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Computer Build Thread: Old Dead Thread, Read New Thread

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  • The Dude With HerpesThe Dude With Herpes Lehi, UTRegistered User regular
    Which one is "nonreference"?

    Steam: Galedrid - XBL: Galedrid - PSN: Galedrid
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  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    This one. Its kind of surprising the non-reference ones run cooler since the reference use waterblocks (I believe, its been a long time since Ive looked into that) and the non-reference are quieter (which, if my GTX 570 is any indication, is nice but ultimately doesnt mean a whole lot as its easily the loudest thing in my case).

    emp123 on
  • The Dude With HerpesThe Dude With Herpes Lehi, UTRegistered User regular
    edited October 2011
    I never had any complaints about the sound level of my 460, until it started overheating and dieing last week, so hopefully having 2 doesn't bug me. I mean, it was definitely the loudest thing in my case, but eh. The rare times I have everything muted and don't have headphones on listening to something, I'm usually being spoken to anyway so I generally just ignore it.

    Now however, I can pretty much know to the second when my PC is going to crash based on the fan sound on my card.

    The Dude With Herpes on
    Steam: Galedrid - XBL: Galedrid - PSN: Galedrid
    Origin: Galedrid - Nintendo: Galedrid/3222-6858-1045
    Blizzard: Galedrid#1367 - FFXIV: Galedrid Kingshand

  • AlectharAlecthar Alan Shore We're not territorial about that sort of thing, are we?Registered User regular
    emp123 wrote:
    This one. Its kind of surprising the non-reference ones run cooler since the reference use waterblocks (I believe, its been a long time since Ive looked into that) and the non-reference are quieter (which, if my GTX 570 is any indication, is nice but ultimately doesnt mean a whole lot as its easily the loudest thing in my case).

    Waterblocks? You might be thinking of vapor chambers, which are potentially in use on the non-ref card as well (it refers to the heatpipe type, really). A lot of factors can contribute to temperature, later non-ref cards may exhibit better temperature profiles than earlier reference cards due in part to better silicon or different VRM setups. And generally speaking the larger fans used to exhaust air inside the case are quieter than the "blower" fans used in most reference card coolers.

    Waterblocks are heatsinks designed to have liquid coolant run through them for the purposes of cooling the card.

  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    Alecthar wrote:
    emp123 wrote:
    This one. Its kind of surprising the non-reference ones run cooler since the reference use waterblocks (I believe, its been a long time since Ive looked into that) and the non-reference are quieter (which, if my GTX 570 is any indication, is nice but ultimately doesnt mean a whole lot as its easily the loudest thing in my case).

    Waterblocks? You might be thinking of vapor chambers, which are potentially in use on the non-ref card as well (it refers to the heatpipe type, really). A lot of factors can contribute to temperature, later non-ref cards may exhibit better temperature profiles than earlier reference cards due in part to better silicon or different VRM setups. And generally speaking the larger fans used to exhaust air inside the case are quieter than the "blower" fans used in most reference card coolers.

    Waterblocks are heatsinks designed to have liquid coolant run through them for the purposes of cooling the card.

    Yeah, I was totally thinking vapor chambers.

    Oh, one downside about the EVGA non-reference design - it vents out of your case and inside it which can lead to slightly higher case/cpu temps. I personally havent noticed (although I honestly have nothing to compare it to) as my CPU hits 60ish under heavy load (and thats with my H70 acting as an exhaust and not like an intake like Corsair recommends).

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

  • bobsbarricadesbobsbarricades Registered User regular
    Pirusu wrote:
    Depending on model year, your MBP should have the digital out/mini jack in the same port.

    You'd just need your toslink cable, and something like this

    well thats just nifty! I have a 3,1 and it *seems* to have optical out, though I can't find a confirmation tech spec page =/

  • minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Pirusu wrote:
    Depending on model year, your MBP should have the digital out/mini jack in the same port.

    You'd just need your toslink cable, and something like this

    well thats just nifty! I have a 3,1 and it *seems* to have optical out, though I can't find a confirmation tech spec page =/

    It should. Pick up a 75 cent mini optical jack adapter and you'll be golden.

    if you're gonna try to walk on water make sure you wear your comfortable shoes
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    Peen wrote:
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

    A nettop with Nvidia ION is probably your best bet, but I don't know what the best value ones out there right now are.

    steam_sig.png
  • minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    Peen wrote:
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

    Have you considered something like a Boxee? It will handle most of the streaming you're looking for, and will be under $200.

    if you're gonna try to walk on water make sure you wear your comfortable shoes
  • 21stCentury21stCentury Call me Pixel, or Pix for short! [They/Them]Registered User regular
  • GriswoldGriswold that's rough, buddyRegistered User regular
    @21stCentury

    That particular 6950 has a massive-ass cooler (xkcd: massive ass-cooler) that may not fit in your case. You may be better off with this guy

    FFXIV: Brick Shizzhouse - Zalera (Crystal)
    Path of Exile: snowcrash7
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  • 21stCentury21stCentury Call me Pixel, or Pix for short! [They/Them]Registered User regular
    Oh, I see. thanks again for the input, Griswold.

  • GriswoldGriswold that's rough, buddyRegistered User regular
    Oh, I see. thanks again for the input, Griswold.

    No problem. Also, d'oh, the first Sapphire you had linked was a 2GB card, and both the Gigabyte you linked and the XFX I linked are 1GB.

    FFXIV: Brick Shizzhouse - Zalera (Crystal)
    Path of Exile: snowcrash7
    MTG Arena: Snow_Crash#34179
    Battle.net: Snowcrash#1873
  • 21stCentury21stCentury Call me Pixel, or Pix for short! [They/Them]Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    Griswold wrote:
    Oh, I see. thanks again for the input, Griswold.

    No problem. Also, d'oh, the first Sapphire you had linked was a 2GB card, and both the Gigabyte you linked and the XFX I linked are 1GB.

    Oh, I see, I missed that detail as well. What does that difference entail, exactly?

    What about these two? They're both 2GB cards, same number (What's then number called, the 6950? Model number?). Any comment on those?

    21stCentury on
  • GriswoldGriswold that's rough, buddyRegistered User regular
    edited October 2011
    Griswold wrote:
    Oh, I see. thanks again for the input, Griswold.

    No problem. Also, d'oh, the first Sapphire you had linked was a 2GB card, and both the Gigabyte you linked and the XFX I linked are 1GB.

    Oh, I see, I missed that detail as well. What does that difference entail, exactly?

    If you're planning on a single monitor, then nothing (except ~$30 on average between the 1GB and 2GB versions of cards). Single monitors can't really take advantage of that second gig of GPU memory. For reference: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-6950-1gb-benchmark,3041-15.html

    That said, here's a 1GB Sapphire 6950 in-stock for $240.

    Griswold on
    FFXIV: Brick Shizzhouse - Zalera (Crystal)
    Path of Exile: snowcrash7
    MTG Arena: Snow_Crash#34179
    Battle.net: Snowcrash#1873
  • 21stCentury21stCentury Call me Pixel, or Pix for short! [They/Them]Registered User regular
    Griswold wrote:
    Griswold wrote:
    Oh, I see. thanks again for the input, Griswold.

    No problem. Also, d'oh, the first Sapphire you had linked was a 2GB card, and both the Gigabyte you linked and the XFX I linked are 1GB.

    Oh, I see, I missed that detail as well. What does that difference entail, exactly?

    If you're planning on a single monitor, then nothing (except ~$30 on average between the 1GB and 2GB versions of cards). Single monitors can't really take advantage of that second gig of GPU memory. For reference: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-6950-1gb-benchmark,3041-15.html

    That said, here's a 1GB Sapphire 6950 in-stock for $240.

    Oh, marvelous, that sounds like what I need, then. Thank you, Griswold.

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    Peen wrote:
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

    Have you considered something like a Boxee? It will handle most of the streaming you're looking for, and will be under $200.

    Like minor incident said, boxee (and google tv), both offer a cheap solution for internet tv. As a side note, roku and apple tv are similar devices, but they lack the "browser" ability. Basically what you should remember if you go this route is that all of these platforms are subject to licensing issues. For roku and apple tv, that means that you can't access all internet content, as there's no browser, you just get access to your own files and internet streaming sites that have specifically made a deal with roku/apple tv. With google tv/boxee you get the same access to your own files, licensed streaming sites, and access to a browser. However, even though it should theoretically be the same as using a browser on windows or mac, you can still have problems with sites not allowing you to stream their content through boxee/google tv. Here's a nice article about the differences between them; the article also contains a link to information about the site blocking.

    I haven't had any first hand experience with these devices, but my impression is that when it works it will be a much easier, much cheaper solution for accessing internet streaming sites. With the caveat that you will almost certainly find some sites that just won't work with your device, no matter what you do.

    If you build your own computer, it will be much more difficult to get it running nicely, but as always you will be able to do more. In your case since you seem to want the bare minimum it might not be worth the extra expense. I went the HTPC route and I like it because I can use it as for a dvr, downloading torrents, streaming internet tv, bluray/dvd player, and as a media server for my laptops. The cheapest you could build a HTPC that could do 1080p would probably be around $400 - $500. Alot is going to depend on what you need/want it to do. A few questions:

    Do you need windows? ($30-$100) depending on whether you're a student or not
    Is it strictly for tv watching or would you be doing some gaming? (extra $50-$100 for cpu, extra $100-$200 for dedicated gpu)
    Do you want DVR ability with local channels? ($70-$100)
    Do you want DVR ability with premium cable channels? ($250-$300)
    Do you have a lot of media files that you want to put on this computer? (extra $50 for larger hdd)

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    I decided to put off building a new pc for a few more weeks, and wait for another paycheck because prices went up by $30-40 on a few of the parts I had picked out over the weekend.

    I had initially the Crucial M4 128GB SSD over the OCZ or other Sandforce based SSD's for reliability. However, the Crucial now seems to fluctuate daily between $15-60 more than the SandForce drives. Since the new SandForce firmware has been released does that mean the stability issues are no longer a problem or is it too soon to tell? Are the SandForce drives doing to be noticeably faster than the M4, or is it a matter of a few seconds or less on reads/writes?

    Cormac on
    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    Peen wrote:
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

    Have you considered something like a Boxee? It will handle most of the streaming you're looking for, and will be under $200.

    Can the Boxee browser reliably access stuff from network websites (e.g. CBS.com etc)? Last time I took a look at it (which was over a year ago) it couldn't.

    The benefit of a Windows box is that you won't run into BS where your box is blocked because it's running the wrong OS.

    steam_sig.png
  • redraptorredraptor Registered User regular
    So I'm fleshing out my build today, I don't know anything really, but I'd like this shit to play Starcraft all nice, and allow for live streaming.

    First rough pass.

    Processor: i5-2400 - $189.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115074
    Graphics Card: Asus GTX 460 - $134.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121391
    Memory: GSkill Ripjaw 2x4GB - $49.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231428
    Case: Raidmax Smilodon - $49.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811156063
    Sound Card: Creative Sound Blaster - $24.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16829102003#
    HD: Seagate Barracuda - $54.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148699
    Mobo: BIOSTAR H61MU3 LGA 1155 Intel H61 - $57.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138311
    PSU: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500W - $34.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341016

    How's it sound?

    Anywhere I can get good trades for performance/price. I'm not really locked into the budget area. I'm told Starcraft prizes processor speed over Graphics so if I had to bump there I'd probably go up to the 2500K if its worth it.

    on't really know what I'm doing with the MOBO or if it is worth it, to get more RAM slots.

    Sound card is a bit of a random choice, newegg doesn't have that many available. Am I missing their importance?

    My last CPU had a bunch of annoying overheating problems, so I'm not sure if a standalone cooler would be a good choice? The case I'm getting looks pretty neat, so I'm not where you should cut the line on that front.

  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    redraptor wrote:
    So I'm fleshing out my build today, I don't know anything really, but I'd like this shit to play Starcraft all nice, and allow for live streaming.

    First rough pass.

    Processor: i5-2400 - $189.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115074
    Graphics Card: Asus GTX 460 - $134.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121391
    Memory: GSkill Ripjaw 2x4GB - $49.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231428
    Case: Raidmax Smilodon - $49.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811156063
    Sound Card: Creative Sound Blaster - $24.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16829102003#
    HD: Seagate Barracuda - $54.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148699
    Mobo: BIOSTAR H61MU3 LGA 1155 Intel H61 - $57.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138311
    PSU: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500W - $34.99 (pro rebate)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341016

    How's it sound?

    Anywhere I can get good trades for performance/price. I'm not really locked into the budget area. I'm told Starcraft prizes processor speed over Graphics so if I had to bump there I'd probably go up to the 2500K if its worth it.

    on't really know what I'm doing with the MOBO or if it is worth it, to get more RAM slots.

    Sound card is a bit of a random choice, newegg doesn't have that many available. Am I missing their importance?

    My last CPU had a bunch of annoying overheating problems, so I'm not sure if a standalone cooler would be a good choice? The case I'm getting looks pretty neat, so I'm not where you should cut the line on that front.

    Run. Run from the Biostar motherboard. Run from every Biostar product. Run.

    Sound cards arent really necessary unless you need a feature the motherboard doesnt provide or do something where sound quality is important (or youre just an audiophile).

    If you dont mind buying piecemeal, I got the Samsung Spinpoint 1TB for about the same price as that Seagate (but I bought it on Amazon).

    If you like the case go for it, but be warned that it has like zero cable management. The Haf 912 is about the same price and while its cable management isnt fantastic, it is present and is definitely serviceable.

    I'll let someone else comment on the power supply as I can never remember which are the ones to look out for and I feel like the OCZ ModXStream is one of the ones to pass on.

  • redraptorredraptor Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    I guess I'm a bit clueless on MOBO. Anything <$100 I should look for specifically? I could go a bit higher I just don't know what I'm looking for.

    Are there any standalone cable management solutions?

    Better?
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128520

    redraptor on
  • Day of the BearDay of the Bear The Qun demandsRegistered User regular
    Generally speaking, asus gigabyte and asrock all put out fairly solid boards.

    Are you interested in dual gpu down the line?
    Overclocking? (and if you are interested in OCing you'll need to step up to the 2500k)

    m6eoUgQ.jpg
  • ParielPariel Registered User regular
    As Day of the Bear said, ASUS, Gigabyte, or ASRock are good choices.

    If you're looking for a good deal, you might look at the open-box motherboards. I got my ASRock P67 PRO3 for $55 that way and I'm very happy with it.

  • minor incidentminor incident expert in a dying field njRegistered User regular
    tsmvengy wrote:
    Peen wrote:
    Hey guys, I'm thinking about putting together a tiny media PC for my living room. I'd like to hook it up to my tv (a 32 inch Vizio LCD) to use the Internet and stream tv from network websites that don't offer their shows through Hulu or Netflix or other aggregators.

    My main interests are to build cheap and to have a reasonably small form-factor to fit in my entertainment center. It doesn't need to have any kind of drives for physical media or anything. Help?

    Have you considered something like a Boxee? It will handle most of the streaming you're looking for, and will be under $200.

    Can the Boxee browser reliably access stuff from network websites (e.g. CBS.com etc)? Last time I took a look at it (which was over a year ago) it couldn't.

    The benefit of a Windows box is that you won't run into BS where your box is blocked because it's running the wrong OS.

    I've only occasionally had it have issues. I've used it with CBS, ABC, and I'm sure a few others. Sometimes something doesn't click right and you have to back out of the browser and go back in, but I'd say 85% of the time it's flawless, and the issues it has are minor and quickly fixed. The last couple major software updates have improved in this area dramatically.

    if you're gonna try to walk on water make sure you wear your comfortable shoes
  • Day of the BearDay of the Bear The Qun demandsRegistered User regular
    Pariel wrote:
    As Day of the Bear said, ASUS, Gigabyte, or ASRock are good choices.

    If you're looking for a good deal, you might look at the open-box motherboards. I got my ASRock P67 PRO3 for $55 that way and I'm very happy with it.

    Also depending on your needs micro atx boards tend to be cheaper than full size, if you can live with a more compact layout with slightly fewer connectors/slots over all

    m6eoUgQ.jpg
  • redraptorredraptor Registered User regular
    Generally speaking, asus gigabyte and asrock all put out fairly solid boards.

    Are you interested in dual gpu down the line?
    Overclocking? (and if you are interested in OCing you'll need to step up to the 2500k)

    Its a machine for streaming, programming, and SC2. So I'm guessing I'll really prize processor strength over GPU. If I overclock I'm guessing I should look for a stand-alone cooler? Is it fair to trim down the GPU any further, what is a worthwhile trade below that price point?
    Pariel wrote:
    As Day of the Bear said, ASUS, Gigabyte, or ASRock are good choices.

    If you're looking for a good deal, you might look at the open-box motherboards. I got my ASRock P67 PRO3 for $55 that way and I'm very happy with it.

    Also depending on your needs micro atx boards tend to be cheaper than full size, if you can live with a more compact layout with slightly fewer connectors/slots over all

    My needs aren't that much. Is there any more trouble in setting up a smaller board?

  • RakaiRakai Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    Ok, here's what I'm looking to put together for someone for a non-gaming computer (doesn't play games at all):

    Processor: Intel Core i5-2300
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115076
    Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z68M-D2H LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s Micro ATX Intel Motherboard
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128523
    Case:SILVERSTONE Black Aluminum / 0.8mm SECC Grandia Series GD05B micro-ATX
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811163166
    PSU: Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V2.2 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371016
    Memory: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231314
    BD/DVD-Drive: LG Black 12X BD-R
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136226
    HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST3500413AS 500GB 7200 RPM
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148701

    I'm operating under specific case dimensions, so there's not much choice there (and I'll get it from Amazon since they have free shipping). He won't play any games on it so I'm avoiding the video card (although the case and MB do have room for one to be added if it's ever needed).

    Rakai on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]XBL: Rakayn | PS3: Rakayn | Steam ID
  • ParielPariel Registered User regular
    If you're not playing games, what exactly are you planning on using it for? That would help.

    Also, I wouldn't go with a Seagate hard drive. Take a look at the Samsung F3. The Antec Neo Eco is similar in price to the BP550 but essentially set up for newer systems with more power on the 12V rail. Doesn't matter since you don't have discrete graphics, but it's a more versatile supply if you decide to keep using it in the future.

  • PeenPeen Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote:
    A few questions:

    Do you need windows? ($30-$100) depending on whether you're a student or not
    Is it strictly for tv watching or would you be doing some gaming? (extra $50-$100 for cpu, extra $100-$200 for dedicated gpu)
    Do you want DVR ability with local channels? ($70-$100)
    Do you want DVR ability with premium cable channels? ($250-$300)
    Do you have a lot of media files that you want to put on this computer? (extra $50 for larger hdd)

    I've already got a PS3 with Playon running as a media server to it from my computer, so I can reliably stream most everything you can get that way. I'd like the flexibility of an actual computer hooked to my tv, the PS3's browser is shit. And frankly a nettop is probably my best solution, I just didn't know if they're cheaply made and I wanted to explore getting better hardware by building it myself (if it wouldn't cost way more). So to answer your questions:

    1.No, got a copy.
    2. No gaming.
    3. No DVR.
    4. No media files, I can steam stuff across from my desktop or use a flash drive to move things over if need be. Small hard drive is fine.

  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    HWMonitor tells me my CPUTIN is running at 80C

    Cores are all around 30C

    What is CPUTIN? This seems too high a temp, is it? What are possible fixes to this?

    Since this was my first build there is a good chance I used too much thermal paste, should I pull it apart and refix the Hyper212+?

    Thanks

  • BurtletoyBurtletoy Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    And now, suddenly the CPUTIN is holding at 5C which I believe is WAY cooler than the room I am sitting in.

    Hmmmm

    Burtletoy on
  • RakaiRakai Registered User regular
    Pariel wrote:
    If you're not playing games, what exactly are you planning on using it for? That would help.

    Also, I wouldn't go with a Seagate hard drive. Take a look at the Samsung F3. The Antec Neo Eco is similar in price to the BP550 but essentially set up for newer systems with more power on the 12V rail. Doesn't matter since you don't have discrete graphics, but it's a more versatile supply if you decide to keep using it in the future.

    Mainly it's used for work and possibly media in future, neither of which will stress the system. However he doesn't upgrade his computer very often (this is replacing a 10 year old computer) so I want it to be able to handle anything in the future. For the power supply, I want a modular design because I'm working with a smaller case, so cutting back on on cables would be a plus.

    Changed HDD to this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152305

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]XBL: Rakayn | PS3: Rakayn | Steam ID
  • ParielPariel Registered User regular
    Yeah, that's the hard drive.

    I guess if you want to future proof it for a long time, an i5-2300 might be worth it, but honestly I'd save the money and go with the i3-2100. It's not like office products or movies are going to become more difficult to run in the future. If you want a modular PSU, sticking with the BP550 won't hurt.

  • emp123emp123 Registered User regular
    Burtletoy wrote:
    And now, suddenly the CPUTIN is holding at 5C which I believe is WAY cooler than the room I am sitting in.

    Hmmmm

    Check RealTemp.

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    Peen wrote:
    I've already got a PS3 with Playon running as a media server to it from my computer, so I can reliably stream most everything you can get that way. I'd like the flexibility of an actual computer hooked to my tv, the PS3's browser is shit. And frankly a nettop is probably my best solution, I just didn't know if they're cheaply made and I wanted to explore getting better hardware by building it myself (if it wouldn't cost way more). So to answer your questions:

    1.No, got a copy.
    2. No gaming.
    3. No DVR.
    4. No media files, I can steam stuff across from my desktop or use a flash drive to move things over if need be. Small hard drive is fine.

    Well for an only internet streaming computer you can probably go pretty cheap. In fact any new computer you could get will probaby be good enough to stream internet tv.

    For general longevity purposes I'd probably still suggest an i3 2100, or something similar. It gives you enough cpu to do most things for the forseable future, and the integrated video is powerful enough to give you 1080p for your hdtv.

    Then you can pick up pretty much the cheapest motherboard you can find that uses the 1155 socket. The only thing to check for would be an hdmi connection. Other than that it's all preferences for what you want to add, but nothing will be necessary for tv playing. Maybe something like the Asrock H61M.

    Low wattage psu like the Antec Earthwatts 380. You could bump this up if you think you might want better graphics in the future.

    any HTPC case you want. Lianli and Silverstone tend to be higher quality, with a slightly higher price. I went with the Silverstone ML30b because it was the nicest one short enough to fit in my entertainment center.

    Cheap hdd and 4-8gb of whatever memory fits you fancy and you should be set. Around $350-$400.

    You can probably go cheaper with less future-proofing, but I'm not really sure what the good deals would be, and it's going to be deminishing returns pretty quickly.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • AlectharAlecthar Alan Shore We're not territorial about that sort of thing, are we?Registered User regular
    edited October 2011
    Llano APU's are also a really good option for basic HTPC use. They're more powerful, graphics-wise, though less so CPU-wise.

    Obviously, an SSD is pretty expensive, but even a pretty basic 60ish GB SATA II model would provide enough room for the OS, along with significant improvements in boot time and general system responsiveness. As long as you aren't storing any data locally, the lack of storage space is a non-issue.

    If you really want to go with a net-top like system, you should look at a case like this, with a low power solution like Atom or Brazos.

    Alecthar on
  • schattenjaegerschattenjaeger Registered User regular
    The hour is upon me! My new computer parts (chosen with assistance from this thread's previous iteration, thanks) arrive tomorrow. I'm replacing my 4-5 year old CPU/mobo/videocard/case, and keeping my hard drive, which is currently running a retail full install of Windows 7 64-bit.

    I think I'm squared away on assembling this thing, but I'm not really sure what's going to happen once I hit power. My original understanding was that if you replace the mobo you have to reinstall the OS. Fair enough, however I've heard that I "might not have to." I'm not nearly smart enough to make use of that information; what determines whether or not I need to reinstall? Also, are there be activation issues that I should look out for?

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