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The Adventures of Tintin.

MatthewMatthew Registered User regular
edited December 2011 in Graphic Violence
I just got back from seeing this movie, and I have to say that, while it won't be winning any oscars int he future, it was a damn entertaining movie. It even got me to purchase a collection of Herge's old comics. The comics are good and enteretaining, and contain some of the stuff you'd expect from a comic made in this time-period, for this purpose (The downside to the old Tintin stories is that the very early ones where made as defeses of Colonialism, and featured somewhat racist portrayos of people fom other countries, thoug this died down after the first two volumes). But Tintin himself is a good "boy hero" character, and his supporting cast is very entertaining to watch, especially Captain Haddock (a drunk sea captain with a legendary past), and Snowy (Tintin's very intelligent and supportive dog).

From Wikipeda

"The Adventures of Tintin (Les Aventures de Tintin) is a series of classic comic books created by Belgian artist Georges Remi (1907–1983), who wrote under the pen name of Hergé. The series is one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century, with translations published in more than 50 languages and more than 200 million copies of the books sold to date.[1]

The series first appeared in French in Le Petit Vingtième, a children's supplement to the Belgian newspaper Le XXe Siècle on 10 January 1929. The success of the series saw the serialised strips published in Belgium's leading newspaper Le Soir, collected into a series of twenty-four albums, spun into a successful Tintin magazine, and adapted for film, radio, television and theatre.

Set during a largely realistic 20th century, the hero of the series is Tintin, a young Belgian reporter. He is aided in his adventures by his faithful fox terrier dog Snowy (Milou in French). Later, popular additions to the cast included the brash and cynical Captain Haddock, the highly intelligent but hearing-impaired Professor Calculus (Professeur Tournesol) and other supporting characters such as the incompetent detectives Thomson and Thompson (Dupont et Dupond). Hergé himself features in several of the comics as a background character, as do his assistants in some instances.

The comic strip series has long been admired for its clean, expressive drawings in Hergé's signature ligne claire style.[2][3][4][5] Its engaging,[6] well-researched[6][7][8] plots straddle a variety of genres: swashbuckling adventures with elements of fantasy, mysteries, political thrillers, and science fiction. The stories within the Tintin series always feature slapstick humour, offset in later albums by dashes of sophisticated satire and political/cultural commentary"

The only thing the fim lacked is the presence of professor Calculus, but i'm sure the sequel will remedy that.
This thread is to talk about the character, either the film or the classic comic series.

Matthew on

Posts

  • VermisVermis Registered User regular
    I grew up on Tintin books from the local library, years before I could get my hands on some American comics. There are some... unfortunate moments that don't leave a good taste in the mouth, as you mention, but I don't think they should spoil the overall quality. (and I never knew some of them existed, until years later. I read more of the post-Haddock books) One of my big disappointments on a trip to Brussels was that I couldn't spend too much time in the Musée Hergé. I was with a bunch of nerds, but they weren't European-comics-nerds...

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  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    I also grew up with these books, having been introduced to them through the all-things-considered-pretty-good early 90's animated adaption series when it had a relatively brief run on Nickelodeon. Hearing about the movie revived my interest in them, and this year as a Christmas gift my dad got me the Collector's Gift Set, which I have been enjoying greatly, although I had forgotten (or simply never realized) how crazy some of the things that happen in them are.

    I am planning on seeing the movie later this week and since by all accounts the people responsible for it are huge fans of the source material, I have high hopes they will do it justice, though I have been sort of dreading the US release of the film for months simply because I don't think it will get the attention it deserves from an American public who largely have no idea who Tintin is. (A former boss of mine, upon hearing the title of the movie this past summer, seriously thought it was about Rin Tin Tin the dog. Yes, the canine star of a franchise which had its last real media property released circa 1960 apparently has more currency in the American popular consciousness than Herge's Tintin does.)

    Gaslight on
    bowen wrote: »
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  • Linespider5Linespider5 Walking Jared Leto Repellant Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    Gaslight wrote:
    A former boss of mine, upon hearing the title of the movie this past summer, seriously thought it was about Rin Tin Tin the dog. Yes, the canine star of a franchise which had its last real media property released circa 1960 apparently has more currency in the American popular consciousness than Herge's Tintin does.

    Welcome to the concept of ignorance. You find in time that many people have not lived your life or even had a chance to know something exists that was never sold or exported in the region and time they grew up in.

    I remember watching Tin Tin as an animated show on Nickelodeon a long time ago. It was good, but I seem to recall the episodes had a peculiar quality of never resolving-every bit of plot always rolled into something else, and there wasn't even a moment of victory or celebration to mark any accomplishments. It felt kinda odd, more like needing to constantly reassess what kind of adventure it really was, rather than moving from adventure to adventure.

    Linespider5 on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2011
    We're big fans of Tintin in this house and it's mostly the art that's gotten under my skin.

    Herge is the inventor of the Ligne Claire and has had a gigantic influence on comics. The movie does a good job translating this style to 3D and stays true to the vibrant and comicky world that Herge has created in his time. To give the uninformed some idea of what I'm talking about:

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    More in the spoiler:
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    Steven Spielberg has translated that style to this:


    Fun fact: after Spielberg finished Indiana Jones he got in touch with Herge, who asked him if he was inspired by Tintin, Spielberg admitted he had never heard of Tintin and set out to rectify this. He read the comics, fell in love with them and wanted to make a movie out of them. By the time he tried to reach Herge again, the artist had died. Spielberg has done quite a few other movies in the meantime, but his plans to make Tintin films never faded. After he had seen the fantastic work on Avatar he knew for certain he could do justice to Herge's art.

    I'm really looking forward to new Tintin movies now, the current one did well in Europe and has seen successes in India and other countries as well. I'm curious to read what you Americans think of it.

    Aldo on
    Elendil wrote: »
    said Aldo hazily, before clop-clop-clopping out of the room
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger PennsylvaniaRegistered User regular
    I remember watching the movies on Nick way back in the 90s I guess. I still haven't read any of the comics, but I have read Brandon Graham's comics, and Tintin was a big influence on him. I planning on seeing this this weekend, if it is playing nearby. Ah, living in the middle of nowhere...

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    Gaslight wrote:
    A former boss of mine, upon hearing the title of the movie this past summer, seriously thought it was about Rin Tin Tin the dog. Yes, the canine star of a franchise which had its last real media property released circa 1960 apparently has more currency in the American popular consciousness than Herge's Tintin does.

    Welcome to the concept of ignorance. You find in time that many people have not lived your life or even had a chance to know something exists that was never sold or exported in the region and time they grew up in.

    You seem to have gotten the impression I was passing judgment on my former boss' ignorance of Tintin. I was not. I was merely relating this as an example of just how little awareness of the character there is in the United States.

    bowen wrote: »
    The bacteria in your poop exist everywhere.
  • grim123grim123 Registered User regular
    I just got the gift set too. Opened the first book and was surprized to see Snowy talk. I didnt remember that at all

    Aww nutsack.
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  • GospreyGosprey Registered User
    edited January 2012
    I quite liked Tintin, or more accurately his supporting cast (does anyone not like Thomson and Thompson?), but he was always in competition to Asterix and Obelix, which was a tough and frequently lost battle.

    Not sure yet if I'll see the film; from the trailer it seems as thought the character's voices are seriously carrying the vision, which doesn't seem right for a big-stakes animation. Almost like a radio play.

    Gosprey on
  • HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    I just saw the movie, and it was brilliant.

    I'm very interested in working backwards into this, perhaps watching the animated show next and then trying a volume or two.

  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    Aldo wrote:
    Fun fact: after Spielberg finished Indiana Jones he got in touch with Herge, who asked him if he was inspired by Tintin, Spielberg admitted he had never heard of Tintin and set out to rectify this.
    Is that accurate? It'd seem very strange to me that Spielberg would contact Herge, a writer famous pretty much only for Tintin, if he had never heard of the comics beforehand.

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    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo A lemon squeezed in the salty fist of Poseidon Registered User regular
    edited January 2012
    I do love Tintin. I've been trying to get through the comics in French. It has taught me much about how to be an effective racist.
    Thirith wrote:
    Aldo wrote:
    Fun fact: after Spielberg finished Indiana Jones he got in touch with Herge, who asked him if he was inspired by Tintin, Spielberg admitted he had never heard of Tintin and set out to rectify this.
    Is that accurate? It'd seem very strange to me that Spielberg would contact Herge, a writer famous pretty much only for Tintin, if he had never heard of the comics beforehand.

    I think you're reading it backwards. How would Spielberg contact Herge (who he hadn't heard of) and then pose himself a question about whether he'd used a comic he'd not heard of as inspiration. If this isn't an urban myth, then it had to be Herge who got in touch with Spielberg.

    Mojo_Jojo on
    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    I'm sorry I did not know that the saying "get in touch with" only worked in one direction. I - of course - meant to say that Hergé called Spielberg.

    And Hergé is absolutely famous for Tintin, he's the inventor of the Clear Line! Anyone even vaguely into comics should know of him and his work.

    Elendil wrote: »
    said Aldo hazily, before clop-clop-clopping out of the room
  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    Forgot about this thread, but wanted to say I did end up seeing the movie on New Year's Eve and it was quite entertaining and a very respectable interpretation of the source material. They basically won me over just with the opening credits sequence and the "cameo" of Hergé at the very beginning. The frames newspapers and their headlines in Tintin's apartment were a nice touch too.

    Unsurprisingly, it was pretty heavily embellished from the original books...I'd say it was about 40% The Secret of the Unicorn, 20% The Crab With the Golden Claws, and 40% original material they just made up. I think the people I saw it with who had no knowledge of the source material actually enjoyed it more because I couldn't help but be a little sad that the stories which I loved so much as a kid weren't considered sufficient to entertain a movie audience by themselves, even though the new stuff was all nicely done and generally much in keeping with the spirit of the original material (but I will say that they almost lost me when Captain Haddock fuels the plane with his whisky breath).

    bowen wrote: »
    The bacteria in your poop exist everywhere.
  • I've read all of the books and they were a huge influence. I haven't seen Tin Tin yet, but I want to once I get a free moment.

  • skyblue676skyblue676 Registered User
    Yea that was really great movie and I love the cartoon and the book of it. He was my cartoon hero at my childhood.

  • GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    I still love the dubbed version of the cartoons. Turn down the volume and don't watch at work. Lots of cussing in this lot.



  • ShadeyShadey Registered User
    I always loved Tin Tin. Though I vaguely remember the series when during my youth, when they announced the making of the films I was very excited. Haven't had a chance to see them yet, but I definitely plan to fix that sometime this week.

  • sotsogsotsog Registered User
    I loved the environment in the movie and how the animators kept to cartoonish movements and activities for the background characters. A good example is the scene where Tintin tries not to wake a room full of sailors while they roll around due to the rocking boat. Only thing that took getting used to was the facial animations. Yes the faces look amazing but they seem to lifelike to be apart of the world of Tintin. Exaggerated expressions I feel could have added allot more to the movie. In fact the effects were so nice the entire movie I was constantly reminded of the live action Popeye movie with Robin Williams.

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