
    I always knew the Sunny guys were geniuses; they have to be to even make this show. But this episode, on top of fat mac and how that actually turned out to be a brilliant creative decision, and now super saiyan chiseled Mac being an actually important aspect of the character over the shows run, hammers home to me how much of geniuses they are.

    If they said this had been planned for years, or from the get go, I could totally buy it. But because of the nature of the show I could also totally buy it was totally unplanned for up until it was written, and it works either way.

    I suspect the show will stay the show in season 14, and some people may find that disappointing; but I like it. Moments of epiphany can change a person, but it is rare that they actually produce radical immediate change. It's not uncommon to have a profound shift in the way you view something, but for it to take time (if at all) to actually effect your behavior or life. Going back to the status quo would be perfectly acceptable, and I hope people don't assume IASIP is suddenly going to become a serious drama going forward.

    Also Frank was very important
    because while he represented the crass consumption and appropriation of what Mac was struggling with, it was also a reminder of Mac himself, while allowing Mac to be conflicted. Because lets be "frank" (olol); what Frank was suggesting to Mac, in any other situation he would have been 100% on board for. It was simply because the suggestion of the specific thing was also what was killing Mac on the inside that we needed another character to remind us who the Gang really is, while still allowing for the show to say something beautiful about Mac, and in turn, about loving yourself.

    If I had a criticism, and maybe it'd change once I see the rest of this season, but the show has never particularly set Frank up as a father figure for Mac. They pair up occasionally, but he's much more the father figure for Charlie, and just naturally Dee/Dennis. So that part felt a little iffy, but I will choose to look at it less as he's a father surrogate, but more of a narrator, and his "I get it" at the end was more telling the audience that Mac gets it, because he managed to communicate it to Frank, who hadn't been able to understand it before. Frank couldn't "get it" unless Mac finally got it.

    It was just utterly fantastic. I would watch that scene wholly out of context of anything simply for its artistry. It works on its own, completely separate from the show, but works also within the framework of the show, even if on paper it sounds bizarre and out of place.

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  • OneAngryPossumOneAngryPossum Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    It was tonally out of whack with the rest of the entire series, but that was one of the boldest moves I’ve ever seen such a well-established show make. Legion, American Gods, The Leftovers, there’s a lot of amazing surreal emotional TV going on these days, but that’s what those shows are. Deviating this hard is an insane choice. I have no idea if it makes sense for the show, but goddamn I love that they went for it.

    My wife and I were specifically talking about how the show has evolved Mac’s sexuality since the beginning just before last night’s episode. He was clearly written as a straight man from the outset, then had his relationship with Carmen (a trans woman, and boy the show didn’t handle that well at the outset), slowly became more of an overcompensating macho type caricature with an unhealthy Dennis obsession, and then he finally came out, and it was oddly sweet. Then it just got left there for the longest time, and it didn’t really sit right. I liked Mac as a happy gay man, but it felt almost inappropriate for the show to just let it rest given the torturous path it took to get there.

    With that in mind, that final scene felt as much like an exploration of Mac as an exploration of what the show is actually saying with the character. I’m not the guy to judge how well they succeeded, but the sincerity and earnestness and dedication on display felt like the crew reckoning with that past.

    Which is, again, a weird fucking thing for Sunny to do. But that willingness to just go for it is behind a lot of the show’s best moments. And McElhenney is capable of much, much more than I ever guessed.

    OneAngryPossum on
  • ObiFettObiFett Use the Force As You WishRegistered User regular
    The dancing partner was most definitely supposed to be god. If anything because Mac explained earlier as her being god.

    ArbitraryDescriptorLegacyMild ConfusionRickRudeQuid
  • DehumanizedDehumanized Registered User regular
    Haven't seen the finale yet but I'm very excited for it. This season has been a little mixed in quality but Time's Up For The Gang and The Gang Solves The Bathroom Problem were both absolutely top-tier Sunny.

    ArbitraryDescriptorDark Raven X
  • ViskodViskod Registered User regular
    Which episode was it where Mack and Charlie just out and out beat the shit out of kids in the middle of the street, because that was the most Sunny that Sunny has ever been in a long time.

    Artereis wrote: »
    It's not your fault, Viskod. 1 out of every 10 people just happens to be a monster.
    DemonStacey
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Haven't seen the finale yet but I'm very excited for it. This season has been a little mixed in quality but Time's Up For The Gang and The Gang Solves The Bathroom Problem were both absolutely top-tier Sunny.

    I loved the actual footage of the Rob at the Superbowl snuck in at the end of the last one. It segued well with the finale if we pretend it was actually Mac, and his religious experience of the Eagles winning caused his dream that very evening.

    Variable
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Viskod wrote: »
    Which episode was it where Mack and Charlie just out and out beat the shit out of kids in the middle of the street, because that was the most Sunny that Sunny has ever been in a long time.
    The Gang Gets New Wheels

    Had to Google it, this season has been a blur of awesome for me.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Viskod wrote: »
    Okay but what is this thing that happened at the end of the episode that everyone is talking around?
    Mac, having recounted to Frank about a reoccurring dream he has regarding his sexuality and his religiosity--he's visited by god, who's "a hot chick", and they dance--gets the gang to help him set up a stage to perform in front of a prison audience including his father Luther (who's back in jail, and he'd previously accidentally given the idea he'd "knocked someone up", which Luther actually responded positively too, so long as it was a boy. Mac seemed to reproduce his dream against a soaked, black drop with a very talented ballerina (I think?), revealing his has some amazing dance training that no one ever knew about. Luther leaves halfway through it, but the rest of the audience, Frank included, just watches in amazement. It ends as cryptically as it began, in silence, and Frank declares, "I get it. I get it!" and he and the rest of the audience break out into applause, then the credits roll.

    Very much a "Cut to black" ending for them.

    TIL: Mac's dad has a name!

    It's actually given either in the first or second episode he appears in? I don't remember, but it's not a new creation of this season.

    I'm pretty sure it's Luther, and not Luthor. Though it's an odd name for what I assume is a rather conservative, conservatively-brought-up Catholic man (then again, he's also a notorious criminal).

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • The Dude With HerpesThe Dude With Herpes Registered User regular
    ObiFett wrote: »
    The dancing partner was most definitely supposed to be god. If anything because Mac explained earlier as her being god.

    I guess what that could mean would depend on ones beliefs.

    I'd say:
    What is god but a manifestation of the hole people want to fill from what they are lacking in their lives?

    It's just an idea that can shift to fit whatever we feel like we need reassurance for. The same god can be all loving and all hating, forgiving and condemning, spiteful and accepting.

    God never was anything but a mirror that shows us what the wants and needs that aren't being met in our lives.

    Mac sees a beautiful woman who never stops trying to love him and reach him. No matter how many times he looks away or is halfheartedly participating in the dance, she never gives up. It's only when the approval he thought he needed from his father is taken away for a final time, that he can accept that he deserves it, and finally looks within.

    To many, Mac probably included, they see that inner love from a god that they want to be real. Personally I find that sad, because it isn't, never was, and it's obscuring their love for themselves, leaving a barrier always between themselves and acceptance and approval of their own lives. But we're still functionally children, no matter how long we live. We always desire that approval from a parent, even if we convince ourselves we don't; it's one of the reasons why so many can cling to religion in the face of what those religions actually represent and what they actually provide. And frequently in the face of who they are and what they know to be true about themselves, even if it is a contradiction from what they're supposed to be in the eyes of the creator they've imagined.

    I'm probably just projecting here, to be honest. I've been through crisis of self and crisis of faith, individually and together. I can see how a Mac would go through and still see a god in the end, but I can also see how one could have the same experience and come out with the realization that it was never a gods approval they were seeking, but their own.

    Not that any of this is going to play into the show going forward! :lol:

    And that's great, honestly. The purpose of interpretive dance is literally to show inner feelings through your body and allow others to interpret what it means; the act is usually more self reflective than it is observational, even if we believe otherwise. Kinda like god. :P

    Give the guys their damn Emmy, let us contemplate, and return to the relative absurdity that is the norm of the show. :)

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  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    holly shit... wtf... Mac's real name is Ronald McDonald?!

    ArbitraryDescriptorMild Confusion
  • The Dude With HerpesThe Dude With Herpes Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    Here's a bit of interviews and discussion with Rob and others involved with making that final scene; what went into creating it and what they wanted to communicate with it.

    Definitely worth the read.

    EDIT: I also have to say they kinda cheated using Sigur Ros for the music. You could put their music on a Benny Hill clip and turn what was some sexist slapstick into a deep contemplation on the futility of humanities search for love and connection. :lol:

    The Dude With Herpes on
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  • RocketScienceRocketScience Registered User regular
    What's the name of the choral music right at the end, after Sigur Ros?

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    DanHibiki wrote: »
    holly shit... wtf... Mac's real name is Ronald McDonald?!

    It's like you guys aren't even watching the show!

    (Just joking--they have mocked him for a few times since the original reveal, which was at the High School Reunion Pt. 1, back around season...7? 8?)

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
    AuralynxDemonStaceyVariableFencingsaxMild ConfusionRhesus Positive
  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    "Ha! I named him that!"

    OneAngryPossumSynthesisRickRude
  • StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    That was a masterclass in creative control.

    I don't remember the last time an episode of TV threw me sideways so unexpectedly.

    Goddamn well done.

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  • DemonStaceyDemonStacey TTODewback's Daughter In love with the TaySwayRegistered User regular
    Episode ending.
    I think an important line that showed a surprisingly touching moment from Frank was when Mac says "so I should do the float" and Frank tells him no, he needs to do HIS thing. Not what the other people want him to do. It was simple but very meaningful.

    That's sort of in response to this:
    Viskod wrote: »
    I see.

    I would have preferred Mack just be able to be happy with himself and feel pride, but whatever. If they wanted to be artsy and ambiguous for the sake of being artsy and ambiguous at least it sounds like they pulled it off.

    desc wrote: »
    ~ * ~ Week-Long Dance-a-thon Booty Ribbon ~ * ~
  • DanHibikiDanHibiki Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    DanHibiki wrote: »
    holly shit... wtf... Mac's real name is Ronald McDonald?!

    It's like you guys aren't even watching the show!

    (Just joking--they have mocked him for a few times since the original reveal, which was at the High School Reunion Pt. 1, back around season...7? 8?)

    That was a decade ago...
    I'M OLD, LEAVE ME ALONE!

  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    All I want to do is talk about this but nobody I know in real life watches this show any more.

    This was a payoff years in the making.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
    jkylefultonDemonStaceyQuid
  • RickRudeRickRude Registered User regular
    From a dildo bike and Dennis sex doll to this. That is quite the journey.

    syndalisjkylefultonRhesus Positive
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    RickRude wrote: »
    From a dildo bike and Dennis sex doll to this. That is quite the journey.

    Like, it was a joke for seasons... and it turns out to have been significantly more in a way that wasn’t really expected.

    This show will never win an award and I don’t know if I want it to.

    But it deserves recognition for this.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
    DemonStacey
  • VariableVariable Mouth Congress Stroke Me Lady FameRegistered User regular
    I did see a few comedy types praising it online at least, that was nice. people I consider genius or to have done genius work (specifically I saw nick kroll and tim heidecker. I won't argue about tim and eric because people seem to like it or hate it but Kroll Show did amazing things with their concept)

    BNet-Vari#1998 | Switch-SW 6960 6688 8388 | Steam | Twitch
  • TaximesTaximes Registered User regular
    edited November 2018
    I thought the finale was both well executed and funny in an anti-joke kind of way, given the show's history of the surreal & subversion of expectations.

    "Wouldn't it be funny if Mac got super fat for no specific reason?"
    "Wouldn't it be funny if Mac got ridiculously buff and no one cared?"
    "Wouldn't it be funny if this season ended with a really intense and deeply emotional moment with no jokes?"

    Taximes on
    DemonStacey
  • AlphaRomeroAlphaRomero Registered User regular
    Just saw it, holy shit that was captivating.

    OneAngryPossumQuid
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    It was meant to be a total shock, and it succeeded in that regard.

    My favorite episode(s) this season were the Superbowl two-parter, which I think were masterfully done and more entertaining (as well as having a great conclusion), but as a surprise, no contest.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • SpaffySpaffy Fuck the Zero Registered User regular
    Here's a bit of interviews and discussion with Rob and others involved with making that final scene; what went into creating it and what they wanted to communicate with it.

    Definitely worth the read.

    EDIT: I also have to say they kinda cheated using Sigur Ros for the music. You could put their music on a Benny Hill clip and turn what was some sexist slapstick into a deep contemplation on the futility of humanities search for love and connection. :lol:

    As someone who appeared in several Benny Hill episodes as a child... can confirm

    ALRIGHT FINE I GOT AN AVATAR
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