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Old Man River Raid [Geezer Gamers] (updated OP)

13

Posts

  • TurkeyTurkey So, Usoop. TampaRegistered User regular
    My first PC came with The 7th Guest, some game I don't remember, and motherfucking Critical Path. It wouldn't be until recently that I finally got to play the entirety of Critical Path, thanks to an interactive Youtube rendition of it:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUamoP_H7eo

  • harvestharvest By birthright, a stupendous badass.Registered User regular
    I started gaming on a Colecovision in 1984. We lived in West Germany (Fulda, I'm an Army brat) and didn't have anything else to do with the TV because we didn't speak German. On that system I remember playing Venture:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0CUeI9KKpY
    I was pretty good at this game for being only 3-4 years old. I didn't really have the manual dexterity to get that far at that point though (level 3 if I remember correctly), but I could do better than my parents. There was also Space Panic, Looper and Looper 2, and more that I can't remember. We had this until we left Germany but it was broken in shipping, water damage or something. I lost a lot of stuffed animals to mold in shipping too :(.

    But that was all fine, because when we moved back to the United States I learned that my grandparents had an Intellivision. This was kind of a step sideways from the Colecovision but it also had some really great games. Burgertime, Utopia, something about fleet combat, lots of stuff. Unfortunately almost every game required the little plastic guide to go over the number pad (remember those?) to actually know how to play the game, and they were easily lost or destroyed. Oh and Lock 'n Chase and Ladybug, those were on there too.

    We later got a C64 with one floppy drive and no tape drive. My dad pirated just about all the software we had for that thing, and of course none of it had any documentation. I had learned to read by this point and that lead to learning how to use the command line. I didn't really play games on this thing very much, but the ones I did were pretty epic, like Pirates! We had some ocean game on a cartridge that I couldn't figure out the point of (you turned into a bird at one point, but I don't recall your standard form), Balloon Crazy, some overhead view racing game, lots of text adventures that I could never beat but reinforced the reading skills I had learned (I was about 6 then). My dad would buy gaming magazines that had pages and pages of code you could enter to get the games featured in the magazine working on your own system. I remember him spending a lot of time debugging Dig Dug because it kept crashing or locking up or whatever things did when they misbehaved on that system.

    We always used those one-button Atari-style joysticks and I wore them out pretty fast. From what I remember computer and gaming peripherals never lasted very long back then, but it might have been that I didn't treat them very well.

    In 1989 I got a NES and the rest is history. We got a SNES late in its life and then we got the computer that changed my life, a Packard Bell P90 with 8 megs of RAM and Windows 95. Thing even had a 14.4 modem. I learned how to use DOS in getting games like Privateer and Populous 2 to run (with sound and mouse/joystick at the same time!) and I truly became a PC gamer because of that system. I spent a lot of money upgrading and maintaining it, until I built my own in 1999.

    All of this gaming and being interested in computers taught me to read at a level consistently much higher than what was expected of me in school, taught me real skills in using computers for both games and productivity software, and has ultimately been responsibility for me getting the jobs I have had as an adult. A lifetime of gaming has been a life well spent.

    B6yM5w2.gif
  • harvestharvest By birthright, a stupendous badass.Registered User regular
    I started gaming on a Colecovision in 1984. We lived in West Germany (Fulda, I'm an Army brat) and didn't have anything else to do with the TV because we didn't speak German. On that system I remember playing Venture:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0CUeI9KKpY
    I was pretty good at this game for being only 3-4 years old. I didn't really have the manual dexterity to get that far at that point though (level 3 if I remember correctly), but I could do better than my parents. There was also Space Panic, Looper and Looper 2, and more that I can't remember. We had this until we left Germany but it was broken in shipping, water damage or something. I lost a lot of stuffed animals to mold in shipping too :(.

    But that was all fine, because when we moved back to the United States I learned that my grandparents had an Intellivision. This was kind of a step sideways from the Colecovision but it also had some really great games. Burgertime, Utopia, something about fleet combat, lots of stuff. Unfortunately almost every game required the little plastic guide to go over the number pad (remember those?) to actually know how to play the game, and they were easily lost or destroyed. Oh and Lock 'n Chase and Ladybug, those were on there too.

    We later got a C64 with one floppy drive and no tape drive. My dad pirated just about all the software we had for that thing, and of course none of it had any documentation. I had learned to read by this point and that lead to learning how to use the command line. I didn't really play games on this thing very much, but the ones I did were pretty epic, like Pirates! We had some ocean game on a cartridge that I couldn't figure out the point of (you turned into a bird at one point, but I don't recall your standard form), Balloon Crazy, some overhead view racing game, lots of text adventures that I could never beat but reinforced the reading skills I had learned (I was about 6 then). My dad would buy gaming magazines that had pages and pages of code you could enter to get the games featured in the magazine working on your own system. I remember him spending a lot of time debugging Dig Dug because it kept crashing or locking up or whatever things did when they misbehaved on that system.

    We always used those one-button Atari-style joysticks and I wore them out pretty fast. From what I remember computer and gaming peripherals never lasted very long back then, but it might have been that I didn't treat them very well.

    In 1989 I got a NES and the rest is history. We got a SNES late in its life and then we got the computer that changed my life, a Packard Bell P90 with 8 megs of RAM and Windows 95. Thing even had a 14.4 modem. I learned how to use DOS in getting games like Privateer and Populous 2 to run (with sound and mouse/joystick at the same time!) and I truly became a PC gamer because of that system. I spent a lot of money upgrading and maintaining it, until I built my own in 1999.

    All of this gaming and being interested in computers taught me to read at a level consistently much higher than what was expected of me in school, taught me real skills in using computers for both games and productivity software, and has ultimately been responsibility for me getting the jobs I have had as an adult. A lifetime of gaming has been a life well spent.

    B6yM5w2.gif
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Synthesis wrote:
    I guess if TIE Fighter counts as geezer gaming, here's something I inevitably return to:

    feb01_mw2_1.jpg

    Copy of this, and Duke Nukem 3D{/i] came free with a Thrustmaster joystick my dad bought--well before 2000, so I guess it counts. What a phenomenally awesome game, probably one of my top in terms of "time spent" ever.

    I remember playing this game around the same time the Mechwarrior cartoon was on TV, and wishing that the game looked like that.

    Get to post some of my favorites! :P

    ss3.jpgss2.jpg
    435071-wc4_22_super.jpg

    Wing Commander. The entire series, but especially 3 and 4 because omg actors! I even got my dad to play these.

    Speaking of parents, I used to play the King's Quest and Space Quest games with my mother. Whenever a new one came out, she kept me out of school that day so we could go down to EB to pick it up and play together. Those were good times.

    Shadowfire on
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks Registered User regular
    I had Mechwarrior on the Sega Saturn. I need to play the PC version sometime.

    Speaking of old systems, I remember when a console's power was determined not by how fast it's CPU was or how much RAM it had, but by how well it played Doom.

  • EvilMonkeyEvilMonkey Registered User regular
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpAJuFVCBYY

    (Thanks to eobet for remembering the name for me)

    [PSN: SciencePiggy] [Steam]
  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    police_quest1-3.gif
    Never did beat this. Or the 2nd one. But damn if I didn't spend hours and hours trying.

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • TOGSolidTOGSolid Drunk sailor Seattle, WashingtonRegistered User regular
    edited September 2011
    PC-Joystick-271x300.jpg
    And yeah, this was my first PC joystick. SO many hours spent playing X-Wing and Tie Fighter with that thing. I miss it :(

    TOGSolid on
    wWuzwvJ.png
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    Echo wrote:
    I had a state of the art portable gaming rig.
    sx64.jpg

    My friend's older brother had one of those. It sat next to shoeboxes full of copied disks made with Fast Hack'Em. I still loved my full sized C64 more though.

  • rikdalyrikdaly Registered User regular
    Reznik wrote:
    police_quest1-3.gif
    Never did beat this. Or the 2nd one. But damn if I didn't spend hours and hours trying.

    don't forget to check those tyres.

    I never beat it either

    steam_sig.png
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Ah yes, the genre of games that kill you without mercy at the end of the game because you forgot to do a vital thing in the first five minutes. <3

  • RoeRoe Always to the East Registered User regular
    I used to play Wheel of Fortune, Jepordy, Carmen Sandiego, Frogger, and a couple other games on my Dos Tandy computer.

    It was awesome.

    oHw5R0V.jpg
  • SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    There was a place at a local mall here in the mid-80s called the Microplex that seemed to be all about educating kids in science. They had a bunch of fun activities you could do, including sitting on a bar stool while spinning a bike tire and turning it horizontally and vertically to spin the stool.

    But this isn't about that; they also had a bunch of these:

    413px-PCjr_expanded_cropped.jpg

    The IBM PC Jr. Apparently it was a commercial failure! But this place had 10 of them, and my elementary school had a lab full of them. These are the machines on which I first played some of those Sierra classics, like King's Quest and Space Quest. I think there was even a Disney game made by Sierra at that place.

    I was obsessed with Sierra's stuff when I was a kid, but my problem was that I had no system to play them on. I had to rely on friends to let me play on their computers, and usually they didn't want to do that at all. When I got my Mac Plus, I was happy to discover that I could get Space Quest. It was the only Sierra adventure game I bought. I played the hell out of it, beating it several times.

  • DangerbirdDangerbird Registered User regular
    Turkey wrote:
    My first PC came with The 7th Guest, some game I don't remember, and motherfucking Critical Path. It wouldn't be until recently that I finally got to play the entirety of Critical Path, thanks to an interactive Youtube rendition of it:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUamoP_H7eo

    Man, playing this game sure is a hoot. I love how of the two choices it presents you with, one is the obvious "let her die" option.

    In hindsight, its pretty funny how at the time, people thought FMV was the way of the future, when in actuality it was incredibly limiting.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    SteevL wrote:
    The IBM PC Jr. Apparently it was a commercial failure! But this place had 10 of them, and my elementary school had a lab full of them. These are the machines on which I first played some of those Sierra classics, like King's Quest and Space Quest. I think there was even a Disney game made by Sierra at that place.

    I was obsessed with Sierra's stuff when I was a kid, but my problem was that I had no system to play them on. I had to rely on friends to let me play on their computers, and usually they didn't want to do that at all. When I got my Mac Plus, I was happy to discover that I could get Space Quest. It was the only Sierra adventure game I bought. I played the hell out of it, beating it several times.

    I've never seen a PCjr with a top expansion before. I used to own one, and my father brought home a sidecar that expanded the memory to 640kB. Of course I was insanely jealous of his PC1 with 1MB of ram. :P

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    My uncle and I spent literally 2 years working on finishing Police Quest on his computer. Good times.

    Ah, it stinks, it sucks, it's anthropologically unjust
  • bloodatonementbloodatonement Registered User regular
    In thinking back to my first gaming memory, I realized I subconsciously named the thread after the first game I remember playing. My dad picked up an Atari 2600 and River Raid was either bundled with it, or one of the games he bought. My brother and I fired it up and, in the ridiculous things you believe as child, thought we were the greatest in the world because we scored higher than the screenshot on the game box.

    I now own an Atari Flashback 2 and I think my son is getting close to the age where I can start him on that.

    Zdy0pmg.jpg
    Steam ID: Good Life
  • Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    Was thinking back to the Atari days and remembered my friend and I playing the OLD blocky football game for hours, with our dad's watching us. We used to get so worked up and excited playing that game with our parents cheering us on. If only our younger selves had any idea of what Madden franchise would be, I think we'd have fainted.

    50433.png?1708759015
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Oh God, flashback to the bullshit that was expanded memory/conventional memory.

    I have met one or two people who look back on the days of boot-up floppies and IRQ settings with nostalgia. Those people are stupid. One of the greatest advances of modern PC gaming is the relative ease by which one can buy a game and have it working. Sure there are issues here and there, but nothing like from the days of yore.

    While we have a GOG thread, perhaps we should put a link in the OP, as that fits the nature of this thread well.

    My first console was an Atari 2600 (actually, it was the Sears clone) that I played at my Grandparent's house when I was four. Microsoft's Game Room, while a terribly designed system that charged too much for classic games, did hit the nostalgia factor out of the park when I booted up Yar's Revenge and was immediately transported back to when I was sitting on the carpet on my Grandpa's lap while playing the game. He used to cheer me on. God I miss my Grandpa.

    Anyways, I never had the opportunity to play with the C64, as my first actual computer was a Pentium 75MHZ that I used for all manner of old DOS games.

    DoctorArch on
    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote:
    Oh God, flashback to the bullshit that was expanded memory/conventional memory.

    I have met one or two people who look back on the days of boot-up floppies and IRQ settings with nostalgia. Those people are stupid. One of the greatest advances of modern PC gaming is the relative ease by which one can buy a game and have it working. Sure there are issues here and there, but nothing like from the days of yore

    I guess I'm one of those stupid people that look back upon it with Nostalgia. I even look back at autoexec.bat, config.sys, manually setting network card drivers, and other various things with a sense of nostalgia. I guess I'm just stupid :(

    50433.png?1708759015
  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Round Rock, TXRegistered User regular
    Banzai5150 wrote:
    DoctorArch wrote:
    Oh God, flashback to the bullshit that was expanded memory/conventional memory.

    I have met one or two people who look back on the days of boot-up floppies and IRQ settings with nostalgia. Those people are stupid. One of the greatest advances of modern PC gaming is the relative ease by which one can buy a game and have it working. Sure there are issues here and there, but nothing like from the days of yore

    I guess I'm one of those stupid people that look back upon it with Nostalgia. I even look back at autoexec.bat, config.sys, manually setting network card drivers, and other various things with a sense of nostalgia. I guess I'm just stupid :(

    Yeah, stupid like a fox

    Me too

  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    Sorry Banzai, stupid is probably too harsh of a word.

    It's like someone telling you "Oh yeah, remember the good old days when you had to worry more about women dying in childbirth or cholera?"

    I never enjoyed dealing with things like IRQ, autoexec.bat, config.sys, etc. I only had to deal with them because they were the only option.

    So let me apologize and restate. Simply feeling nostalgia for those days is one thing, people saying those days were better, now I'll call that silly.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • LawndartLawndart Registered User regular
    Spoilering the secret "uh, oops...wait, how did this princess wind up getting kidnapped?" ending to an Apple IIe game that is older than the average PA forumite:

    Bonus points if your first thought after watching that video was "Man, that fucking bird."

  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    Lawndart wrote:
    Spoilering the secret "uh, oops...wait, how did this princess wind up getting kidnapped?" ending to an Apple IIe game that is older than the average PA forumite:

    Bonus points if your first thought after watching that video was "Man, that fucking bird."

    I knew the minute I saw the video what was going to happen.

    And really, in regard to Autoexec.bat and what not, remember the feeling of triumph when you finally opened up enough memory and Ultima 7 started up for you? Kids nowadays have it too easy.

  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Double Post. : P

    Esh on
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    If I recall correctly on of the first Atari 2600 games that actually had an ending was Raiders of the Lost Ark, which I am sad to say, I never could beat.

    Have I mentioned that I am grateful for people like those who developed DosBox or Exult, without which those old games of yore could probably never be enjoyed today.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • SteevLSteevL What can I do for you? Registered User regular
    Lawndart wrote:
    Spoilering the secret "uh, oops...wait, how did this princess wind up getting kidnapped?" ending to an Apple IIe game that is older than the average PA forumite:

    Bonus points if your first thought after watching that video was "Man, that fucking bird."

    I had Karateka for the Atari 7800 and could never beat it.

    Yes, because of that fucking bird. And probably also because of that shitty 7800 controller.

    7800controller.jpg

  • bloodatonementbloodatonement Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Remember this guy?
    28me0ya.jpg

    Great marketing, it's not a button that slows down your computer to play older games, it's a button the turbo charges your computer to play new games.
    DoctorArch wrote:
    While we have a GOG thread, perhaps we should put a link in the OP, as that fits the nature of this thread well.
    Just a link to gog.com?

    bloodatonement on
    Zdy0pmg.jpg
    Steam ID: Good Life
  • Mr_GrinchMr_Grinch Registered User regular
    Turbo buttons were fucking awesome. I wish I could get a pc case with one on now.

    Steam: Sir_Grinch
    PSN: SirGrinchX
    Oculus Rift: Sir_Grinch
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote:
    While we have a GOG thread, perhaps we should put a link in the OP, as that fits the nature of this thread well.
    Just a link to gog.com?
    Probably a link to both GOG.com and the GOG thread here on the forums. I know it's not likely that the people in this thread don't know about GOG, but there's always the chance.

    I was cleaning out my bookmarks and re-discovered this gem of a site Retrospec. Retrospec specializes in re-created versions of classic ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, etc. games that you can download and play.

    Here are some screenies for Batman and Knight Lore:

    batman.f.batman03.jpg

    batman.f.batman15.jpg

    kl.f.ss6.jpg

    kl.f.ss4.jpg



    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • TurkeyTurkey So, Usoop. TampaRegistered User regular
    My PC's turbo button would boost the machine from a mere 20 MHz to 120 MHz!

  • DurkhanusDurkhanus Commander Registered User regular
    My family had an Atari console from before I was born, so I played on that until I was about 7 when my brother bought a brand new C64. Upgraded
    EvilMonkey wrote:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpAJuFVCBYY

    (Thanks to eobet for remembering the name for me)

    I unloaded the C64 at my house today, and found the cartridge for it in amongst the stuff. It should still work, but I remember that most of the disks were toast the last time I tried them. Too bad, had somewhere around 200 games as I recall. :(

    Well, I also have a Centipede cartridge. And Battlezone.

    Regarding the good old days of DOS and configuring files, I too would feel extreme satisfaction from being able to get Ultima7 to run with proper sound. I used to be able to type out all of my different configurations of autoexec.bat and config.sys from memory in those days.

    And Turbo buttons were awesome!

  • Zoku GojiraZoku Gojira Monster IslandRegistered User regular
    secret-weapons-of-the-luftwaffe-review-rate.jpg

    If World of Planes is like this... all. my. dicks.

    Hell yes.

    SWOTL was the first game I played with a really active mod community. Sure, you could open just about any DOS game in a hex editor and mess with it, sometimes in plain text. But SWOTL actually had mods like Secret Weapons of the Nachtjagdkorps, shared via BBS or embryonic internet portals.

    "Because things are the way they are, things will not stay the way they are." - Bertolt Brecht
  • citizen059citizen059 hello my name is citizen I'm from the InternetRegistered User regular
    My people! Long have I waited for your return.


    I grew up on Atari 2600, primarily because that's what we had and dammit, we're not buying any of that new crap. I never could convince my parents to let me join in on the current (for the time) generations of gaming systems, so until we got a PC in '96 (I think) that was all I had.

    I still have it, by the way, along with 120-ish games. I told my wife that if she ever tries to throw it out I'll divorce her.

  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Round Rock, TXRegistered User regular
    Ultima 7 was the one game I had separate config files for, autoexec.u7 and config.u7. The rest I would just manually edit as I needed it.

  • darleysamdarleysam On my way to UKRegistered User regular
    edited September 2011
    rikdaly wrote:
    My first computer

    cpcgreen.jpg

    Amstrad CPC464 with green screen, damn I loved that thing

    Yes. Forget your Spectrums and Commodores and whatever else, this bad boy was civilisation. I can't imagine just how misty-eyed I would get if I could ever find a working one and load up some of our old tapes.
    Banzai5150 wrote:
    Any die hard Elite players from the good old days? The fun of trying to dock with the space station while a pirate is chasing after you, only to crash as you're just about to enter. I so miss that game, and wish a modern version with 3D and what not would come out. And if there is one that I have somehow missed, is it any good?

    There's the X series (up to X3 now) which is probably the most prominent, but I don't like the way that space is divided up into zones, where you have to fly between gates to get to other places. I loved that Elite just felt like, well.. space.

    This thread.. Driller, Little Big Adventure, see this kind of thing makes me sad not just for the games I played and can barely remember, but the ones I never had the money to play. I basically played demo discs through my childhood, occasionaly saving up over months for some grand purchase. I think my proudest purchase was the X-Wing collection, because X-Wing.
    DoctorArch wrote:
    DoctorArch wrote:
    While we have a GOG thread, perhaps we should put a link in the OP, as that fits the nature of this thread well.
    Just a link to gog.com?
    Probably a link to both GOG.com and the GOG thread here on the forums. I know it's not likely that the people in this thread don't know about GOG, but there's always the chance.

    I was cleaning out my bookmarks and re-discovered this gem of a site Retrospec. Retrospec specializes in re-created versions of classic ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, etc. games that you can download and play.

    This site.. thank you. Just looking down that list, I have to get Chuckie Egg, Harrier Attack, Head Over Heels, Jet Set Willy, Manic Miner, Wizball and Zub. And they're working on Sabre Wulf? Okay, I am raiding the hell out of our tape collection and flooding my memory with all the games I played.

    darleysam on
    forumsig.png
  • KelorKelor Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    The first game I ever recall playing was Combat on the 2600. We had a few other games, but that was one of the few that I could mash on the joystick button and sometimes beat my dad on.

    Once I mastered the piloting of tanks and planes he moved me on to new games, groping my way about a pitch black house searching for treasure with just a few matchsticks to light my way, vaulting over crocodiles and rolling logs in a jungle at a friend's house and some obscure space flight game that involved some sort of arcane controller. I sucked at that game.

    Then we moved house and found ourselves with a shiny 486. I was initiated into the wonders of DOS, creating .bat files, BBS boards and feeding thirteen disks into the computer at a time while pouring through the manual for vital information to the game at hand. I remember two things that still stand out from way back then. The first was when my dad was explaining file sizes, going from bytes, to kilobytes all the way up to this new copy of Dune, that was so large it needed a CD to stream from. Megabytes. "Is there anything bigger than a megabyte Dad?" I asked.

    "There's a gigabyte, which is 1000 megabytes and so big that you could never fill up even half of it." I just downloaded Dead Island through Steam recently, which was no less than 7 gigs. Progress!

    The second was to do with a little file I saw once while my dad was fixing something through DOS. Charmap.exe. Now we'd had Ultima Underworld for long enough at this point that I to know that characters were what you played and maps were generally involved.

    "What game is that Dad?"

    "That's not a game, it's just a program for letters." Undeterred, I resolved to investigate this. Sneaking up in the middle of the night I booted up the computer, made my way through the prompts until at last I arrived at the secret game.

    I was rather disappointed.

    My brother and I were banned from playing some games my Dad felt were too adult for us. Syndicate, Darkseed, Jagged Alliance and a few others here and there. Though Doom, Mortal Kombat and Leisure Suit Larry were fine. So the sneaking up in the middle of the night became something regular for my brother and I.

    You think X-Com is creepy when you're scanning a terror mission for Chrysallids? Try it at three in the morning while discussing tactics with you brother when you hear the door handle at the other end of the hall creak as your dad gets up and you scuffle along the floor to the towel you've wedged under the door to make sure the light doesn't reflect off the floorboards and alert your parent of your nocturnal cleansing of alien scum off the face of the globe.

    Kelor on
  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Round Rock, TXRegistered User regular
    haha, reading the Strike Commander manual:
    Note: It is possible to transfer all files from the CD to your hard drive, but this is not
    given as an option because doing so fills over 150 megs on your hard drive. If that is
    really how you want to play the game, install the basic executables using any option
    given above. Then go to your CD drive prompt, and type:

    XCOPY *.* C:\(Strike directory)

    This will take quite a while, and we definitely do not recommend it.

    150MB? Scandalous!

  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks Registered User regular
    Hah,
    ²Û MONSTER BASH! Ä HORROR BY APOGEE! V2.1 Û²
    Young hero Johnny Dash visits the Under
    World of Count Chuck to save his dog, Tex.
    Over 2 Megs compressed graphics (Apogee's
    biggest game yet!).
    Full Ad Lib soundtrack
    and nightmarish Sound Blaster digitized
    effects. Two cinematic scenes. Get the
    file #1MB-PIX.ZIP for preview slide show.
    Absolutely the most animated game Apogee
    has created to date. Three skill levels.
    Joystick support, save/restore, hints, etc.
    Don't let the gruesome graphics give you
    nightmares--it's only a game!!! (v2.1)

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