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YA[Programming]T :: Interview? That's an MVC thing, right?

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    JHunzJHunz Registered User regular
    Poor communication? This is not a matter of poor communication.

    The CEO and COO, in a private meeting, both managed to give the PM the impression that OT was being approved. They then informed you after you worked it that it wasn't, and told you to falsify your timecard.

    Seriously, dude, wake up. You're working in a shithole. Get out!

    bunny.gif Gamertag: JHunz. R.I.P. Mygamercard.net bunny.gif
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    And contact the DoL so they can shitream the company.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Seriously, Honky, you're working for some real assholes.

    In context here, at least the context we have, had this happened to me I would have told the CEO that my PM had told me it was approved. I came in and worked on that condition. Either they pay you for your time in good-faith and you go forward understanding that you need to check with the CEO before taking your PM at his/her word, or you'll be willing to call the Dept of Labor to see what recourse you have, if any.

    You should be PISSED. Not shrugging. They just got free fucking labor out of you, and told you to go eat shit when you asked if you could get fucking paid for it, dude.

    Alternately, get ready for a whole metric-fuckload of "there was a miscommunication." 'Cause they'll learn real quickly that they can get away with under-valuing your time whenever they'd like, why-ever they'd like.

    iTunesIsEvil on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yup, happened to me with being on call and "salary". Don't let it happen to you honky.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Oh I'm absolutely pissed. Don't get me wrong. My issue is that I don't want to get the PM in any more trouble than he is right now for telling us it was okay. Still need to talk to them about getting my yearly review done. Everyone who normally does it has been busy as all hell for the last week. But I'm going to talk to the COO whenever she decides to come in and ask her to make a date.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    Oh I'm absolutely pissed. Don't get me wrong. My issue is that I don't want to get the PM in any more trouble than he is right now for telling us it was okay. Still need to talk to them about getting my yearly review done. Everyone who normally does it has been busy as all hell for the last week. But I'm going to talk to the COO whenever she decides to come in and ask her to make a date.

    It's September dude. And the other thing... that's not really your problem.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    They don't do end of year reviews, they go by whenever you get hired. I was hired in the beginning of September last year.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Oh, well, that's strange.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    JHunzJHunz Registered User regular
    Reviews are weird. I've seen them in January, at the beginning of the fiscal year (whenever that happens to be), in a random month. Staggering them per-employee is a little unusual, but not surprising.

    bunny.gif Gamertag: JHunz. R.I.P. Mygamercard.net bunny.gif
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    DrunkMcDrunkMc Registered User regular
    The first company I worked for straight out of College asked us to work, "Voluntary Overtime", which means the manager completely fucked up the hours and we're out of money but still have tons of work left to do. And the best was, she said work more then 40hrs a week, but put 40 on your time card. I told her No. I wanted the project done, so I said I'll put 40 down paid, then I'll put the rest of the hours down but mark it unpaid. She flipped out in a meeting on me cause of that. I told her falsifying time cards is unethical, whether you put more hours then you work or less hours and I won't do it! I then told her it's bullshit like this that you guys keep under bidding contracts and always come up short!!

    I was the only one who knew what was going on in the entire project, so I got away with yelling and cursing in meetings. Was a nice perk. :-P And I left the company 6 months later.

    At the very least Honky, take a half day Friday and put you worked 40.

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    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    Some day I will work on a platform where poorly setup replication/HA configurations don't actually cause nearly 100% of the down time.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah don't count on it. I have a 100% reflected test bed system and I still get random issues that don't show up on my test side at all. I can't explain it.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Yeah I have to take my rental car back to get my old car that was in the shop for being hit. I also get allergy shots on Wednesdays. So I'll find a way to make up the time.

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    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Yeah don't count on it. I have a 100% reflected test bed system and I still get random issues that don't show up on my test side at all. I can't explain it.
    Oh, no. I mean that in all of my experience it's the HA setup that actually CAUSES the downtime in the first place nearly every time. It's fucking ridiculous.

    At my previous job there was some bug with our RH servers and GFS so that when a single server would blow up, rather than being removed from the cluster, it would lock the GFS cluster so that none of the servers worked. This happened like once a month.

    Now today I get a call before work that the platform I wrote is down. I do some talking to the sys admins. You know what caused it? Disk space on the db server filled up. What filled it up? Binary logs for db replication over the failover system which was not failed over to.

    grumble grumble grumble

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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    @DrunkMc yeah this isn't the first place to do this to me. It's really annoying. If I work 45 then I should be paid for that much.

    However if I'm working on something and I do something to screw it up then I'm more than happy to stay and fix my mistake off the clock.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I won't anymore. That turns into "well you did this slightly different than the client expected, so, we're going to ask you to fix it." I will on jobs I like, and if things are going smoothly, and I seriously did fuck up, and they haven't been dicks to me over the past year.

    If I screwed up, well, I hope you quoted debugging and revisions in your project because fuck you, mistakes happen, and I do a job for you.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Joe KJoe K Registered User regular
    i dont understand people or companies that have off-the-books non-paid overtime. it's not legal, just because you're classified as salary exempt doesn't actually make it so, and quite frankly it's immoral. i already spend 1.5 hours a day commuting, 30 min at lunch and 8 hours working. i'd like to see my family a bit and actually have a life.

    i have been known to work crazy hours - if the employer was exceptional and the rewards were clear and substantial. one of the startups i was at gave me a shitload of options and making the last bit of a customized image work in time for production that quarter was actually very impactful to the company and my own fortunes. If you want me to act like I have an interest in the company, GIVE ME AN INTEREST IN THE COMPANY.

    but hell if i'm working more than 40 hours a week if my only reward is keeping my job. i document this shit, and I have no problem raising a legal ruckus if needed to protect MY interests.

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    PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    So, here's a fun bug.

    When writing a network driver for Windows you can give the stack packets either by calling NdisMIndicateReceievePacket to give it a bunch of packets at once, or NdisMEthIndicateReceive to give it packets one at a time.

    So, naturally I decide to use the first one. It turns out the first one works fine everywhere except for IPv4 on Windows XP, which apparently requires the second method or it will silently discard your packets. And I had to figure this out by single stepping through the network stack

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    They keep it off the books and ask you to change your time card because if the DoL ever got wind and they went through the past 20 years of payroll they may owe substantially more money to be paid out to ex employees. That's why they do it. You probably know that, but honky might now.

    Never, ever, ever ,ever ,ever adjust your time card. Ever.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Gilbert0Gilbert0 North of SeattleRegistered User regular
    So welcome to Day 1 of working from home for me. I'm now a province away from my users, only accessible through email/cell phone and I think I've gotten more done this morning than I did all my last week.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    It's amazing. I get more done in 2 hours at home than I do for a whole week. "done" being figurative because I still babysit users while I'm here but my actual work which has time constraints suffer greatly and I don't think they understand it.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    wildwoodwildwood Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    They keep it off the books and ask you to change your time card because if the DoL ever got wind and they went through the past 20 years of payroll they may owe substantially more money to be paid out to ex employees. That's why they do it. You probably know that, but honky might now.

    Never, ever, ever ,ever ,ever adjust your time card. Ever.

    Absolutely. Paper trail, paper trail.

    At the very least, if the CEO tells you to alter your time sheet, ask him to make that request in writing (either paper or email). That's sometimes enough to get people to back off from unethical requests.

    If he refuses to email it to you, then force him into it. Send him an email (bcc'ed to your personal email) saying, "Just so I'm clear - you told me to do X and X, is that correct?" Force everything into email like that as much as you can.

    It's not as effective as going straight to the DoL, but it gives you a paper trail to document what's going on. And, @urahonky, you are definitely in CYA territory as long as you're at this job.

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    Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Monkey Ball Warrior on
    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
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    khainkhain Registered User regular
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    They aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, but at most companies they won't pay overtime and expect you to get your work done. In my experience the best way to handle this is to be able to accurately estimate tasks and then only agree to schedules that you can actually meet since people will expect you to get your work done on time.

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    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from yourand base overtime hours on that.

    OrokosPA.png
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    khainkhain Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Infidel wrote: »
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from your and base overtime hours on that.

    This isn't false at all unless I'm missing some critical law since FLSA is pretty specific. It states that employees are exempt if they are a) paid more than $23,600, b) paid salary, c) duties performed at work fall under the exempt definition under FLSA. You can look on the FLSA site if you want the definition for exempt, but it's basically professional jobs that specialized education which engineers fall under. Also since we're on this topic nothing in FLSA prohibits your employer from requiring mandatory overtime or pretty much anything as you basically get nothing under it as exempt. I'm pretty sure there are no federal laws that contradict the above or grant more rights, there may be state laws but that would obviously require you to work in a specific state. There may also be some outs with what your contract says and certain companies do pay overtime anyway, but in my limited experience and what I know of the software industry in general at least limited overtime is expected and chances are pretty high that you have nothing in writing about agreed upon hours. Of course even with all this, I don't think most companies will fire you for not working overtimes, it's just highly likely that regardless of how good you actually are it will reflect badly on you especially if everyone else does it.


    edit: Just to be clear I am making the assumption that the people who post about work in this thread are software engineers. If you are not, then you should probably go look at FLSA to see if your actually an exempt employee or not.

    khain on
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    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from your and base overtime hours on that.

    This isn't false at all unless I'm missing some critical law since FLSA is pretty specific. It states that employees are exempt if they are a) paid more than $23,600, b) paid salary, c) duties performed at work fall under the exempt definition under FLSA. You can look on the FLSA site if you want the definition for exempt, but it's basically professional jobs that specialized education which engineers fall under. Also since we're on this topic nothing in FLSA prohibits your employer from requiring mandatory overtime or pretty much anything as you basically get nothing under it as exempt. I'm pretty sure there are no federal laws that contradict the above or grant more rights, there may be state laws but that would obviously require you to work in a specific state. There may also be some outs with what your contract says and certain companies do pay overtime anyway, but in my limited experience and what I know of the software industry in general at least limited overtime is expected and chances are pretty high that you have nothing in writing about agreed upon hours. Of course even with all this, I don't think most companies will fire you for not working overtimes, it's just highly likely that regardless of how good you actually are it will reflect badly on you especially if everyone else does it.


    edit: Just to be clear I am making the assumption that the people who post about work in this thread are software engineers. If you are not, then you should probably go look at FLSA to see if your actually an exempt employee or not.

    So salaried workers can never claim overtime?

    OrokosPA.png
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    Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    I'm a software developer, I don't think I've quite reached a point where I could call myself a software engineer or a data scientist yet and still keep a straight face.

    But I got my B.S. less than a month ago, so in a few years that might change...

    Monkey Ball Warrior on
    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
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    khainkhain Registered User regular
    Infidel wrote: »
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from your and base overtime hours on that.

    This isn't false at all unless I'm missing some critical law since FLSA is pretty specific. It states that employees are exempt if they are a) paid more than $23,600, b) paid salary, c) duties performed at work fall under the exempt definition under FLSA. You can look on the FLSA site if you want the definition for exempt, but it's basically professional jobs that specialized education which engineers fall under. Also since we're on this topic nothing in FLSA prohibits your employer from requiring mandatory overtime or pretty much anything as you basically get nothing under it as exempt. I'm pretty sure there are no federal laws that contradict the above or grant more rights, there may be state laws but that would obviously require you to work in a specific state. There may also be some outs with what your contract says and certain companies do pay overtime anyway, but in my limited experience and what I know of the software industry in general at least limited overtime is expected and chances are pretty high that you have nothing in writing about agreed upon hours. Of course even with all this, I don't think most companies will fire you for not working overtimes, it's just highly likely that regardless of how good you actually are it will reflect badly on you especially if everyone else does it.


    edit: Just to be clear I am making the assumption that the people who post about work in this thread are software engineers. If you are not, then you should probably go look at FLSA to see if your actually an exempt employee or not.

    So salaried workers can never claim overtime?

    Is this suppose to be sarcastic, because the second sentence of my post is pretty clear about what makes a salaried worker exempt.

    Not sure what MBW has against being called an engineer given that pretty much any programmer fits the definition, but call yourself whatever you want you still fit under the FLSA computer professional exemption.

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    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from your and base overtime hours on that.

    This isn't false at all unless I'm missing some critical law since FLSA is pretty specific. It states that employees are exempt if they are a) paid more than $23,600, b) paid salary, c) duties performed at work fall under the exempt definition under FLSA. You can look on the FLSA site if you want the definition for exempt, but it's basically professional jobs that specialized education which engineers fall under. Also since we're on this topic nothing in FLSA prohibits your employer from requiring mandatory overtime or pretty much anything as you basically get nothing under it as exempt. I'm pretty sure there are no federal laws that contradict the above or grant more rights, there may be state laws but that would obviously require you to work in a specific state. There may also be some outs with what your contract says and certain companies do pay overtime anyway, but in my limited experience and what I know of the software industry in general at least limited overtime is expected and chances are pretty high that you have nothing in writing about agreed upon hours. Of course even with all this, I don't think most companies will fire you for not working overtimes, it's just highly likely that regardless of how good you actually are it will reflect badly on you especially if everyone else does it.


    edit: Just to be clear I am making the assumption that the people who post about work in this thread are software engineers. If you are not, then you should probably go look at FLSA to see if your actually an exempt employee or not.

    So salaried workers can never claim overtime?

    Is this suppose to be sarcastic, because the second sentence of my post is pretty clear about what makes a salaried worker exempt.

    Not sure what MBW has against being called an engineer given that pretty much any programmer fits the definition, but call yourself whatever you want you still fit under the FLSA computer professional exemption.

    So my post stands, salary and overtime are not mutually exclusive and you are owed overtime unless you're exempt.

    edit: Oh and of course FLSA doesn't apply to everyone. How the hell did programmers get pinned with an exemption??

    Infidel on
    OrokosPA.png
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    ASimPersonASimPerson Cold... and hard.Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    At my company (which some of you probably know but anyway it's a large multinational corporation based in Silicon Valley, which is also where I work), there are two types of employees: non-exempt and exempt. The former get overtime, the latter do not.

    Due to some lawsuits and whatnot lower-grade engineers are actually non-exempt as per California labor law. More senior engineers are exempt.

    My management isn't assholes so we didn't really have any timecard shenanigans, which means that I thought they were a huge pain in the ass. I was very happy to get promoted to an exempt paygrade.

    ASimPerson on
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    Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    khain wrote: »
    Infidel wrote: »
    I thought salaried and OT were mutually exclusive? In that salary means you are paid $X irrespective of if you work 40 hours, 30 hours, 60 hours, whatever.

    I'm salaried now and it is weird. I'm shooting for working roughly 40/wk, but I expect it will be more once I've learned enough about how they do things here and how this jumble of code is arranged so that I'm not just dead weight.

    Totally false. Huge misconception. Let's companies get away with it.

    You have agreed upon hours. Anything over that is overtime. Unless you are overtime-exempt or have some agreement like "yeah sure I'll work all the hours ever" there is overtime owed.

    You calculate your hourly wage from your and base overtime hours on that.

    This isn't false at all unless I'm missing some critical law since FLSA is pretty specific. It states that employees are exempt if they are a) paid more than $23,600, b) paid salary, c) duties performed at work fall under the exempt definition under FLSA. You can look on the FLSA site if you want the definition for exempt, but it's basically professional jobs that specialized education which engineers fall under. Also since we're on this topic nothing in FLSA prohibits your employer from requiring mandatory overtime or pretty much anything as you basically get nothing under it as exempt. I'm pretty sure there are no federal laws that contradict the above or grant more rights, there may be state laws but that would obviously require you to work in a specific state. There may also be some outs with what your contract says and certain companies do pay overtime anyway, but in my limited experience and what I know of the software industry in general at least limited overtime is expected and chances are pretty high that you have nothing in writing about agreed upon hours. Of course even with all this, I don't think most companies will fire you for not working overtimes, it's just highly likely that regardless of how good you actually are it will reflect badly on you especially if everyone else does it.


    edit: Just to be clear I am making the assumption that the people who post about work in this thread are software engineers. If you are not, then you should probably go look at FLSA to see if your actually an exempt employee or not.

    So salaried workers can never claim overtime?

    Is this suppose to be sarcastic, because the second sentence of my post is pretty clear about what makes a salaried worker exempt.

    Not sure what MBW has against being called an engineer given that pretty much any programmer fits the definition, but call yourself whatever you want you still fit under the FLSA computer professional exemption.

    Well if someone called me an engineer, I wouldn't argue with them about it. I would be flattered. I don't have anything against it: Before I got this job I absolutely looked for jobs that were listed as software engineer, among other things.

    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
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    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    I'm slowly warming up to CodeIgniter. (Pun not intended.)

    Apart from the whole "its PHP :rotate: " it's not too bad.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Infidel, yeah in the US exempt for programmers meant the OT thing. They got exempt because a lot of people found out programmers specifically were getting paid like $12 an hour salary wise. So they wrote the exemption, if you're not getting $23/hr, even if you're salary, you're not technically exempt from OT. (Game companies specifically were abusing this, asking their employees to work like 80+ hour weeks for $12 an hour).

    Though, when I get a contract I work in comp time and OT pay because fuck you if you think I'm busting my ass for you. It keeps them honest. Otherwise you end up in Honky's position where he's working 80 hours and OT may not be approved, and they string you through all these hoops, and then decide you should be salary at some point.

    Basically junior devs don't really have much wiggle room in negotiation and get screwed with the exempt status/no OT pay. Senior and intermediate devs who are a bit more valuable can bend a company over their leg a bit. Still looking for a company that gives me awesome flex time.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Sorry guys, hectic day after 1pm... Yeah I'm salaried-exempt. He specifically mentioned that I HAVE to bill 80 hours. I'm guessing that if I ever work OT then it would be on Overhead or something like that.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    You get paid overtime though?

    Also I bet dollars to donuts you're not exempt because you do their IT work. There's a rule about that for programmers.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    You get paid overtime though?

    Also I bet dollars to donuts you're not exempt because you do their IT work. There's a rule about that for programmers.

    They're still talking about it. I'm assuming that if I am going to get Overtime it will be using the company's dime, and not the project's dime.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Well yeah, that's not your concern, so long as it's coming from payroll who cares where they allocate the money from.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Well yeah, that's not your concern, so long as it's coming from payroll who cares where they allocate the money from.

    Agreed, but that would explain why they're so hesitant to start the overtime procedure.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Hey not your problem. If work doesn't get done, it doesn't get done. Maybe they won't take on weird ass projects!

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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