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YA[Programming]T :: Interview? That's an MVC thing, right?

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  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    You're confusing your technologies. JQuery and AJAX have nothing to do with REST or Rails. The fact that Rails uses JQuery as it's easily integrated client side library is inconsequential for this discussion. You can write an entire Rails RESTful app and never touch a single shred of JQuery or AJAX, it's just going to be doing a lot of server round trips.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    for those of y'all who got CS degrees: what was your highest level math? it looks like most american programs just call for calc 1, calc 2, linear algebra, and discrete math (plus the calc-based physics units). but my community college also offers vector calc and diff eq, so i figured hey even if my bsc doesn't call for it, if it'll help me/make me a more well rounded computer scientist...

    if i can take them such that it doesn't overly stress my schedule (re: over the summer or something), do you think they're worthwhile for a dude without a particular specialization or focus?

  • Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Linear Algebra is very useful for specific kinds of work. Physics engines, data analysis, signal processing, etc. It was optional at my school unless you are going for a math minor, though.

    But mostly, math makes you better at thinking abstractly and solving problems, which is always important when coding.

    Monkey Ball Warrior on
    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
  • VeganVegan Registered User regular
    But mostly, math makes you better at thinking abstractly and solving problems, which is always important when coding.

    Yeah, my community college actually lets CS majors replace math with Philosophy - Symbolic Logic.

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  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    gotcha. thanks.

    yeah, i am definitely not one of those dudes who is resentful of math's place in the curriculum. i'm even considering a math minor (assuming that i develop a particular CS interest that i think could be fed by the necessary 400 level math electives).

    i think i'll try and make room for both of those courses before i get to my big school since they'll be cheaper. then if i do decide to pursue a math minor it'd just be 3-4 upper division electives. it's definitely interesting to me. i'm just not sure (yet, since i haven't really carved out a niche of CS that resonates with me) which areas would synergize best with my interests. wait and see, i suppose.

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Organichu wrote: »
    gotcha. thanks.

    yeah, i am definitely not one of those dudes who is resentful of math's place in the curriculum. i'm even considering a math minor (assuming that i develop a particular CS interest that i think could be fed by the necessary 400 level math electives).

    i think i'll try and make room for both of those courses before i get to my big school since they'll be cheaper. then if i do decide to pursue a math minor it'd just be 3-4 upper division electives. it's definitely interesting to me. i'm just not sure (yet, since i haven't really carved out a niche of CS that resonates with me) which areas would synergize best with my interests. wait and see, i suppose.

    If you like math / do a minor you're be well ahead of most CS grads.

    OrokosPA.png
  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    i definitely like math. there are just so many 3-4 hundred level math electives at big schools. stuff for scientific computation, real analysis, complex analysis, numerical methods, history of math, graph theory, combinatorics, modern geo with rings, topology...

    i will have to wait and see exactly which hold allure for me as i get deeper into CS.

  • KambingKambing Registered User regular
    I personally went down the combinatorics track. My big regret from undergrad is not taking more advanced math classes (in particular, modern algebra).

    @TwitchTV, @Youtube: master-level zerg ladder/customs, commentary, and random miscellany.
  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    also maybe you guys could help me with this.

    most schools that have a class titled 'discrete math' just have one, right?

    for some reason my school offers two discrete math courses. the second, though, seems to me purely like an algorithms course.
    MATH 263 Discrete Mathematics II
    4-0-4
    Algorithms and algorithm efficiency; big-O, big-Ohm, big-Q and little-o notation; average and worst-case speed; sorting algorithms; graphs, adjacency and incidence matrices; paths; connectedness; bipartite graphs; isomorphism; Euler and Hamilton paths; shortest paths; Dijkstra’s algorithm; planarity; Euler’s formula; graph coloring; trees; tree traversal; prefix, infix and postfix notation; spanning trees and minimum spanning trees (Prim, Kruskal). Formal languages, finite state machines and automata may also be discussed. Only offered in spring semester and summer II session. Prerequisite: MATH 163 with a grade of “C” or better.

    (MATH 163 is discrete mathematics 1, by the way)

    it looks like a 300 or 400 level algorithm course at a major institute. why is it regarded as a math course, here? why does it have no computer science prerequisites at all? and further, why is it not even on the CS track!?

    i have sent off an email to the CS curriculum coordinator, but i'm not sure how long i'll be waiting for a response given it's the summer.

    thanks for any explanation y'all might be able to offer wrt this

  • KambingKambing Registered User regular
    Organichu wrote: »
    also maybe you guys could help me with this.

    most schools that have a class titled 'discrete math' just have one, right?

    for some reason my school offers two discrete math courses. the second, though, seems to me purely like an algorithms course.
    MATH 263 Discrete Mathematics II
    4-0-4
    Algorithms and algorithm efficiency; big-O, big-Ohm, big-Q and little-o notation; average and worst-case speed; sorting algorithms; graphs, adjacency and incidence matrices; paths; connectedness; bipartite graphs; isomorphism; Euler and Hamilton paths; shortest paths; Dijkstra’s algorithm; planarity; Euler’s formula; graph coloring; trees; tree traversal; prefix, infix and postfix notation; spanning trees and minimum spanning trees (Prim, Kruskal). Formal languages, finite state machines and automata may also be discussed. Only offered in spring semester and summer II session. Prerequisite: MATH 163 with a grade of “C” or better.

    (MATH 163 is discrete mathematics 1, by the way)

    it looks like a 300 or 400 level algorithm course at a major institute. why is it regarded as a math course, here? why does it have no computer science prerequisites at all? and further, why is it not even on the CS track!?

    i have sent off an email to the CS curriculum coordinator, but i'm not sure how long i'll be waiting for a response given it's the summer.

    thanks for any explanation y'all might be able to offer wrt this

    Yes. That reads like a traditional algorithms course. The diversion into formal languages and automata is dipping into the theory of computation which is its own course. The standard discrete mathematics course (I assume that's what discrete mathematics I is) will talk about proofs, sets, relations, etc.

    Frequently at smaller institutions mathematics and cs are closely coupled so it's not unheard of that these classes are shuffled into math.

    @TwitchTV, @Youtube: master-level zerg ladder/customs, commentary, and random miscellany.
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    I'm willing to bet you have a Data Structures & Algorithms course that is almost identical to that Discrete Math II class.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Linear Algebra and Calc 1 is all I was required to take for an Associates. Calc 1's practical use is pretty much null, at least in my line of work. I think... (when I was doing my pre-med BA deg) the 4 year schools go up to calc2 + physics (more math than science anyways).

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    My school had us do Calc I through III, Discrete Math, Matrix Algebra, and one other math that I cannot seem to remember the name of.

    e: For BS, not Associates. Associates only required Business Calculus.

    urahonky on
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Ohhh I get to download a few rootkits to test against. I'm guessing I can't just Google "rootkits" and get to downloading. Anyone have any suggestions?

    e: I was thinking the Sony Rootkit (the one they installed when you bought one of their CDs) as it's pretty benign.

    urahonky on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah the sony one would be best. EA had some.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    There is a site, it was like, root.org or something that is like, a security research site you can download rootkits for testing. Lemme see if I can remember.
    edit: Hmmm yep it exists, and it is a security site, but I don't see anything right at the front with actual kits.

    Tofystedeth on
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  • centraldogmacentraldogma Registered User regular
    I had to take Calc 1 and 2 and one higher level Math (the easiest being linear algebra). Discrete Math was under CS and not the Math department, but there was some analog in the Math department for them. Discrete Math 1 was logic, Discrete Math 2 was probability.

    Anyone keeping up on news about Flame:
    Flame — a complex cyberweapon that forced Iran to cut off its Oil Ministry rigs from the Internet — was reportedly written using the same language as games such as Angry Birds.

    Fox News reports that the virus was written using the computer language LUA, which game programmers like because it’s simple and stable. It’s also easy to embed, the report said, and Flame’s authors may have used the language to make the virus harder to detect.

    When people unite together, they become stronger than the sum of their parts.
    Don't assume bad intentions over neglect and misunderstanding.
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Flame is the rootkit I wish I could get my hands on so that I can study it. Also I love how they had to point out that LUA is "gamer code" and that Flame was written in it... Wonder how long until they try to demonize the language.

  • Joe KJoe K Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    My school had us do Calc I through III, Discrete Math, Matrix Algebra, and one other math that I cannot seem to remember the name of.

    e: For BS, not Associates. Associates only required Business Calculus.

    and this is where the Industry People jump off to say that wouldn't it be nice to have a specialized, standardized, tested SoftwareEng Degree instead of an EE concentration. I mean, learning how to operate steam engines for your EIT is cool and all, but honestly, I'd rather criteria (C++89? C++0X?, K&R C I dunno) to showthat you can actually build systems that work instead of logic mathematics. Yeh, traditionally CS is an extension of Math, but in Industry, there is a more *Enginneering* (Make this work for the cheapest possible) than a Math focus (See if this is theoretically sound).

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    Between Flame and Stuxnet I'm finding the future of state-on-state cybercrime both fascinating and terrifying.

  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    for those of y'all who got CS degrees: what was your highest level math

    I had just four pure math classes, analysis I & II, algebra & topology. I had however a whole fucking bunch of classes that were hidden maths(representation of physical phenomenons, graph theory and at least a couple more). I'm really not convinced those deserved to be modules of their own instead of topics in a class. Shortly after I graduated they halved the number of maths required for a CS degree.

    edit: Also, from speaking with Canadian counterparts( haven't really discussed it with people from the US, so not sure if it's the same there), the number of hours in the math classes we had was significantly higher. It was around 14 to 18 hours a week for the first four semesters.

    zeeny on
  • Joe KJoe K Registered User regular
    zeeny wrote: »
    for those of y'all who got CS degrees: what was your highest level math

    I had just four pure math classes, analysis I & II, algebra & topology. I had however a whole fucking bunch of classes that were hidden maths(representation of physical phenomenons, graph theory and at least a couple more). I'm really not convinced those deserved to be modules of their own instead of topics in a class. Shortly after I graduated they halved the number of maths required for a CS degree.

    edit: Also, from speaking with Canadian counterparts( haven't really discussed it with people from the US, so not sure if it's the same there), the number of hours in the math classes we had was significantly higher. It was around 14 to 18 hours a week for the first four semesters.

    it's what i was talking about - there should be a seperate theoretical CS from Applied CS degrees. In traditional "Sciences", this is the BS/BSEng designation. Theory vs. applied.

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    If I recall, the math I had was Calc 1 & II, Discrete Structures, and Statistics (that was probably a general ed requirement), and one "programming for math students" that I can't remember the name of and took as an elective.

    I hated math, likely because of Calc I, but wish I remembered more of it now.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Tomanta wrote: »
    Between Flame and Stuxnet I'm finding the future of state-on-state cybercrime both fascinating and terrifying.

    You can thank the United States, as it's very likely we had our hand in Stuxnet, Duqu and Flame. If not directly then indirectly.

    The problem of course is that the internet is the great equalizer, and unlike a piece of military technology, any podunk country in the world can create something like Flame.

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    Flame is the rootkit I wish I could get my hands on so that I can study it. Also I love how they had to point out that LUA is "gamer code" and that Flame was written in it... Wonder how long until they try to demonize the language.

    Also notice that it's Fox News reporting that. Go figure, Fox News trying to point out something related to "gaming" is bad.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    Tomanta wrote: »
    Between Flame and Stuxnet I'm finding the future of state-on-state cybercrime both fascinating and terrifying.

    You can thank the United States, as it's very likely we had our hand in Stuxnet, Duqu and Flame. If not directly then indirectly.

    The problem of course is that the internet is the great equalizer, and unlike a piece of military technology, any podunk country in the world can create something like Flame.

    I'm sure it was the US and Israel. But yeah Stuxnet/Duqu/Flame are so very interesting to read about. I think cyber crime prevention is going to be a HUGE industry in the next few years (even more-so than it is now).

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    There is a site, it was like, root.org or something that is like, a security research site you can download rootkits for testing. Lemme see if I can remember.
    edit: Hmmm yep it exists, and it is a security site, but I don't see anything right at the front with actual kits.

    Thank you for this site. I'll check it out the moment I get a computer that isn't connected to our network. :P

  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    I understand that at Waterloo (the school that my CS department split off from back in the day) they still give you a Math degree, not a Science one, for completing their CS program.

    Canadian schools from what I see tend to be a little more Math-centric. It wasn't mandatory but I was doing heavy math/theory/algorithm stuff in 4th year.
    Joe K wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    My school had us do Calc I through III, Discrete Math, Matrix Algebra, and one other math that I cannot seem to remember the name of.

    e: For BS, not Associates. Associates only required Business Calculus.

    and this is where the Industry People jump off to say that wouldn't it be nice to have a specialized, standardized, tested SoftwareEng Degree instead of an EE concentration. I mean, learning how to operate steam engines for your EIT is cool and all, but honestly, I'd rather criteria (C++89? C++0X?, K&R C I dunno) to showthat you can actually build systems that work instead of logic mathematics. Yeh, traditionally CS is an extension of Math, but in Industry, there is a more *Enginneering* (Make this work for the cheapest possible) than a Math focus (See if this is theoretically sound).

    I agree that there should be a more engineering bent to the profession, but I think it has a place for theory more so than engineering. Engineers can't mathematically prove their solutions, but good chunks of CS applied can be. I think it's rather a mix, and while you need to focus on practicality/results you also sometimes need the proof chops to demonstrate critical sections are sound.

    OrokosPA.png
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    There is some doubt that Flame was US/Israel. I certainly wouldn't be surprised if it was (in fact, I expect it to be), but from what I have read there's not really anything in common between it and Stuxnet (not familiar with Duqu)

    Which to me makes it sound like there are multiple groups developing malware independently. Which would make sense given the complexity of the viruses. Also, we need a term for state-sponsored viruses. I almost said spyware :).

    In programming news, I've been playing around with Web2py the last couple of days and am finding it very interesting.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Hmm. I thought that some of the inner workings of Flame resembled those found in Stuxnet?

    e: from wikipedia:
    The internal code has few similarities with other malware, but exploits two of the same security vulnerabilties used previously by Stuxnet to infect systems.

    Ah I was mistaken then.

    urahonky on
  • lazerbeardlazerbeard Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Organichu wrote: »
    for those of y'all who got CS degrees: what was your highest level math? it looks like most american programs just call for calc 1, calc 2, linear algebra, and discrete math (plus the calc-based physics units). but my community college also offers vector calc and diff eq, so i figured hey even if my bsc doesn't call for it, if it'll help me/make me a more well rounded computer scientist...

    if i can take them such that it doesn't overly stress my schedule (re: over the summer or something), do you think they're worthwhile for a dude without a particular specialization or focus?

    Personally, I took up to calc II, two courses in linear algebra, a class on set theory+splines, discrete mathematics, a quaternions (it was also set theory) class and a class on (I can't remember the exact name) using numerical methods to approximate differentiation.

    I went for a math minor and I think it was a good investment.

    When I was still in college I was talking to a veteran engineer about what he wanted to see from recent grads, and he asserted that he'd probably rather hire a mathematics major with a CS minor than a CS major with some math experience. After all Computer Science is at its root telling a computer to do math for you, the more you know about math the more you can know to tell the computer. As to what math classes to take? It depends on what kind of programming you want to do. I took a lot of linear algebra, quaternions etc because I work in games, and they work primarily in transforming shapes in 3D. I don't find my calc classes to be terribly useful in my day-to-day but it is useful for understanding proofs. On the flipside I had a buddy who took a stats class just as the last class to get his math minor. It turned out to be really useful for him when he ended up working on spreadsheet software.

    In general the more math you know, the more tools you'll have for coming at problems from different angles. That's what all the higher level math classes (especially something like set theory or topography) seemed to be: Take in the problem set, transform the problem to a space where the problem is much easier, solve the problem in that space, transform it back to the space that's most appropriate for a computer to consume.

    lazerbeard on
  • centraldogmacentraldogma Registered User regular
    At what point do we start considering CS theory courses, math courses? I mean I had a CS algorithms course that you could probably call a math course, it just dealt with things in a CS focused way. Like, linear optimization is math, but it was taught in the context of computer science. Same with Artificial Intelligence courses. They're basically math courses.

    When people unite together, they become stronger than the sum of their parts.
    Don't assume bad intentions over neglect and misunderstanding.
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Wow, making an AI course into a math course is extremely... weird.

    I could see the underlying concepts be heavy into probability but the whole idea is mimicking humans, not crunching numbers (otherwise you could just make any CS course about math really).

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • centraldogmacentraldogma Registered User regular
    My AI course wasn't all that heavy into the formulas (luckily) like I've heard others have been, but there was a fair amount about search and categorization algorithms still. Things like utility calculations, that might not be high level AI, but it’s a foundation and incredibly useful.

    When people unite together, they become stronger than the sum of their parts.
    Don't assume bad intentions over neglect and misunderstanding.
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    I haven't manually installed phpMyAdmin in five years and could use some help. I'm installing it on an ISS server. I was able to make the writable config folder but it gives me the following setup error and I don't fully understand it.
    Bzip2 compression and decompression requires functions (bzopen, bzcompress) which are unavailable on this system.
    

    bzip2 is something I can download, but what is the problem here? That bzip2 is missing entirely from the system, or just these functions? And if so, where should the folder (or contents) of the bzip2 folder be placed with respect to phpMyAdmin?

    Cantido on
    3DS Friendcode 5413-1311-3767
  • WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Ok.. quick question here (I hope).

    I have a whack of XML data coming from a web request (200+ fields + sub data in there). I created an xsd, then used the xsd tool in VSS2010 to generate a class for it so I can just deserialize it into the object.

    Problem now is I have to take that data and map it to D3 objects (think 1 field per line, if there is sub items i can split it into multi fields on the 1 line).

    Sooo... do I copy and paste a whack of lines and just do a

    order.setData(1,order.something);
    order.setData(2,order.somethingElse);

    or, do i use reflection and try and do it in way less code (and extensible if it comes up). I can specify a "name" for where the data is going so i could technically do
                //Populate main Order Data
                foreach (PropertyInfo p in OrderItem.GetType().GetProperties())
                {
                    if (checkType(p.PropertyType, typeof(int)))
                    {
                        Order.setData(p.Name, ((int)(p.GetValue(OrderItem, null))).ToString());
                    }
                    else if (checkType(p.PropertyType, typeof(decimal)))
                    {
                        Order.setData(p.Name, ((decimal)(p.GetValue(OrderItem, null))).ToString());
                    }
                    and so on (including custom objects)
    

    Any thoughts on the better method?

    Weretaco on
    Unofficial PA IRC chat: #paforums at irc.slashnet.org
  • EvilMonkeyEvilMonkey Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    I understand that at Waterloo (the school that my CS department split off from back in the day) they still give you a Math degree, not a Science one, for completing their CS program.

    If my understanding is correct even the new(ish) School of CS still gives you a math degree. Although I was never clear on how the curriculum differed from the "vanilla" Faculty of Math - CS Edition.

    [PSN: SciencePiggy] [Steam]
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Cantido wrote: »
    I haven't manually installed phpMyAdmin in five years and could use some help. I'm installing it on an ISS server. I was able to make the writable config folder but it gives me the following setup error and I don't fully understand it.
    Bzip2 compression and decompression requires functions (bzopen, bzcompress) which are unavailable on this system.
    

    bzip2 is something I can download, but what is the problem here? That bzip2 is missing entirely from the system, or just these functions? And if so, where should the folder (or contents) of the bzip2 folder be placed with respect to phpMyAdmin?

    http://php.net/manual/en/install.windows.extensions.php

    Example #1

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Jam WarriorJam Warrior Registered User regular
    Hi! I'm Jam. You may remember me from such H/A posts as:

    http://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/155219/how-do-i-get-someone-to-make-my-game-idea-joke-title-learning-to-program

    I recently purchased a book entitled 'Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner.'

    I just now managed to write a little program to make the computer guess the number I'm thinking of by going higher and lower.

    Then I slapped my forehead and rewrote it so it took into account its previous guesses and thus was a lot quicker to get the right answer!

    I am stupidly proud of my tiny achievement.

    I still keep capitalising my functions.

    Okay baby time is over. You can go back to adult discussions now.

    MhCw7nZ.gif
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Cantido wrote: »
    I haven't manually installed phpMyAdmin in five years and could use some help. I'm installing it on an ISS server. I was able to make the writable config folder but it gives me the following setup error and I don't fully understand it.
    Bzip2 compression and decompression requires functions (bzopen, bzcompress) which are unavailable on this system.
    

    bzip2 is something I can download, but what is the problem here? That bzip2 is missing entirely from the system, or just these functions? And if so, where should the folder (or contents) of the bzip2 folder be placed with respect to phpMyAdmin?

    http://php.net/manual/en/install.windows.extensions.php

    Example #1

    Thank you. That line wasn't just commented out, it wasn't there at all. I went ahead and added it in the php.ini file.

    3DS Friendcode 5413-1311-3767
This discussion has been closed.