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YA[Programming]T :: Interview? That's an MVC thing, right?

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Posts

  • Joe KJoe K Registered User regular
    Barrakketh wrote: »

    wow. good ruling. couldnt have happened to a bigger bunch of assholes (oracle).

  • Joe KJoe K Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Cantido wrote: »
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    @Cantido:

    You're employer realizes what's actually involved in a "shopping cart", right? It's not just an interface with an "Add To Cart" button and some session state to track a users cart. You have to deal with security, encryption of user data, payment card interfacing, PayPal interfacing if they want that as a payment option. It's a really serious undertaking, especially for an intern.

    He's aware, and yes it's going to be a tremendous amount of work, and part time no less. My campus has a really nice internship program (one of the "good" career services/experiential learning programs) in which the employer works with a counselor and evaluates you on what you learn. So it's not a "make me rich in x months or i'll fire your ass" situation.

    Hah a fulltime employee would take probably 3-4 months to do that realistically... so, he's going to wait almost a year for a shopping cart? That seems silly.

    check out shopping cart solutions to Django, plone, drupal, etc.... "implement" never means "write from scratch"

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah, worst case I'd just implement the features I wanted into existing shopping carts. Last thing I want to do is fuck around with payment processing.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Does anyone know if it's possible to make a batch script to install public encryption keys? Right now I have to do it one at a time and it takes about 20-30 seconds per certificate because you have to wait until Windows successfully imports it. This isn't TOO much of a problem with only 30ish employees, but the moment we jump to 50 or something then it's going to be WAY too much time to get working.

    I'm looking at certutil.exe but I can't find any way to actually use that tool to do what I need it to.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited June 2012
    certmgr -add -c "[filehere]" -s -r localMachine root
    
    ?

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    That just pops up a certmgr window unfortunately.

  • EvilMonkeyEvilMonkey Registered User regular
    Err replace the dashes with slashes?

    certmgr /add ......

    [PSN: SciencePiggy] [Steam]
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah that's the only thing google turned up for me so far.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    I will never understand why people knowingly choose to program in Python, when Ruby is sitting there smiling at you going "I'm a better designed language that doesn't rely on white space as a significant structure item...oh, and I have the much better meta programming facilities".

    GOD DAMNIT, GO FORTH AND META PROGRAM YOU HEATHENS.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    coda is not exactly a competitor to vim

    you guys

  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited June 2012
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    I will never understand why people knowingly choose to program in Python, when Ruby is sitting there smiling at you going "I'm a better designed language that doesn't rely on white space as a significant structure item...oh, and I have the much better meta programming facilities".

    GOD DAMNIT, GO FORTH AND META PROGRAM YOU HEATHENS.

    maybe i can answer this as a beginner-intermediate. i just started learning to program maybe 15 months ago? the reason that i chose python as opposed to ruby (which was another heavily recommended language) was that it:

    a) had a huge amount of resources online, with plenty of free, legal ebooks and sites dedicated

    and

    b) the ruby 'crowd' struck me- then a neophyte, knowing nothing of the technical stuff- as explicitly for web development. things like rails and the very flashy design made me think "this stuff isn't for doing math and coding applications, it's for making fancy websites"

    correct or not, that was how i saw it when i was picking a starting language. ruby seems- to someone who doesn't comprehend the structural architecture and case uses- like a very niche thing. it did to me, at least.

    Organichu on
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    The reason I started down the Python road was that I was anticipating some semblance of static analysis

    and while Python IDE's can sort of do that, really they can't for the things that truly matter, like dealing with exceptions and stuff deep inside methods



    But this is not something Ruby does anyway.

    When I got to working on real, production websites in Ruby and Python I realized that to be effective you have to basically have the entire codebase inside of your brain at all times to work, and if you are in the position of not being able to work on the same project every day, or even every week, maintaining an even medium sized Rails site can be very challenging



    Python is only slightly better at this, but like I said, it's only skin deep, so my response was just to abandon web development altogether


    Now if I just had some basic scripty type stuff to do, I'd take Ruby... but really I find it unfit to do Real Work in my situation

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    edited June 2012
    That is entirely incorrect, but I can see how you came to that conclusion, since Rails is the most readily known "Ruby thing" around.

    That said, it's the power of Ruby as a language that even made Rails possible. It does ruffle my feathers that "Ruby is Rails" has become this mindset for people, but it is what it is. Ruby was around a long time before Rails existed, and will be around after Rails isn't something people do anymore.

    (Also, Ruby's canonical bible, The Ruby Programming Language, is also a free eBook).

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    @Jasconius: I've maintained several Rails sites I didn't build initially, and I don't find it much harder than maintaining a large code base of any language that I come to late. You absolutely need to learn the code structure, but the nice thing about Rails is that once you know the structure...you know it. I can go from my own personal Rails 3 site to another Rails 3 site, and I know exactly where I am going to find the controllers and views. I know exactly where to look to find their database migrations and models.

    The first thing anyone should do when going to a new established Rails project is to analyze the routing configuration. That will give you an instant snapshot of how data moves through the application.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited June 2012
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    @Jasconius: I've maintained several Rails sites I didn't build initially, and I don't find it much harder than maintaining a large code base of any language that I come to late. You absolutely need to learn the code structure, but the nice thing about Rails is that once you know the structure...you know it. I can go from my own personal Rails 3 site to another Rails 3 site, and I know exactly where I am going to find the controllers and views. I know exactly where to look to find their database migrations and models.

    The first thing anyone should do when going to a new established Rails project is to analyze the routing configuration. That will give you an instant snapshot of how data moves through the application.

    this is only true so long as my application does nothing but connect the lego bricks that are the Rails frameworks

    of course

    that would be really easy to understand

    half of silicon valley is based on this


    but if you are writing large amount of business logic and such, I don't believe that Ruby does anything at all to help you with this other than enable to you use your own brain

    Jasconius on
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    edited June 2012
    I've written some very large Rails apps, and you should be connecting to those lego bricks, or what's the point? If you decide to put your controllers somewhere else, you're completely breaking the Rails engine down. If the person doing the site knew what they were doing, and actually understood Rails, everything should be right where it should be.

    That's kind of the point of convention over configuration. Coming from things like C++ and C#, this makes almost no sense, because we are not used to forced structure or strict conventions. We are used to forcing ourselves to write and follow our own pattern frameworks. Rails IS that pattern framework, and if you're not following it, you're just flat doing it wrong.

    (And yes, there is even a place for just arbitrary business code in Rails...it's called the 'lib', and every class in it is loaded as part of the Rails context. This is where you put your business specific Ruby code that isn't really Rails specific, but will be interacted with in your Rails code, such as your controllers or models).

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    edited June 2012
    Not really sure that's holy crap worthy. I think most of us have known for a while that the US was behind Stuxnet, and probably had a hand in Flame. The fact that the President (Bush and then Obama) knew about it and gave the thumbs up is pretty obvious too.

    I guess that it's coming out, especially when military intelligence circles close to the president are incredibly tight lipped, is odd.

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Seems funny that centrifuges were taken offline by a worm.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Seems worse that the US knew about the alleged security holes in those centrifuges. That's like bad design, bad security, and bad computer protection all in one.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    coda is not exactly a competitor to vim

    you guys

    Coda from what I can see is what I would use for PHP/HTML/CSS/JavaScript? Which I all do in vim.

    OrokosPA.png
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Okay well we had "assumed" it was the US but now we've got confirmation.

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    Jasconius wrote: »
    coda is not exactly a competitor to vim

    you guys

    Coda from what I can see is what I would use for PHP/HTML/CSS/JavaScript? Which I all do in vim.

    it's meant to be more of a webmaster swiss army knife. with FTP, SSH, source control, etc, all integrated into their application

    the code editor itself is a small piece of that


    it's like what Dreamweaver should have been but never was


    their iPad app for SSH, by the way, is awesome

  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    I will never understand why people knowingly choose to program in Python, when Ruby is sitting there smiling at you going "I'm a better designed language that doesn't rely on white space as a significant structure item...oh, and I have the much better meta programming facilities".

    GOD DAMNIT, GO FORTH AND META PROGRAM YOU HEATHENS.

    I use python over ruby as a c++ developer for a single reason. The syntax is closer to what I use on a daily basis so I find it easier to parse and understand. I haven't tried meta-programming in Ruby, but I am happy with the abilities that python offers (coming from a c++ developer).

  • an_altan_alt Registered User regular
    My boss and junior developer have independently come to the conclusion that "those Python frameworks" would probably be the best bet for our upcoming project. Now I get to make a choice between web2py and Django, but I'm not really sure which way I'm leaning.

    Has anyone here spent much time with web2Py? If so, how is it for leaving you alone when you want to get away from the front end web services and pages?

    Pony wrote:
    I think that the internet has been for years on the path to creating what is essentially an electronic Necronomicon: A collection of blasphemous unrealities so perverse that to even glimpse at its contents, if but for a moment, is to irrevocably forfeit a portion of your sanity.
    Xbox - PearlBlueS0ul, Steam
    If you ever need to talk to someone, feel free to message me. Yes, that includes you.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    Web2py is a very simple, low level framework. It's like Merb in the Ruby world. Django is a much fatter framework, made to structure MVC RESTful apps. It's analog would be Rails.

    Do you plan to do your app as a RESTful MVC app? If so, use Djagno. If you think you're going to do a lot of custom routing to custom non-RESTful actions and not using an MVC structure, then web2py is a better base to build your own framework on.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    I should really get into the loops of things when it comes to web stuff.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    You'll regret it.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    Jasconius wrote: »
    coda is not exactly a competitor to vim

    you guys

    Coda from what I can see is what I would use for PHP/HTML/CSS/JavaScript? Which I all do in vim.

    it's meant to be more of a webmaster swiss army knife. with FTP, SSH, source control, etc, all integrated into their application

    the code editor itself is a small piece of that


    it's like what Dreamweaver should have been but never was


    their iPad app for SSH, by the way, is awesome

    Still everything I currently use vim for then, right?

    I don't understand your claim that it is not a competitor when the proposal would be "stop using vim and use coda."

    OrokosPA.png
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    It's finally here gentlemen. http://www.mla.org/style/handbook_faq/cite_a_tweet MLA format for citing a tweet.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    You'll regret it.

    Oh I'm sure it'll be in one ear out the other... However these buzzwords keep being thrown around and I'd like to partially understand it.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    It's finally here gentlemen. http://www.mla.org/style/handbook_faq/cite_a_tweet MLA format for citing a tweet.

    Haha what.

    Why would you want to cite a tweet, Ever, in a professional document?

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    It's finally here gentlemen. http://www.mla.org/style/handbook_faq/cite_a_tweet MLA format for citing a tweet.

    Haha what.

    Why would you want to cite a tweet, Ever, in a professional document?

    Hey xXxdonkeypunchx69xXx has some good tweets every once in a while.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    It's finally here gentlemen. http://www.mla.org/style/handbook_faq/cite_a_tweet MLA format for citing a tweet.

    Haha what.

    Why would you want to cite a tweet, Ever, in a professional document?

    I can see marketing firms doing it, as social media is a huge marketing avenue right now.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    LordTwoInThePink tweeting about current events. I'd love to quote that actually. I approve.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Do marketing firms use MLA documentation for presentations or reporting? I can't see twitter as a really great source to cite, that you couldn't get elsewhere anyways.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank What the what? Portland, OregonRegistered User regular
    I have no idea wtf MLA is, so I have no idea...to me the conversation was just presented as "Why would anyone cite a tweet in a professional document?"

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    Now people can publish papers proving tweeting is dumb, by citing said tweets.

This discussion has been closed.