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Questions, Discussion, Tutorials

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Posts

  • brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    http://www.jetpens.com/ is always worth a look for art supplies. I know they usually only cater to pen fetishes, but occasionally they carry some products that are incredibly useful and not widely available, i.e. their stock of brush pens.

  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Because I am a wise man who makes good economic decisions i spent 1395 kr on a set of 60 ShinHan Touch markers.

    23 kr or apiece which aint a bad price.

    Mostly based on availability, as of the local art shops they were the most well stocked.

    Also the larger set if i get that and some point won't contain any duplicates.

    I much appreciate the copious volumes of help!

    Now im going to go home and colour shit until my hand falls off

    Edit: ~$244 and ~$4 respectively

    Abdhyius on
    ftOqU21.png
  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    warning: buying markers is dangerous

    I've only played with them for a day and I want to buy all of the markers

    I expect starvation or creditors to kill me by the end of the month

    ftOqU21.png
  • Chop LogicChop Logic Registered User regular
    edited July 2018
    ..

    Chop Logic on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    Because I am a wise man who makes good economic decisions i spent 1395 kr on a set of 60 ShinHan Touch markers.

    23 kr or apiece which aint a bad price.

    Mostly based on availability, as of the local art shops they were the most well stocked.

    Also the larger set if i get that and some point won't contain any duplicates.

    I much appreciate the copious volumes of help!

    Now im going to go home and colour shit until my hand falls off

    Edit: ~$244 and ~$4 respectively


    Juuuust a heads up before you buy any more, that company went under like two years ago. So unfortunately, you will probably have a hard time finding refills as time goes on. You can find sets floating around on the US amazon for 187. I got a grey set for like 10 bucks when my local art chain was selling out their stock.

  • AbdhyiusAbdhyius Registered User regular
    Iruka wrote: »
    Abdhyius wrote: »
    Because I am a wise man who makes good economic decisions i spent 1395 kr on a set of 60 ShinHan Touch markers.

    23 kr or apiece which aint a bad price.

    Mostly based on availability, as of the local art shops they were the most well stocked.

    Also the larger set if i get that and some point won't contain any duplicates.

    I much appreciate the copious volumes of help!

    Now im going to go home and colour shit until my hand falls off

    Edit: ~$244 and ~$4 respectively


    Juuuust a heads up before you buy any more, that company went under like two years ago. So unfortunately, you will probably have a hard time finding refills as time goes on. You can find sets floating around on the US amazon for 187. I got a grey set for like 10 bucks when my local art chain was selling out their stock.

    !!!



    I HAVE TO BUY ALL OF THE REFILLS

    ftOqU21.png
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Chop Logic wrote: »
    Can someone take a look at this image? I have so much line art I'm trying to scan now and no matter what I do I just feel like it keeps coming out pixelated:

    8552920382_5fa5bb940a_z.jpg

    I can't tell if this is pretty good quality or very pixelated. I'm not used to working on a computer at all. I've tried used different sharpen filters and levels and curves and everything, this is about as good as it gets.

    like the left side of the leftmost leg looks SO pixelated to me... is that just how jpgs look once you get them online?

    It looks like there's a bit of jpeg compression, waaay over-sharpened, and the contrast may be set too high.

    If this is how it looks right after you scan it, your scanner definitely has some kind of post-processing filter built in (usually you can turn those off though). It will also generally save the image out as something that you choose - a jpeg, a tiff file, etc. Try to scan at a high resolution (300 dpi ideally) and take the raw image into Photoshop to do all of your contrast/color corrections. Try to also save it in a lossless format, or a high quality jpg (the higher your dpi, the less the jpg compression will matter at the scanning stage, if you're just going to save it smaller, for the web, later). If this is what it looks like after Photoshop however, the problem is that you're over-working the file.

    Using "sharpen" will destroy the ever-loving-hell out of your images. Avoid that like the plague. Once you've cleaned up all of your smudgey bits and you just have your linework available, duplicate the image, set that layer above the original layer, and run the filter Filter>Other>High Pass (or where-ever High Pass is). Set the filter amount to 1.0, run it, and then set the layer to "Overlay". This will sharpen your images more cleanly than "Sharpen" will. If the effect is too great, lower the opacity of the layer until you get something you seem happy with.

    In regards to contrast - try to keep some more of your midtones. The more black + white you go, the less of a midtone "buffer" there will be along the edges of your black pixels, and thus, they will become jagged and apparent. At the size you've posted, it may be unavoidable to completely eliminate the jaggedness/pixellation of the lines (just because the lines are so thin to begin with). However, going easy on the sharpening effects and the contrast will definitely help.

    If you're using contrast to help you clean up the image, try to clean up as much as possible by hand first (i.e. painting with the paper/background color, whatever it is at that stage, over the spots and smudges...tilt your monitor to see them more easily). The more you do by hand, the less you'll be tempted to over-correct your image through contrast adjustment.

    (Also, if you're saving the image smaller, using "image size", be aware that if you choose the "bicubic - sharper/smaller" option, it will sharpen your image, as well. Not something you want to add in if you've already done the sharpening yourself.)

    NightDragon on
  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    IT HAS BEEN SENT!
    thx for the help guys

    m3nace on
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    Do not use contractions in formal English writing.

    If something is important enough to go in this letter, it is important enough to be a sentence and not stuffed into parenthesis. Likewise, your sentences should be too important to break up with parenthetical thoughts. If you must use parentheticals use em dashes (—) rather than parenthesis, as parenthesis are old fashioned.

    In many places you are using commas to break up a sentence because it seems like you are dividing two or more thoughts and you really are not. “One of Spiegelman’s (as well as Ware’s) appeals is, that they also often reference and incorporate the history of the form (examples include In The Shadow of No Towers and Ware’s overall style)” should just be “One of Spiegelman’s appeals is that they also often reference and incorporate the history of the form.”

    Do not go into much detail about computer skills. The admissions staff probably do not care or do not know what you are talking about. Instead of “I’m relatively skilled at photoshop (CS4) and use a wacom Bamboo tablet for most of my works. I also have slight experience in 3d modelling.” say something like “I have developed intermediate digital illustration skills using 2d and 3d techniques.”

    “Perhaps if comics were a part of the public education curriculum this could be changed. I hate to see comics being coined “niche”, seeing how comics and cartoons have played an important role in history and culture around the world.” Coined niche by whom? What important roles in history and culture? These sentences make a big statement and do not back it up.

    You need to start over on this essay using what you already have as a source. Write a three paragraph answer to every question. Then print your answers out and revise them into one paragraph answers. Then rewrite that as a narrative about you. Then proofread and revise it at least ten times. Then have it proofread by adult friends who know how to write in English. Your goal should be to have an essay that not only presents you as an ideal student, but that presents you as an ideal student who knows how to tell a story.

    Hell, given the program you’re applying to, you should write the entire thing in the form of a comic.

    m3nace
  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    edit: I have now sent it, thanks for the tips supabeast.

    m3nace on
  • jwaddjwadd Registered User regular
    I hope this is the correct section to be posting this, but I just started a how to draw blog - as i really cement my method for drawing down i want to record my process in order to share it with others. Anyway my site can be found here. the art blog page is here.

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    @jwadd just link to your site in your signature and people will check it out, we don't need it posted in here and the doodle thread and the enrichment thread.

  • Chop LogicChop Logic Registered User regular
    Chop Logic wrote: »
    Can someone take a look at this image? I have so much line art I'm trying to scan now and no matter what I do I just feel like it keeps coming out pixelated:

    8552920382_5fa5bb940a_z.jpg

    I can't tell if this is pretty good quality or very pixelated. I'm not used to working on a computer at all. I've tried used different sharpen filters and levels and curves and everything, this is about as good as it gets.

    like the left side of the leftmost leg looks SO pixelated to me... is that just how jpgs look once you get them online?

    It looks like there's a bit of jpeg compression, waaay over-sharpened, and the contrast may be set too high.

    If this is how it looks right after you scan it, your scanner definitely has some kind of post-processing filter built in (usually you can turn those off though). It will also generally save the image out as something that you choose - a jpeg, a tiff file, etc. Try to scan at a high resolution (300 dpi ideally) and take the raw image into Photoshop to do all of your contrast/color corrections. Try to also save it in a lossless format, or a high quality jpg (the higher your dpi, the less the jpg compression will matter at the scanning stage, if you're just going to save it smaller, for the web, later). If this is what it looks like after Photoshop however, the problem is that you're over-working the file.

    Using "sharpen" will destroy the ever-loving-hell out of your images. Avoid that like the plague. Once you've cleaned up all of your smudgey bits and you just have your linework available, duplicate the image, set that layer above the original layer, and run the filter Filter>Other>High Pass (or where-ever High Pass is). Set the filter amount to 1.0, run it, and then set the layer to "Overlay". This will sharpen your images more cleanly than "Sharpen" will. If the effect is too great, lower the opacity of the layer until you get something you seem happy with.

    In regards to contrast - try to keep some more of your midtones. The more black + white you go, the less of a midtone "buffer" there will be along the edges of your black pixels, and thus, they will become jagged and apparent. At the size you've posted, it may be unavoidable to completely eliminate the jaggedness/pixellation of the lines (just because the lines are so thin to begin with). However, going easy on the sharpening effects and the contrast will definitely help.

    If you're using contrast to help you clean up the image, try to clean up as much as possible by hand first (i.e. painting with the paper/background color, whatever it is at that stage, over the spots and smudges...tilt your monitor to see them more easily). The more you do by hand, the less you'll be tempted to over-correct your image through contrast adjustment.

    (Also, if you're saving the image smaller, using "image size", be aware that if you choose the "bicubic - sharper/smaller" option, it will sharpen your image, as well. Not something you want to add in if you've already done the sharpening yourself.)

    THIS helps so much, thanks a lot. I've been overdosing on the sharpen filter, so maybe I'll (definitely) put it back on the shelf. I'll post my site somewhere around here when I'm done.

  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    If you're gonna use sharpen at all on lineart use unsharpen mask (amount 145, radius 2).
    My process for scanning lineart is usually scan -> levels adjustment -> unsharp mask -> threshold, assuming you've got 300 or more dpi scan.

  • FlayFlay Registered User regular
    A lot of drawing tutorials have the preface 'if you can draw a cube you can draw x', but I've been trying and I can't seem to make my cubes cube-like, or my cylinders cylindrical. How does one go about developing a better understanding of form? Should I do perspective studies? Sketch out some basic solids in sketchup? Or is it just something that develops over time?

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Flay wrote: »
    A lot of drawing tutorials have the preface 'if you can draw a cube you can draw x', but I've been trying and I can't seem to make my cubes cube-like, or my cylinders cylindrical. How does one go about developing a better understanding of form? Should I do perspective studies? Sketch out some basic solids in sketchup? Or is it just something that develops over time?

    I'm guessing this is stemming from your ellipticals (at the ends of cylinders) not being accurate, and your cubes having a side or two that is too long (or not at the proper angles, etc). If that's the case, I'd suggest just doing a number of perspective studies (in-person would be best, photographs 2nd best, but I'd say don't bother with 3D programs, because they often skew the field-of-vision which results in wacky perspectives).

    Look up "circle in perspective" on Google - that'd be a good start. A lot of it is probably just training yourself to know what specifically is wrong (and thus, how it is fixed) if your drawing looks incorrect....but hey! On the plus side, you've developed the ability to at least see something is off...and that's the bigger hurdle, IMO.

    Do you has examplesss? That's just a guess based on what you mentioned, but it could be a few things. If your pieces look weird shaded, that's a bit different...but if the forms are wrong themselves, what I suggested is probably valid.

    NightDragon on
  • jwaddjwadd Registered User regular
    Flay wrote: »
    A lot of drawing tutorials have the preface 'if you can draw a cube you can draw x', but I've been trying and I can't seem to make my cubes cube-like, or my cylinders cylindrical. How does one go about developing a better understanding of form? Should I do perspective studies? Sketch out some basic solids in sketchup? Or is it just something that develops over time?

    I'm guessing this is stemming from your ellipticals (at the ends of cylinders) not being accurate, and your cubes having a side or two that is too long (or not at the proper angles, etc). If that's the case, I'd suggest just doing a number of perspective studies (in-person would be best, photographs 2nd best, but I'd say don't bother with 3D programs, because they often skew the field-of-vision which results in wacky perspectives).

    Look up "circle in perspective" on Google - that'd be a good start. A lot of it is probably just training yourself to know what specifically is wrong (and thus, how it is fixed) if your drawing looks incorrect....but hey! On the plus side, you've developed the ability to at least see something is off...and that's the bigger hurdle, IMO.

    Do you has examplesss? That's just a guess based on what you mentioned, but it could be a few things. If your pieces look weird shaded, that's a bit different...but if the forms are wrong themselves, what I suggested is probably valid.

    This and be sure not to be staring at your pencil when youre drawing something in front of you. Its staring at the cube in front of you with occasional glances back down at your paper

    It should be 80% looking at object 20% at your paper

    source: still life drawing class

  • jwaddjwadd Registered User regular
    Flay wrote: »
    A lot of drawing tutorials have the preface 'if you can draw a cube you can draw x', but I've been trying and I can't seem to make my cubes cube-like, or my cylinders cylindrical. How does one go about developing a better understanding of form? Should I do perspective studies? Sketch out some basic solids in sketchup? Or is it just something that develops over time?

    I'm guessing this is stemming from your ellipticals (at the ends of cylinders) not being accurate, and your cubes having a side or two that is too long (or not at the proper angles, etc). If that's the case, I'd suggest just doing a number of perspective studies (in-person would be best, photographs 2nd best, but I'd say don't bother with 3D programs, because they often skew the field-of-vision which results in wacky perspectives).

    Look up "circle in perspective" on Google - that'd be a good start. A lot of it is probably just training yourself to know what specifically is wrong (and thus, how it is fixed) if your drawing looks incorrect....but hey! On the plus side, you've developed the ability to at least see something is off...and that's the bigger hurdle, IMO.

    Do you has examplesss? That's just a guess based on what you mentioned, but it could be a few things. If your pieces look weird shaded, that's a bit different...but if the forms are wrong themselves, what I suggested is probably valid.

    This and be sure not to be staring at your pencil when youre drawing something in front of you. Its staring at the cube in front of you with occasional glances back down at your paper

    It should be 80% looking at object 20% at your paper

    source: still life drawing class

  • rtsrts Registered User regular
    Does anyone know if it's possible to make it so when you use the eyedropper in photoshop it only picks the grey desaturated value of whatever color you are picking instead of the color?

    skype: rtschutter
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    If you color pick from an RBG/CYMK image while actively using a greyscale image, I guess. you could have a window to the side to use as a pallet.

    If there is a way to do it to the actual tool, I don't know it.

  • rtsrts Registered User regular
    Whoa Iruka is a mod!

    skype: rtschutter
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    I don't think there's a way to do that, Ryan. Unless you can maybe create an action or script that, upon a certain keystroke, desaturates the picture, lets you eyedropper a section, and then on key release "undo's" the desaturate action or script?

  • FlayFlay Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Thanks ND, and jwadd! I don't have any examples to show at the moment (I have a bad habit of erasing things and starting over when I make a mistake) but I've just started going through Loomis's 'successful drawing', so I'll try and post some in the near future. I'll try to do a combination of basic forms that have been constructed using perspective rules, and studies from life. Hopefully I can find a place to buy some basic, white shapes.

    Flay on
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    rts wrote: »
    Whoa Iruka is a mod!

    Yep!
    I don't think there's a way to do that, Ryan. Unless you can maybe create an action or script that, upon a certain keystroke, desaturates the picture, lets you eyedropper a section, and then on key release "undo's" the desaturate action or script?

    I've never tried doing this kind of thing. Would it bog down the program to have it do that, Or would it feel just as quick as color picking?

    Having a small, greyscale mode window open will work, though. It may not be fast if you don't have a crap ton of monitor space.

  • rtsrts Registered User regular
    Haha and @NightDragon is jailed. I hope these two things are related.

    Anyways, thanks for the help guys but guess I will just keep doing what I am doing...which is to draw on a separate layer and then eventually desaturate that. Was just trying to cut out the middle man.

    skype: rtschutter
  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    The easiest way to do it would be just to make a hotkeyed action that sets the saturation value of your currently selected color to zero- but apparently recording doing that with the action recorder has it set the value and hue as well.

    You might be able to make a .jsx script that does it and then just make an action that runs that, but you'd have to figure out what all this shit means:
    // =======================================================
    var idsetd = charIDToTypeID( "setd" );
    var desc5 = new ActionDescriptor();
    var idnull = charIDToTypeID( "null" );
    var ref2 = new ActionReference();
    var idClr = charIDToTypeID( "Clr " );
    var idFrgC = charIDToTypeID( "FrgC" );
    ref2.putProperty( idClr, idFrgC );
    desc5.putReference( idnull, ref2 );
    var idT = charIDToTypeID( "T " );
    var desc6 = new ActionDescriptor();
    var idH = charIDToTypeID( "H " );
    var idAng = charIDToTypeID( "#Ang" );
    desc6.putUnitDouble( idH, idAng, 222.000732 );
    var idStrt = charIDToTypeID( "Strt" );
    desc6.putDouble( idStrt, 0.000000 );
    var idBrgh = charIDToTypeID( "Brgh" );
    desc6.putDouble( idBrgh, 25.999847 );
    var idHSBC = charIDToTypeID( "HSBC" );
    desc5.putObject( idT, idHSBC, desc6 );
    var idSrce = charIDToTypeID( "Srce" );
    desc5.putString( idSrce, """photoshopPicker""" );
    executeAction( idsetd, desc5, DialogModes.NO );

    Using the Adobe ScriptListener plug-in, that's apparently all the shit that goes into picking a color with the color picker. I think.
    http://www.adobe.com/devnet/photoshop/scripting.html

    On the other hand, unless you are really doing this a whole hell of a lot and you're pretty savvy with programming, it's probably just going to be easier to go into the color picker and type "0" in the "S" field by hand.

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    rts wrote: »
    Haha and @NightDragon is jailed. I hope these two things are related.

    Nope! Tube got me for being just too cool for school.

    .........also I posted a .gif that I wasn't aware was big.

    I am the most scandalous

    NightDragon on
  • TayaTaya Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Does anyone have any experience with glazing? My painting instructor told us to paint our initial underpainting using yellow ochre. I've started the glazing process and I've noticed two things: everything is yellowish, and my shadows and dark tones are disappearing. I've looked online and it seems that every glazing video and webpage uses grey or brown in their underpainting. Any tips on how to prevent my painting from becoming a big yellow blob?

    edit: Here's a photo. You can see the shininess of the glazing, but everything is so yellow and blah. The folds of the fabric are disappearing and unless I ditch the glazing process I can't get them back. I think my instructor made a mistake. Everything I've seen online about glazing does this completely different.

    IMG_0886.jpg

    Taya on
  • nakirushnakirush Registered User regular
    So recently my seven year old Cintiq crapped out and I made the decision to switch (downgrade?) to a Intuos. My question is if you guys have any recommendations for making the transition easier? I'm getting frustrated feeling like I've lost years of practice...

  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    I guess you mean the difference like now you are watching the monitor with the tablet to your side and it feels weird?

    To me that was just practice, it starts feeling very normal quickly. I'd say give it a month or so and try to play with it a bit daily to maximize the getting-used to it factor.

    PSN: Honkalot
  • F87F87 So Say We All Registered User regular
    I'm switching through "modes" on my monitor (like cinema, gaming, text, etc.) and it makes my painting look vastly different in terms of saturation and value.

    What should I do? D:

  • GethGeth Legion Perseus VeilRegistered User, Moderator, Penny Arcade Staff, Vanilla Staff vanilla
    F87 has been kidnapped by tynic and is being held for ransom! Solve the riddle to set em' free, or I'll hand em' over to Clamps!

    A tale as old as TIME? Psh, I would know.
    That Beast ain’t shit, I’m the real beauty
    I knew Noah biblically (no homo)
    Now gimmie a clam to break on my tummy
    Which forumer am I?

  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    F87 wrote: »
    I'm switching through "modes" on my monitor (like cinema, gaming, text, etc.) and it makes my painting look vastly different in terms of saturation and value.

    What should I do? D:

    If you’re doing work for print you should buy a monitor calibration system.

    Otherwise, just stick to what makes you happy. Because nobody else is ever going to have a monitor with colors that match yours anyway! Light is a cunt that way.

  • SteveRageSteveRage Registered User regular
    i have a question that i'm not sure has been answered yet. i've been away from doing any kind art for a number of years now and having a bit of trouble getting back into it. the OP has a ton of useful links that i'll be looking at, but right now i feel a need to just open photoshop and draaaaaw, so my question (and apologies if i missed this being answered elsewhere) what is your preferred canvas size for something about the size of a 3 panel comic strip?
    it's been so long that i don't even know what my old brush settings were, so it feels a bit daunting to start over again.
    thanks in advance.

    -in warframe, i am fungible-
  • Red RaevynRed Raevyn because I only take Bubble Baths Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    Flay wrote: »
    It's only the first lesson of the series, but the exercises in this video helped me a lot.

    I'm digging this up from the past, but, I am trying these exercises and I think I am getting a lot of bleed. I'm using cheap printer paper and a uni-ball Onyx (best I have at work) and the line gets fatter and it's hard to tell the difference between straight ink bleed and me deviating from the line. I feel like using a mechanical pencil might be a good idea, since I'm just going for line consistency here. Seems like most of what he says about pen choice is for future exercises. Thoughts?
    Edit: Haha nevermind, definitely me not keeping it right on the line. Could be worse, though.

    Red Raevyn on
  • ninjaininjai Registered User regular
    Hey guys, found some informative and inspirational videos on youtube in the last few weeks. Thought I'd share them.

    This guy is amazing, check out his other videos.




    Here's another one that I pretty much used the same method for doing my sketching with pen.

    mageormike
  • ninjaininjai Registered User regular
    Guys. New Enrichment Thread.

    Do some stuff and get learned.

    I've been considering picking up watercolor over summer break, and have no fucking idea where to get started. it's a much more complex medium than I knew, and ultra expensive. I want to branch out and try color stuff, but how do I do it in a way that 1. doesn't break the bank, and 2. is simple enough for me to pick up on my own?

  • squidbunnysquidbunny Registered User regular
    SteveRage wrote: »
    i have a question that i'm not sure has been answered yet. i've been away from doing any kind art for a number of years now and having a bit of trouble getting back into it. the OP has a ton of useful links that i'll be looking at, but right now i feel a need to just open photoshop and draaaaaw, so my question (and apologies if i missed this being answered elsewhere) what is your preferred canvas size for something about the size of a 3 panel comic strip?
    it's been so long that i don't even know what my old brush settings were, so it feels a bit daunting to start over again.
    thanks in advance.

    Everyone will give you a different answer to this, informed by their personal preferences and their computer's capabilities. I'd work as large as you and your hardware are comfortable with: this makes strokes smoother and makes print at various sizes possible if you should ever so desire. I'm usually at around 4500px wide for comics.

    header_image_sm.jpg
    tynic
  • AvrahamAvraham Registered User regular
    ninjai wrote: »
    Guys. New Enrichment Thread.

    Do some stuff and get learned.

    I've been considering picking up watercolor over summer break, and have no fucking idea where to get started. it's a much more complex medium than I knew, and ultra expensive. I want to branch out and try color stuff, but how do I do it in a way that 1. doesn't break the bank, and 2. is simple enough for me to pick up on my own?

    Here's an intro.
    It's not too expensive if you just get one or two brushes and 3 or 6 tiny tubes of the primaries, plus sepia. The paper can get a bit pricey. Put some apples and oranges under a lamp on your desk and get started.
    In some ways watercolor is easier than oil because you don't have to fool around with solvents. Colors get lighter in value as you add water and desaturated as you mix pigments. It's really not intimidating.

    :bz: :bz: :bzz:
    ninjai
  • Lewis RiceLewis Rice Registered User regular
    Did anyone on here get a Wacom Inkling? I just stumbled across an article from back when it was announced. I completely forgot about them!

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