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What are you making? [Artsy farts and craftsy asses]

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    In class, we're going to be doing more casting soon, and I've decided that I'm going to attempt a (smaller than regular) cast copper d20, complete with attempts at inlaid silver numbering and maybe some patina. Main goal is decorative only, but if it's usable then that's cool too.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    In the meantime, I'm bored at work and in the mood to experiment. Took two strands of 28 gauge brass wire and one of 24 gauge copper, doubled them over a bar and wound them into a tight enough cord. Did that two more times.

    Then I braided the three cords, as best as I could manage.

    mbagjpnd28gz.jpg

    No idea what I'll do with it, but I'll figure something out. I'm also open to suggestions.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    DidgeridooDidgeridoo Flighty Dame Registered User regular
    In failed projects news, I tried to make a little rolling wooden dog toy which could wag his tail!

    ...I had to Old Yeller the little guy when I failed to accurately maintain a 90 degree angle during drilling. Wheel holes ended up terribly misaligned and I had some pretty significant tearout.

    Oh well! On to the next thing. Learned a lot in trying to craft the toy, hopefully next time will be a bit better.

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    Yeah, it sucks when a project goes bust. I had one recently where I was trying to make brass triforce earrings, but the orientation of the drilled holes made them bunch up too much.

    Now I'm working on plans for a slightly smaller "triforce pyramid" made up of four smaller, soldered brass pyramids. Tentative project name is "quad force"

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    Didgeridoo wrote: »
    In failed projects news, I tried to make a little rolling wooden dog toy which could wag his tail!

    ...I had to Old Yeller the little guy when I failed to accurately maintain a 90 degree angle during drilling. Wheel holes ended up terribly misaligned and I had some pretty significant tearout.

    Oh well! On to the next thing. Learned a lot in trying to craft the toy, hopefully next time will be a bit better.

    Have you tried a drill guide? There's a few variants on it, but it's a nice way to get a 90 degree hole.

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    Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    il_570xN.832198346_7vl4.jpg

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    Why does this have to be 60 dollars

    I want to make this shit!!

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    DidgeridooDidgeridoo Flighty Dame Registered User regular
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    Didgeridoo wrote: »
    In failed projects news, I tried to make a little rolling wooden dog toy which could wag his tail!

    ...I had to Old Yeller the little guy when I failed to accurately maintain a 90 degree angle during drilling. Wheel holes ended up terribly misaligned and I had some pretty significant tearout.

    Oh well! On to the next thing. Learned a lot in trying to craft the toy, hopefully next time will be a bit better.

    Have you tried a drill guide? There's a few variants on it, but it's a nice way to get a 90 degree hole.

    Oooh, that's a good idea! I didn't want to drop $$$ Texas on a drill press, but also kind of suck at maintaining the correct angle by hand. This could be a good compromise...

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    Bluedude152Bluedude152 Registered User regular
    Maybe...I should try making my own owls

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    p0a2ody6sqnt.jpg
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    CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    I successfully drilled a couple of holes in a grapewood branch (and avoided drilling any in myself)!

    ...as someone who has never used a handheld drill, nor attempted any kind of woodworking beyond assembling furniture from Target, this feels like an accomplishment :P

    Also, who knew a 3/16 inch hole could produce so much sawdust?

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    tapeslingertapeslinger Space Unicorn Slush Ranger Social Justice Rebel ScumRegistered User regular
    Things I have crafted recently in no particular order other than "where they are in my instagram feed:"


    Rerooting an old fashion doll to make star wars fanart


    Teeny tiny knitting for dolls


    More work on the Hot Toys ttm22 figure, now featuring actual clothes and hair and such


    Made half-size sock needles out of full length sock needles for more fun with knitting miniature scale

    I swear I have done some non doll sized work lately too
    But eh

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    So, for the casting project, we've been encouraged to make a series piece, and we've been instructed that the process is mainly for being able to mass produce complicated pieces (which is true) that would be a pain to reproduce manually. Which led me to ponder on what might be the biggest pain in the butt at my skill level/equipment availability. This is my current answer (dime for scale):

    1jq0gdyzsih1.jpg

    Still going to do the d20 mentioned before, but I thought I'd share stuff that's also happening.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    Question for any leathercrafters here: my wife frequently makes things that require a ton of hammering to put stitch-holes in (see
    But we have a small house and hardwood floors. It's clearly audible from outside the house, and while I've acclimated to it (she's got a very steady rhythm), it does mean she's hesitant to do much work later at night when neighbors might be asleep.

    I've been wanting to get her a bench block, but I don't know much about them. When I google it, there are a lot of results for jewelry or metalcraft, and it seems like maybe you get a steel block and put it on top of a rubber one? But surely with leatherworking you wouldn't hammer your tools onto a metal surface?

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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    A block of hardwood on top of a thick sheet of nice soft rubber should help dampen the thump a bit. You'll still have the ping noise of the hammer striking the punch, though.

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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    edited February 2016
    Is there a reason she doesn't use a leather punch? It looks like a set of pliers with a rotating punch bit on one side. I think that would be very preferable to hammering. Requires a bit of forearm strength though.

    knitdan on
    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Is there a reason she doesn't use a leather punch? It looks like a set of pliers with a rotating punch bit on one side. I think that would be very preferable to hammering. Requires a bit of forearm strength though.

    3230.JPG

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    DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    She has one of those. It's good for larger holes, but for things that need to be stitched, she uses these. I mean, one pair of horns might have 320 stitch holes. Far easier to use a stitching chisel. Also helps ensure they line up straight.

    I'll look into a hardwood block. It's not the hammer ping so much as the fact that the sound gets transferred into the floor and seems to be amplified by by the relatively empty garage.

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    A phone book or something similar under the block should help dampen the thump. It's what my teachers use in their studio for some things.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    Delzhand wrote: »
    She has one of those. It's good for larger holes, but for things that need to be stitched, she uses these. I mean, one pair of horns might have 320 stitch holes. Far easier to use a stitching chisel. Also helps ensure they line up straight.

    I'll look into a hardwood block. It's not the hammer ping so much as the fact that the sound gets transferred into the floor and seems to be amplified by by the relatively empty garage.

    You might look into acoustic panels also.

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    I've learned something new! Specifically that casting with copper is different enough from silver that the methods I've been taught aren't right for it.

    my teacher has made a few suggestions that I'm looking into now.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    tapeslingertapeslinger Space Unicorn Slush Ranger Social Justice Rebel ScumRegistered User regular
    Finished rerooting the Rey doll head, yay


    Now on to finish making her desert garb. I have a soft foam clay curing on her feet to give her custom sized shoes with some flexibility but I'll need to wrap those with fabric to get the right look, I think

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    more crafty than arty, but

    four framing struts at $6.50 a pop, plus some spray paint

    vamn4ewuotu4.jpg

    and now I have picture ledges, a bathroom shelf, and a spice rack*

    jl6bhq31prca.jpg
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    *used only for a few small light things because the builders put the tile in crooked, so I couldn't drill into the grout, and I'm not really sure the 3M sticky whatsits are really up to the job

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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    edited March 2016
    The 3M stcky whatsits work okay below about 35 degrees and 90% humidity. We've had two pictures jump off the wall on hot days.

    Edit: with the right drill bit and some masking tape, you can drill throigh the tile with a regular cordless drill and whack some screw plugs in the wall, then you'd just about be able to do chin ups off your spice rack.

    Donovan Puppyfucker on
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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I'll prepare for a collapse in summer, then. Although hopefully it won't get up to 35 in the kitchen. Who the hell knows, though.

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    tapeslingertapeslinger Space Unicorn Slush Ranger Social Justice Rebel ScumRegistered User regular
    edited March 2016
    I imagine if you keep it to small containers it should be all right; I've found the 3M command hooks hold up fine as long as you really don't push the weight threshold, but ymmv etc


    More Rey doll progress, woo:



    Oh hey another one because I lack shame

    tapeslinger on
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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    The 3M stcky whatsits work okay below about 35 degrees and 90% humidity. We've had two pictures jump off the wall on hot days.

    Edit: with the right drill bit and some masking tape, you can drill throigh the tile with a regular cordless drill and whack some screw plugs in the wall, then you'd just about be able to do chin ups off your spice rack.

    I'm renting; putting holes in the walls is ok but I'm leery about trying anything that could cause a crack.

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    pookapooka Registered User regular
    draaaaaaft.

    are you actually this lady?

    i haven't worked on anything in a bit, but an arm-knit WIP:
    1452896945255589141716_medium2.jpg

    i actually have some curtain rods hung with some of the heavier command strips -- 2 on each bracket. they've been up since at least... September? August? for the wooden rods, and sometime much earlier for the metal rod. YMMV.

    lfchwLd.jpg
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    tapeslingertapeslinger Space Unicorn Slush Ranger Social Justice Rebel ScumRegistered User regular
    pooka wrote: »
    are you actually this lady?

    i haven't worked on anything in a bit, but an arm-knit WIP:
    1452896945255589141716_medium2.jpg

    !!
    I want to be that lady!

    Also your arm knitting looks incredibly cozy and I wish to smoosh it

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    pookapooka Registered User regular
    edited March 2016
    i definitely like it, though imma have to rip back again, as that cable is all kinds of wonky due to poor improvising. i wanted to learn how to arm knit, and i really like the projects in this book for being stylish but not obnoxiously trendy. if anyone's interested, i can dig up links to other project pics, since what's the point of getting a pattern book without seeing the end product? the Amazon page does have a bunch on 'Look Inside'. unfortunately, i can't put publisher pics on ravelry bc of copyright permissions and such; i was rather put out, as i had a bunch of pattern pages queued to go!

    pooka on
    lfchwLd.jpg
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    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    The 3M sticky whatsits work okay below about 35 degrees and 90% humidity. We've had two pictures jump off the wall on hot days.

    Edit: with the right drill bit and some masking tape, you can drill through the tile with a regular cordless drill and whack some screw plugs in the wall, then you'd just about be able to do chin ups off your spice rack.

    I'm renting; putting holes in the walls is ok but I'm leery about trying anything that could cause a crack.

    A spearpoint tile bit and some masking tape will see you fine. I've hung bathroom towel rails and toilet paper roll holders using that technique - you just use a non-hammer drill and apply steady light pressure. The tape is just to prevent any little chips coming off the edge of the hole.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    We'll see, if it falls off I may consider it. Also not sure what the deal is here when I leave the apt, holes in tile feel like more of a comittmeht than holes in plasterboard. I have spearpoint drill bits, that's no issue.

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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    edited March 2016
    @Typhoid Manny
    @Caulk Bite 6

    And any other metalworkers

    I just found this show on History Channel called Forged in Fire.

    It's basically Chopped for blacksmiths.

    The first guy they sent home, they said
    I'm sorry but your blade did not make the cut

    knitdan on
    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    Typhoid MannyTyphoid Manny Registered User regular
    booooo

    that show sounds cool though. how much of it is watching dudes forge stuff and how much is Reality Show Drama(tm)?

    from each according to his ability, to each according to his need
    hitting hot metal with hammers
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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    edited March 2016
    There's very little Reality Show Drama, aside from cutting to commercial right before a reveal.

    I've seen a couple episodes now and they get 3 hours to forge a blade and then the blades get put through some tests to see how well they cut, if they hold an edge, etc. The final 2 guys get a week at their home forge to make a specified thing and then that gets tested and the best one wins.

    The contestants get time in front of the camera to talk about their process as well.

    If you've seen Chopped it's very very similar except they're working with metal not food.

    Whoops. 3 hours for initial forging, then they drop one guy. 3 more hours for finishing, then the tests.

    knitdan on
    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    DedwrekkaDedwrekka Metal Hell adjacentRegistered User regular
    So like, an hour to make the blade and two hours to heat treat it?

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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    I would probably get kicked first, at my current skill level, because that's not the skill set I'm training in.

    But that does sound like an interesting show.

    jnij103vqi2i.png
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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    Dedwrekka wrote: »
    So like, an hour to make the blade and two hours to heat treat it?

    I think so, yeah. Not everyone manages to do it.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    edited March 2016
    Does anyone know what this tool is called and where to find this type of forming pliers?

    b6mkw1ihcc2q.jpg

    Caulk Bite 6 on
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    knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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    Caulk Bite 6Caulk Bite 6 One of the multitude of Dans infesting this place Registered User regular
    Awesome, exactly what I was looking for

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    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    Hey crafty peeps I need to cut some plastic and would like your advice.

    Basically I'd like to cut my coffee grinder down to size so it can squeeze under the bench. What'll be the best way to cut it down to size?

    (here is a photo for reference)
    [img][/img]7E42D7AC-0491-4E4B-B25D-ACADA410FACF_zpsrrzn6grh.jpg

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