Options

Homeland[sho] - She's not crazy, simply in love!

2456717

Posts

  • Options
    surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    also

    WE NEED AN AMERICAN SOLDIER

    WE NEED A BLACK CIA GUY

    CAST ENGLISH ACTORS PRONTO

    obF2Wuw.png
  • Options
    TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    Homeland's been Renewed for season 2

    Not sure how I feel about that. I love the show, but I would hope that the "Is he a terrorist" thing would be wrapped up this season and not sure what the show would do without that.

    Guess I'll wait to find out.

  • Options
    Captain TragedyCaptain Tragedy Registered User regular
    Yeah, the whole "how is this an ongoing series?" thing is a concern that a lot of reviews have brought up. The creators of the show have said they know where they're going past S1, but...well, of course they would say that - they're not going to go, "Yeah, we don't know what the hell we're going to do past Season 1."

    I figure I'm not going to worry about it until we get there.

  • Options
    surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    i trust them to do it well

    so far the show seems nicely low-key and controlled

    obF2Wuw.png
  • Options
    ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor changed Registered User regular
    Even in a
    ----
    Is he a terrorist?

    End of S1: Nope, this guy is.

    S2: Let's find that guy!
    ----
    situation, his whole family is going to stop being relevant once his status is resolved, and that's going to be a huge shift in theme from what we've seen.

    I've been kind of hoping this would be a one-shot, but I'll just have to wait and see where they go.

  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    Tomanta wrote:
    Homeland's been Renewed for season 2

    Not sure how I feel about that. I love the show, but I would hope that the "Is he a terrorist" thing would be wrapped up this season and not sure what the show would do without that.

    Guess I'll wait to find out.

    God fucking damn it. Let the filler episodes begin;o(.

  • Options
    dlinfinitidlinfiniti Registered User regular
    no way
    our favorite terrorist hunter is still unemployed
    they needed a season to lay down the backstory so that we can bring jack bauer back into the game

    AAAAA!!! PLAAAYGUUU!!!!
  • Options
    GospreyGosprey Registered User regular
    Ugh. Getting a second series is just bad news.

  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    Gosprey wrote:
    Ugh. Getting a second series is just bad news.

    Uh, why? Because it's impossible that they'll have consistantly good writing?

  • Options
    GospreyGosprey Registered User regular
    I remember a similar series for tone and subject matter, which was Sleeper Cell. The first series was entirely self-contained and was frankly excellent, but the second series was just kind of embarrassing.

    They could come up with something clever, but given how this has been set up, it looks perfect as a one-series show.

  • Options
    HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    edited October 2011
    i trust them to do it well

    so far the show seems nicely low-key and controlled

    That's because they've got Henry Bromell as a consulting producer. He's the guy responsible for such shows as Brotherhood and Rubicon. If there's one guy who knows well how to hold tight the leash of the thriller genre, it's him.

    Also Blake Masters.

    Hacksaw on
  • Options
    HozHoz Cool Cat Registered User regular
    What's with people thinking Sleeper Cell was any good ever.

    That show was terrible from the start.

  • Options
    HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    I'm going to send Michael Ealy to your house to kill you.

  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    Hoz wrote:
    What's with people thinking Sleeper Cell was any good ever.

    That show was terrible from the start.

    It was fucking excellent and you are a flock of geese.



  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    So, speculating.

    The traitor is
    David, the CIA director guy. Carrie's ex. Saul is just too obvious a candidate, and we need him to be around for next season, because Mandy Patinkin is awesome. Saul probably gets David's job.

    Anyway, we know David has been in the field, because that's where he had his thing with Carrie. I suspect we'll learn more about that time period fairly soon. He also had the opportunity to slip the prisoner a razor blade... not only that, but he could pin it on Brody. The whole "let me confront my attacker" thing from Brody was not, in my estimation, enough to jepordize homeland security if David were being responsible.

    More speculation:
    Brody says that he wanted to kill the guy, but he didn't. The polygraph test confirms that he's telling the truth.

  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    ...but....but..... I want Brody to be the bad guy;o(

  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    zeeny wrote:
    ...but....but..... I want Brody to be the bad guy;o(

    Tough?

  • Options
    KanaKana Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    Hacksaw wrote:
    i trust them to do it well

    so far the show seems nicely low-key and controlled

    That's because they've got Henry Bromell as a consulting producer. He's the guy responsible for such shows as Brotherhood and Rubicon. If there's one guy who knows well how to hold tight the leash of the thriller genre, it's him.

    Also Blake Masters.

    I'm not so sure I'd be quoting Rubicon in his favor. It had promise, but it was just filled with bizarrely bad writing decisions.

    Kana on
    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • Options
    Captain TragedyCaptain Tragedy Registered User regular
    I liked Rubicon, but it suffered a bit for the fact that the original showrunner who made the pilot (and wanted it to be more in the style of a slow burning 70's conspiracy thriller) was replaced with Henry Bromell, who was more interested in the day to day running of API and the people working there. That new focus wasn't a bad thing (actually I quite liked it), but he still had to service the original conspiracy plot set in place at the beginning, and those two ideas kinda bumped heads in awkward ways at times.

    I feel like if the show had a 2nd season entirely under Bromell, it could have been really great, but...oh well.

  • Options
    Captain TragedyCaptain Tragedy Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    Sal better not be the mole, Homeland writers. Hopefully, that reaction to the first time he was asked about the razor was just a red herring.

    After all, you gotta expect fuck-ups when Rusty Venture is running your polygraph machine.

    Captain Tragedy on
  • Options
    ED!ED! Registered User regular
    Sal better not be the mole, Homeland writers. Hopefully, that reaction to the first time he was asked about the razor was just a red herring.

    After all, you gotta expect fuck-ups when Rusty Venture is running your polygraph machine.

    This show is full of Herrings. Anyone who thinks Brody is the threat is crazy. He's hiding something, but there's no way its him. His little reveals have just been too well played.

    I do agree with some criticisms though; how the hell can this be stretched out? Two seasons, yes - I can handle that, with another mystery thrown in before the "Who is the threat. . ." plot resolved. Anything more is nonsense.

    "Get the hell out of me" - [ex]girlfriend
  • Options
    HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    I liked Rubicon, but it suffered a bit for the fact that the original showrunner who made the pilot (and wanted it to be more in the style of a slow burning 70's conspiracy thriller) was replaced with Henry Bromell, who was more interested in the day to day running of API and the people working there. That new focus wasn't a bad thing (actually I quite liked it), but he still had to service the original conspiracy plot set in place at the beginning, and those two ideas kinda bumped heads in awkward ways at times.

    I feel like if the show had a 2nd season entirely under Bromell, it could have been really great, but...oh well.

    I blame AMC for that. Firing the show's creator was a mistake. You don't ditch good show runners and expect your series to do well.

  • Options
    surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    i love how they pretend in these shows that polygraphs are worth a shit

    everybody knows they're terrible and especially the CIA

    obF2Wuw.png
  • Options
    Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    This show kicks so much ass.

    I love how he looked into the camera for the last question.

    a7iea7nzewtq.jpg
  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    This show kicks so much ass.

    I love how he looked into the camera for the last question.

    That was pretty awesome. And also, incidentally, it's how I know for sure that
    he's not the terrorist. He knows that Carrie is watching and that she knows he's lying about the affair. If he actually did slip the guy the razor, he'd be pointing that big ol' cannon in his own direction by revealing his ability to fool a polygraph. He just wants Carrie to know that he can keep her secret.

    This episode confirmed my belief that
    David Estes is the mole. He was the only other person besides Carrie, Saul, and Brody that we saw take the test, and he was clearly uncomfortable, making bad jokes and such, despite the fact that we don't know about any other trouble he might be having in his life (unlike Saul, with his marital problems). It's either him or the SEAL team that has the mole, and I don't think any of us want to consider that these days.

    Dracomicron on
  • Options
    surrealitychecksurrealitycheck lonely, but not unloved dreaming of faulty keys and latchesRegistered User regular
    poor old Saul

    obF2Wuw.png
  • Options
    TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    This episode confirmed my belief that
    David Estes is the mole. He was the only other person besides Carrie, Saul, and Brody that we saw take the test, and he was clearly uncomfortable, making bad jokes and such, despite the fact that we don't know about any other trouble he might be having in his life (unlike Saul, with his marital problems). It's either him or the SEAL team that has the mole, and I don't think any of us want to consider that these days.

    This theory also fits in with
    David wanting to know what Carrie is up to. Either to make sure she isn't looking into him, or so he can try to use it to his advantage.
    If David is the mole, I wouldn't be surprised to see the season end with David framing Brody to save his own ass.

    This show has established a very delicate balance of progressing the plot in a gripping manner without actually revealing any of the cards in its hand.

    Tomanta on
  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    Fuck you all. Brody is the bad guy. BROOOODYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY.

  • Options
    KanaKana Registered User regular
    Hacksaw wrote:
    I liked Rubicon, but it suffered a bit for the fact that the original showrunner who made the pilot (and wanted it to be more in the style of a slow burning 70's conspiracy thriller) was replaced with Henry Bromell, who was more interested in the day to day running of API and the people working there. That new focus wasn't a bad thing (actually I quite liked it), but he still had to service the original conspiracy plot set in place at the beginning, and those two ideas kinda bumped heads in awkward ways at times.

    I feel like if the show had a 2nd season entirely under Bromell, it could have been really great, but...oh well.

    I blame AMC for that. Firing the show's creator was a mistake. You don't ditch good show runners and expect your series to do well.

    Rubicon definitely had some good ideas. I loved how the conspirators actually had normal, day to day lives. I loved the gay boss, and how he wasn't so much in the closet as just so habitually secretive he wouldn't have told you who's in the world series. In fact most of the side characters were great. Some of the suspense sequences were very well done.

    Things I hated:
    Possibly the most boring, bland, cardboardy main character I've ever seen. He's not so much a personality as just a series of actions. Seriously, Law & Order characters are more fleshed out. The widow was the same way - we never really had any sense of her emotional connection to her husband, it's just now he's dead so she spends half the season wandering around deserted buildings looking pensive. A lot of the puzzles weren't very well presented - instead of figuring things out along with, or one step behind our hero, we're pretty much just shown something that looks ordinary, and then 10 minutes later he goes "ah hah I have figured out the mystery code this pleases me. Beep." You don't even get to say 'ooh, that's clever.' It's just, uh, okay? Whatever you say CompuProtagonist 500. The retired former analyst just sort of disappears from the story for no reason. None of the other analysts seem to have any idea how to actually do their job, and instead spend their time standing around arguing about if it's right for them to do so. You'd think they'd have already discussed these moral qualms before sending in the resumes. Most of the plot progression depends on Hardy Boys style "Gosh, I've come to a blank wall in my investigations. Nothing I can do now, unless the villains send a hitman after me to give me another clue..." If the conspiracy had just ignored the protagonist he never would've even kept investigating, but instead they keep doing just enough to keep him going. And then we've got his neighbor who we see, alone, going 'oh god a gun' when it drops out of his bag, and yet turns out to be an undercover spy / assassin lady in the final episode, which just makes no sense.

    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • Options
    DaxonDaxon Registered User regular
    Really like this show.

    Perhaps crazy CIA agent lady (can't remember her name atm) gets turned and then Brody has to prove she's the baddy now!

  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    Daxon wrote:
    Really like this show.

    Perhaps crazy CIA agent lady (can't remember her name atm) gets turned and then Brody has to prove she's the baddy now!

    Carrie? No, Carrie would never get turned. She likes nailing the bad guys (*ahem*) too much to switch sides.

  • Options
    HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    Kana wrote:
    Hacksaw wrote:
    I liked Rubicon, but it suffered a bit for the fact that the original showrunner who made the pilot (and wanted it to be more in the style of a slow burning 70's conspiracy thriller) was replaced with Henry Bromell, who was more interested in the day to day running of API and the people working there. That new focus wasn't a bad thing (actually I quite liked it), but he still had to service the original conspiracy plot set in place at the beginning, and those two ideas kinda bumped heads in awkward ways at times.

    I feel like if the show had a 2nd season entirely under Bromell, it could have been really great, but...oh well.

    I blame AMC for that. Firing the show's creator was a mistake. You don't ditch good show runners and expect your series to do well.

    Rubicon definitely had some good ideas. I loved how the conspirators actually had normal, day to day lives. I loved the gay boss, and how he wasn't so much in the closet as just so habitually secretive he wouldn't have told you who's in the world series. In fact most of the side characters were great. Some of the suspense sequences were very well done.

    Things I hated:
    Possibly the most boring, bland, cardboardy main character I've ever seen. He's not so much a personality as just a series of actions. Seriously, Law & Order characters are more fleshed out. The widow was the same way - we never really had any sense of her emotional connection to her husband, it's just now he's dead so she spends half the season wandering around deserted buildings looking pensive. A lot of the puzzles weren't very well presented - instead of figuring things out along with, or one step behind our hero, we're pretty much just shown something that looks ordinary, and then 10 minutes later he goes "ah hah I have figured out the mystery code this pleases me. Beep." You don't even get to say 'ooh, that's clever.' It's just, uh, okay? Whatever you say CompuProtagonist 500. The retired former analyst just sort of disappears from the story for no reason. None of the other analysts seem to have any idea how to actually do their job, and instead spend their time standing around arguing about if it's right for them to do so. You'd think they'd have already discussed these moral qualms before sending in the resumes. Most of the plot progression depends on Hardy Boys style "Gosh, I've come to a blank wall in my investigations. Nothing I can do now, unless the villains send a hitman after me to give me another clue..." If the conspiracy had just ignored the protagonist he never would've even kept investigating, but instead they keep doing just enough to keep him going. And then we've got his neighbor who we see, alone, going 'oh god a gun' when it drops out of his bag, and yet turns out to be an undercover spy / assassin lady in the final episode, which just makes no sense.

    All of these things are things I'm confident would have been sorted out in the second season, once they'd shaken off Horwitch's baggage. But sadly they never got the chance.

  • Options
    SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    This show kicks so much ass.

    I love how he looked into the camera for the last question.

    That was pretty awesome. And also, incidentally, it's how I know for sure that
    he's not the terrorist. He knows that Carrie is watching and that she knows he's lying about the affair. If he actually did slip the guy the razor, he'd be pointing that big ol' cannon in his own direction by revealing his ability to fool a polygraph. He just wants Carrie to know that he can keep her secret.
    I don't think he did it to prove he can keep a secret, I think he did it just because he knew that Carrie was there.

    I'm not saying he's a double agent, but I do think he is coming around to the idea that Carrie thinks he is. Brody had sex with her, and suddenly he's being asked if he's ever had sex outside of his marriage? Something's off about that, and Brody is about to confront Carrie about it.

    sig.gif
  • Options
    iguanacusiguanacus Desert PlanetRegistered User regular
    Well, now that was a head-fake.

  • Options
    ED!ED! Registered User regular
    What the hell? I'm calling bullshit. . .but the scenes from next weeks episode kinda make it seem like "Yep. . .this is where we are going with this." At least the result didn't seem as out of left field as THE KILLINGS season finale did.

    "Get the hell out of me" - [ex]girlfriend
  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    The fuck was that.;o/

  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    Wow, fished in. Didn't expect that one. Well, except that
    Brody's story pretty much checks out

    There's gotta be more to it, though because
    someone DID slip the AQ guard a razor, AND someone warned the sleepers at the house. Homeless Dead Sniper Guy could not have easily done those things.

  • Options
    ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor changed Registered User regular
    Wow, fished in. Didn't expect that one. Well, except that
    Brody's story pretty much checks out

    There's gotta be more to it, though because
    someone DID slip the AQ guard a razor, AND someone warned the sleepers at the house. Homeless Dead Sniper Guy could not have easily done those things.

    It seemed strange to me that
    They're out to kill the president. That seems like a domestic agenda. Wasn't that White House lady who came to see David about Brody's mental state attached to the Vice President? Because that guy would stand to gain more than AQ from killing the Commander in Chief.

  • Options
    DracomicronDracomicron Registered User regular
    Wow, fished in. Didn't expect that one. Well, except that
    Brody's story pretty much checks out

    There's gotta be more to it, though because
    someone DID slip the AQ guard a razor, AND someone warned the sleepers at the house. Homeless Dead Sniper Guy could not have easily done those things.

    It seemed strange to me that
    They're out to kill the president. That seems like a domestic agenda. Wasn't that White House lady who came to see David about Brody's mental state attached to the Vice President? Because that guy would stand to gain more than AQ from killing the Commander in Chief.

    Good catch. There've been a lot of things that looked like red herrings that may be actual clues.
    Pinning the president's assassination on Al-Qaida would be some LBJ-level skullduggery. At the moment, though, it sure seems like that would require an alliance with A-Q, which seems like an odd circumstance.

  • Options
    HozHoz Cool Cat Registered User regular
    Yeah, if they go into government conspiracy territory then I am going to stop watching and dedicate all efforts to forgetting that this show ever existed.

Sign In or Register to comment.