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I've [CHAT] you for a thousand years, a thousand years

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
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    squidbunnysquidbunny Registered User regular
    The tattoo thing can swing one way or another, but you'd probably lose a lot of people by sharpening your forearm into a hairy spike like that.

    About 5 minutes out I'm still snickering on and off at this.

    Re: tattoos they are pretty much totally dependent on the tattoo and the guy. I do personally like a tattoo someone really planned and committed to, though, and I think that'd qualify. Digging the celestial clockwork bit of it more though because it's a design anyone can appreciate aesthetically. I'd never have the courage to go for characters/properties/artists I like for fear I wouldn't like them down the road.

    header_image_sm.jpg
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    KochikensKochikens Registered User regular
    Even if you don't like the character/property/artist down the road, you can still remember that they were at one point important to you.

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    .Tripwire..Tripwire. Firman Registered User regular
    Gonna get Sailor Moon tatted on my tongue.

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    FANTOMASFANTOMAS Flan ArgentavisRegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    .Tripwire. wrote: »
    I have been toying with the idea of a huge tattoo for a while. Still need longer to ponder before making this kind of decision, but I like conceptualizing:
    tattkngwip.jpg

    Kind of feel like polling the gals I know to see how they feel about tattoos though. I don't want to inadvertantly make myself completely undesirable to a large section of the market.

    If I went through with it, I'd try to commission Scott C and another Double Fine artist who are both heroes of mine, to add a Manny Calavera and Vault Boy to my back.

    Hmmm, tattooes are very cool, but game references in tattoes are just like band names, or girlfriend names, things you can be POSITIVE you will regret sooner or later.

    bombardier on
    Yes, with a quick verbal "boom." You take a man's peko, you deny him his dab, all that is left is to rise up and tear down the walls of Jericho with a ".....not!" -TexiKen
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    KochikensKochikens Registered User regular
    Totally disagree.

    Game tattoos are awesome. I like butterflies tattoo = I like Samus tattoo

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    .Tripwire..Tripwire. Firman Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    I get the risk, but on the other hand in a couple months these will be games I've loved for over 14 years (or almost 20 years in the case of Cannon Fodder). Of course, loving the games isn't the same as permanently marking them on my sweet bod. I'm going to keep conceptualizing and do the thing where I put it away for a year (or some extended period of time) and see if I still think it's a good idea by then.

    Edit: Also I updated a bit and started on the back. Maybe I'll just end up having more fun designing it and then not go through with it -
    tattkngwip2.jpg

    .Tripwire. on
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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    Warning from friends I have with central chest tattoos: They hurt like a mofo.

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    FANTOMASFANTOMAS Flan ArgentavisRegistered User regular
    Well there are semi-permanent tattooes, they last around 4 years or so. Since a tattoo of that magnitude cant be done in one sitting, you might want to research on that, and if you feel its the right thing one year or two after getting it, you can have it traced as permanent... of course that means double the cost, but when it comes to tattoes I think money cant really be taken into consideration.

    Yes, with a quick verbal "boom." You take a man's peko, you deny him his dab, all that is left is to rise up and tear down the walls of Jericho with a ".....not!" -TexiKen
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    amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    My first tattoo was a dragon in a circle on my back left shoulder. It wasn't until after I got it that I realized it looks about 90% like the Mortal Kombat logo. (believe me, I caught shit for this for YEARS)

    I've accepted it and am kind of working up what will eventually be a half or full sleeve of various video game/geek/comic stuff because it's kind of who I am now, but there definitely was a regret period.

    are YOU on the beer list?
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    KochikensKochikens Registered User regular
    Apparently those semi-permanent Tattoos are scams and myths.

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    brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    I did the same thing with the year wait period! I still have no regrets. I've only got two, I have a Spade with a candle designed in it on the back of the bicep part of my right arm and a Club with a water drop in the same spot on the left. Both in all black ink, simple design, one is slightly more faded and I have thought about adding blue and red to them, but eh...

    Think tattoos totally depend on the person/placement/artist. One of my most favorite tattoos on a person was this old sign painter that used to come in at this print shop I worked at. He was about 60-ish, his name was Gene Mother-Fuckin' Bell. He had a hand tattoo across the top part of his right hand that said "Stroh's" which is a cheap beer in this part of America, maybe everywhere, I don't know. But it was faded and grey and it just matched the man perfectly, on anyone else it would have looked like shit.

    in any event, I love the clockwork sun! not sure about how to best integrate characters into the design, kind of a stark contrast at this point, but that could be what you are going for...

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    m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    There's something to be said about girls cuddling on your chest, only to find Moe staring at them intensely. The gears/solar system thingy works well, if I wasn't a pussy I might consider getting that.

    m3nace on
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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Tattoo's are rad. I like guys with tattoos, and guys without tattoos. It doesn't make me really think one way or another about them. The only time I'm kinda "ew" about TattooBros is when it looks like they just pasted random flash art all over their body, or it's clear they let their "buddy with a tattoo gun" go nuts. I AM JUDGING YOU BY YOUR POOR ARTISTIC CHOICES.

    But I think yours would be cool! If you're 100% on getting the game-related tattoos, go for it! There's a handful of guys I know that all got a Halo tattoo together, and now some of them kind of regret it. But as long as it's a decision that you haven't strayed from for at least a year (content and placement), I think you could be pretty happy with it. :)

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    In completely unrelated news, my roommate sent me a text message telling me she dropped her bags of cold cuts on the floor this morning, right in front of the fridge. She apparently left them there, went to work, and then texted me asking ME to put them away for her.

    Cue my "LOL R U SRIOUS!?" face.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
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    MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    I'm not crazy about tattoos. To me, tats on girls are a turn off.

    But, I love it when people have the "Random Kanji" script on their bodies. If you ask them what it means they'll say something like "Oh, it's my son's name Justin. See, this is the J-U-S-T-I-N"

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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    That sounds like a moronic flat mate. Does she ask you to flush the toilet after she drops a deuce too?

    In unrelated news, My wife finally decided to try to do something with her sewing machine. It was about this time that I remembered that she's not very dexterous and is a bit clumsy.

    I reminded her that if the needle hits a pin that it could break the needle or something else. Two minutes later she's asking me to help her pull out a pin that had been bent and was now stuck in the bloody machine.

    Once we managed to get that sorted she got to work on trying to change her jeans into skinny jeans. I think she spent more time last night pulling stiches out than she did actually sewing.

    I'm sure that she'll get better with practice. It was just a rather frustrating night for her.

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Jeans have an epic shit-ton of seaming. That doesn't really surprise me.

    Honestly, a lot of "sewing" for me has been more measuring, cutting, and seam-ripping than it has been actual sewing. Sewing is the fast part! It's also something you can only do after all the prep has been completed.

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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    Yeah, I don't think she did a whole lot of prep work and that's probably the issue.

    And what's with all of these damn textile places near my place not selling any damn patterns? Damn snobby fashion district!

    I think my wife needs to just spend some time on Skype with my mom to learn some proper sewing lessons. She might need to raid my mom's pattern collection too.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    You can probably buy patterns cheaper online. Honestly, if she really wants to take it seriously, it might be worthwhile investing in a sewing course. You can learn-by-doing to a certain extent, but sewing is definitely one of those things where you can benefit by informed instruction in a hands-on environment.

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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    tynic wrote: »
    You can probably buy patterns cheaper online. Honestly, if she really wants to take it seriously, it might be worthwhile investing in a sewing course. You can learn-by-doing to a certain extent, but sewing is definitely one of those things where you can benefit by informed instruction in a hands-on environment.

    I was thinking the same thing last night. Thing is that I'm not really sure if she's quite ready for a pattern or if she really needs some fundamental training. I'm pretty good at picking these things up but I think it's because I deal with technical things all day everyday. Like I only needed to see how to thread the machine and make a bobbin once. I've had to show her how to do the bobbin pretty much everytime she's pulled out the machine.

    I'm guessing that she just needs some proper instruction in this situation. I'm going to try to get her and my mom on Skype to do some stuff and if she needs more formal training then I guess I'll pay for a set of classes. I really don't want her to get too frustrated and never want to touch the machine again. I think she'd have a lot of fun making stuff once she got through the learning stages.

    I am a little afraid of her having a pattern collection the size of my mom's though. My mom's pattern collection rivals my comic book collection.

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    A simple book sometimes even helps, rather than having to dish out hundreds of dollars for a set of sewing classes. Has she read anything about sewing at all, or was it literally just a "fire up that sewing machine and go wild!" situation? There's also a lot of good resources online. I've heard pants are one of the hardest pieces of clothing to sew (especially something very form-fitting like skinny jeans), not to mention denim is an absolute bitch to work with.

    If you can get her to buy some scrap fabrics (fabric stores often have sections of small pieces that they wrap into bundles, sometimes for quilters) and just practice on doing some basic projects, I think that'd help a lot. Pillow cases, blankets, curtains, etc. Learning the basics of sewing, and getting some practice in will be super useful when working her way up to making clothing.

    Also, professional garments often employ the use of something called a "serger", which allows for highly complex types of stitching that are typically used on the edges of fabric and/or on seams, and can stretch. A normal sewing machine is not capable of this, so she should also be aware of that limitation. She can sew a zig-zag stitch, which can stretch some, but isn't as "contained" or as stretchy as a serger stitch. (Regardless, denim jeans don't necessarily need to be sewn with a serger, so she has that going for her, at least.) :) But little tips like that help!

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2012
    I wouldn't dive straight into garment construction if she's never touched a machine before, no. Best thing to do is to get some practise in on scrap material, eyeballing seam width, running straight stitching lines for a while, figuring out how the tensioner works, that kind of stuff. But after an hour or two you should be good to go on simple items.

    When it comes to actually making clothes, just cutting and following a pattern is pretty straightforward. The patterns will all come with full instructions for everything from laying out to what the symbols mean. (and if you want to make eg: pillows and stuff, rather than clothes, things are even easier). But there are a lot of more advanced skills that she will need in order to make stuff that looks even half-way passable and professional. Knowing how different kinds of cloth pull and stretch, how to alter a pattern to fit your body shape (nobody is off-the-rack), how to do some of the trickier technical details like rouching and ruffles - even darts aren't necessarily that intuitive - these are all things that I would heartily recommend taking classes in (and I say this as a firm advocate of teach-yourself in most areas).

    edit: ND is totally right, you can learn a lot from books. But you were talking before about her maybe making money on the side via etsy and stuff with some sewing, and I think for that you'd need a really polished look which you're only going to get with feedback from an expert. And also I forgot about overlockers! (sergers? haven't heard that one). You CAN make a nice finish to a seam without one, and that'll do you in most instances, but yeah, if you want to do this stuff for money ...

    tynic on
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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Overlockers! That's right - I'd forgotten that's the other name for 'em.

    This thread is informative

    And tynic hit the nail on the head regarding the other stuff. The tensioner caused me a lot of issues when I first started sewing (and probably would, again, if I started sewing again! It's been years since I've done machine-sewing, rather than simple projects with hand-stitching).

    [edit] For the record, also, sergers/overlockers are mainly employed when a garment has to stretch. If she's sewing fabric that doesn't have much give (because she's sewing a garment that doesn't really require it - like a jacket, or a skirt that buttons up or uses a zipper, or a vest, or whathaveyou) then that will eliminate the issue. (There are also things like sewing an elastic band into a skirt...that will eliminate the need to worry about the stitches or the fabric stretching, but it may not be a "look" she wants in that instance. IN ANY CASE, I digress. Get her some infos!)

    NightDragon on
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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    tynic wrote: »
    edit: ND is totally right, you can learn a lot from books. But you were talking before about her maybe making money on the side via etsy and stuff with some sewing, and I think for that you'd need a really polished look which you're only going to get with feedback from an expert. And also I forgot about overlockers! (sergers? haven't heard that one). You CAN make a nice finish to a seam without one, and that'll do you in most instances, but yeah, if you want to do this stuff for money ...

    While I did say that, and I would love for her to be able to do that, I didn't really mean it. She's never doing any sewing before so she just needs to learn the machine and how to actually make stuff. If you could just buy a machine and make money on Etsy then everyone would be doing it, I would guess.

    I did do some reading before and I went out and bought her a few yards of some $1/yard scrap material so that she could find out what the different settings on the machine do and try to use that stuff to make some simple things once she figured a few things out. It wasn't my idea to work with her jeans. She saw a video on youtube on how to mod jeans to be skinny jeans and decided to try it out without having a great deal of knowledge. She quickly found out that it's not as easy as youtube made it seem.

    I'm not sure but I think the machine she has can do some kind of surger type stuff. At least, that's what the guy who sold it to us said. We were probably being rather naive when we listened to that one. He may have been fibbing to get the sale. It's a Janome SUV1108.

    I really appreciate the advice from both of you. I'll definitely try to pick up a couple of books and see if she can do some Skype sessions with my mom. (My mom probably could've done some professional work sewing. You should see her sewing room.) If she wants to do some actual lessons in the city then I'll see about signing her up for something like that too. I just think it would be a shame to be living so close to the fashion district and not take advantage of all those textile, bead, and ribbons stores.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Janome is a good brand, and I'm sure there are bi-modal sewers/overlockers on the market now (my sewing machine knowledge is well out of date cause I just used to use my mum's). So it's quite likely he was telling the truth. It sounds like you guys have got a good plan in any case. (I'm really jealous, the textiles market here is woeful and expensive besides. And I don't have room for a sewing machine in any case, but I miss making my own clothes).

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    GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    Yeah, we don't have a whole lot of room for a sewing machine either. We have a dining table that folds down into a side table. She just pulls out one side of it to use as her sewing table. But we need an extension cord so she can use that table. Right now she's using our kitchen bar/island as her work space and she's complaining about how much her back hurts because of the awkward way that she's standing over the machine. If she's not using it then it's packed up and put in her closet. It's a fairly simple machine that they use to teach students in highschool and such. My mother recommended the brand before we purchased it. We just happened to find this guy selling Janome machines at The Ex and I went for it since the price was right. I think we got a pretty good deal on the machine.

    This site says that it does stretch stitches. Is that the same thing as what a serger does?

    http://www.janome.ca/machines/suv1122-1108.html

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    ProspicienceProspicience The Raven King DenvemoloradoRegistered User regular
    Sweet tats brah! No but seriously I likey. Only comment I'd have is the spiral line in the sun - I'm sure a tattoo artist would tell you this, but thin lines like that surrounded by ink tend to kinda dissipate over time.

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Grifter wrote: »
    This site says that it does stretch stitches. Is that the same thing as what a serger does?

    http://www.janome.ca/machines/suv1122-1108.html

    I think those are just zig-zag and zig-zag variants that allow for some stretch - which is fine. She can still make great things with a basic sewing machine - they just won't necessarily have as much stretch as you'd be able to get from a serger.

    Try doing a google image search for "serger stitch" machine and "stretch stitch" machine. That guy could've been telling you that this machine can do stretch stitches like a serger, in that both create stretching seams...but that would be a little misleading. Sergers usually require more than 2 threads (like 3 or 4) to complete their stitch.

    NightDragon on
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    FlayFlay Registered User regular
    I asked my mum (who's also pretty experienced) and her only advice besides what's been said above was to stick with cottons while starting out and avoid slippery fabrics or knits. Also she said to stay away from overlockers for the moment but that may just be because she's never had one.

    I tried my first sewing project a little while ago and it's hard, so good luck to your wife.

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2012
    mechanically they're fiddly and you don't need one while learning so I'd agree with your mum, all up.

    tynic on
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    brokecrackerbrokecracker Registered User regular
    hooray!!! I just got some awesome news! I am gonna be an assets illustrator for Epipheo! (they make web videos such as these, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-G3RoBHMu-o&feature=relmfu ) It is part time for now but who the fuck cares!?! Foot in the door!

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Yep - I also agree with that, Flay.

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    .Tripwire..Tripwire. Firman Registered User regular
    It kind of feels like nobody is taking my sailor moon tongue tattoo idea seriously

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    tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Sailor Jupiter dick tattoos are where it's at.

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    MolybdenumMolybdenum Registered User regular
    I thought about googling dick tattoos for maybe three seconds, and then reason prevailed

    Steam: Cilantr0
    3DS: 0447-9966-6178
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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    good job

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    NappuccinoNappuccino Surveyor of Things and Stuff Registered User regular
    haha yeah i forgot about that part
    this lengthy but funny criticism sums up my feelings

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-x1YuvUQFJ0

    wut was that black goo

    The Red Letter Media guys actually like Prometheus quite a bit. Their full lenght review of it is far more insightful than the questions which was mostly done as a joke (several of the questions have legit rational explanations)

    It's a flawed movie... but certainly not one worth the hate it gets. a C grade with an A+ in visuals

    Like to write? Want to get e-published? Give us a look-see at http://wednesdaynightwrites.com/
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    There's also the possibility you just can't really grow a bear like other guys.

    Not even BEAR vaginas can defeat me!
    cakemikz wrote: »
    And then I rub actual cake on myself.
    Loomdun wrote: »
    thats why you have chest helmets
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    earthwormadamearthwormadam ancient crust Registered User regular
    I would agree on C grade with exceptional visuals. I just prefer the original alien because it's A grade with C visuals.

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    MustangMustang Arbiter of Unpopular Opinions Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    The internet has two movie ratings: Incredibly Awesome and Absolutely Fucking Terrible.

    Mustang on
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