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YA[Programming]T :: Interview? That's an MVC thing, right?

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  • Options
    zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    PHP dilemma:

    I have a client who wants to expand her site into e-commerce. She can't afford a 100% custom job, so I'll have to use pre-packaged software. Can anyone recommend something that:

    1. Is nicely coded
    2. Can plug into an existing user membership system
    3. Has a nice back-end so she can add/remove inventory

    Bonus: Do any of them allow for actual credit card payments out of the gate, or would I have to go through the whole payment gateway stuff?

    Right now, she's looking at a generic WYSIWYG sitebuilder that doesn't mention how much it costs per month/year, and I have the feeling it's a rip-off. There's no way to actually get at its back-end, either, so I'm wary.

    What price range are you talking about, assuming there is a price range?

    Edit: Also, assuming you are doing the customization, what frameworks are you familiar with?

    zeeny on
  • Options
    NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    zeeny wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    PHP dilemma:

    I have a client who wants to expand her site into e-commerce. She can't afford a 100% custom job, so I'll have to use pre-packaged software. Can anyone recommend something that:

    1. Is nicely coded
    2. Can plug into an existing user membership system
    3. Has a nice back-end so she can add/remove inventory

    Bonus: Do any of them allow for actual credit card payments out of the gate, or would I have to go through the whole payment gateway stuff?

    Right now, she's looking at a generic WYSIWYG sitebuilder that doesn't mention how much it costs per month/year, and I have the feeling it's a rip-off. There's no way to actually get at its back-end, either, so I'm wary.

    What price range are you talking about, assuming there is a price range?

    Edit: Also, assuming you are doing the customization, what frameworks are you familiar with?

    Price range is up in the air at the moment. I'm waiting to hear back from her.

    For frameworks, I'm pretty comfortable with just about anything that implements MVC. I've used Kohana in the past, and have been fiddling around with Symfony 2+ lately.

  • Options
    EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    @Echo High Five presentation writing. I am currently writing a presentation for other developers for the GP-GPU Scientific Visualization framework/toolkit that I have been working on. The project finally became open source so I am in the process of writing guides on how to use, and how to understand the framework.

  • Options
    DrunkMcDrunkMc Registered User regular
    urahonky wrote: »
    Phyphor wrote: »
    You see, your problem is that you're using swing. Swing is terrible!

    Yes it is. Ugh...

    JAVA GUIs are the worst thing in the history of history. The only thing I like is the Canvas object. Everything else can fuck itself and die.

    On another note, how the HELL did this take me so long to do. About a billion times in all my code I have something like
    Statement stmt = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;
    
    try
    {
       stmt = ...
       rs = stmt....
    
    }catch(SQLException e)
    {
    
    }finally
    {
      try
    { 
      if(stmt!=null)
          stmt.close();
      if(rs!=null)
        rs.close();
    }catch(SQLException e)
    {
        //Don't care
    }
    }
    

    I just realized to make a static function that does the finally block.....
    Statement stmt = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;
    
    try
    {
       stmt = ...
       rs = stmt....
    
    }catch(SQLException e)
    {
    
    }finally
    {
        SQLHelperFunctions.close(stmt,rs);
    }
    

    I know that is useless in JAVA 7, but that'll be forever before our customers allow us to use that.

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    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    That is exactly what DbUtils does with closeQuietly.

    OrokosPA.png
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    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Help me SQL wizards, you're my only hope.

    So I've been charged with cleaning up our database. Specifically, customer address data. We're trying to normalize a lot of that information (namely, the State field) so we can make better use of some BI tools.

    So I've got a State field with things like

    Texas

    TX

    Tx

    T.X.

    TX,

    Tx,

    and so on, across all states. What would be the best way to fix these and normalize them all to the standard US two-character US Postal Code abbreviations?

    (also if you reply, please @ -me since I don't pop in here that often)

    The way I began doing it was through
    SELECT [STATE] FROM dbo.SOP30200 WHERE LEN(STATE) > 2
    UPDATE dbo.SOP30200
    SET [STATE]='OH'
    WHERE [STATE]='Ohio'
    

    And running that against all the variations, but there has to be a better way.

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Help me SQL wizards, you're my only hope.

    [...]

    And running that against all the variations, but there has to be a better way.

    @Smart Hero

    Probably hard to avoid shortening full names like Texas manually without some kind of help from something that can let you map the full names to short.

    But for your two letter examples like T.X. you can fix the punctuation and case by doing something like UPPER(REPLACE(REPLACE(state,'.', ''), ',', '')

    I'm not sure what your database system is though, and the exact syntax will depend on that. I suspect you're using access, but I don't know access very well specifically. (And more detail there might reveal some tools that might help)

    End on
    I wish that someway, somehow, that I could save every one of us
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig.jpg
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    MS SQL

    It's for our ERP/Accounting System, Dynamics GP 2010.

  • Options
    EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    oh, I don't know ms sql either very well (the square brackets made me think access)

    the example I posted is probably pretty close though

    End on
    I wish that someway, somehow, that I could save every one of us
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig.jpg
  • Options
    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    @Smart Hero

    What End suggested, pretty much. Remove the irrelevant bits like punctuation and casing across the whole column.

    In your examples, you'd be left with two values, 'Texas' and 'TX', and one of those is already correct. Update set 'TX' where 'Texas' etc. for the most common variations you've seen.

    You'll find that the vast majority of your data is now fixed. Do a select on the table where the state column doesn't match your normalized state dictionary, and manually fix those that remain.

    SQL is a very easy system to do iterative cleanup of data like this. You don't care if the operation is one row or a million.

    OrokosPA.png
  • Options
    DietarySupplementDietarySupplement Still not approved by the FDA Dublin, OHRegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Help me SQL wizards, you're my only hope.

    So I've been charged with cleaning up our database. Specifically, customer address data. We're trying to normalize a lot of that information (namely, the State field) so we can make better use of some BI tools.

    So I've got a State field with things like

    Texas

    TX

    Tx

    T.X.

    TX,

    Tx,

    and so on, across all states. What would be the best way to fix these and normalize them all to the standard US two-character US Postal Code abbreviations?

    (also if you reply, please @ -me since I don't pop in here that often)

    The way I began doing it was through
    SELECT [STATE] FROM dbo.SOP30200 WHERE LEN(STATE) > 2
    UPDATE dbo.SOP30200
    SET [STATE]='OH'
    WHERE [STATE]='Ohio'
    

    And running that against all the variations, but there has to be a better way.

    Well, here's what I would do (especially if the quality of any future data may be suspect as well):

    1. Create a table of states and postal abbreviations. Simple, two column set up, and create a primary clustered key on postal abbreviation. Also create an index on the state names, too.
    2. Create a function called fn_Stripper, with the following code:
    SET ANSI_NULLS ON
    GO
    SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
    GO
    CREATE FUNCTION fn_Stripper
    (
    	@inputText nvarchar(max) = null
    )
    RETURNS nvarchar(2)
    AS
    BEGIN
    	DECLARE @cleanedStateInput nvarchar(100);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = UPPER(@inputText);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '.', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, ' ', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '-', '');
    	-- add in any other permutations here
    	
    	-- now search your state table for the state name or the state abbreviation (so it doesn't matter what they provided)
    	
    	SELECT @cleanedStateInput = StateAbbreviation FROM Lookup_StateTable WHERE StateAbbreviation = @cleanedStateInput OR StateName = @cleanedStateInput
    	RETURN @cleanedStateInput	
    END
    GO
    

    3. With your function ready, all you have to do now is just do an update statement (or, if you're gun-shy, a select statement first)
    UPDATE <your table name here> SET OriginalStateColumn = [fn_Stripper] (OriginalStateColumn);
    

    The benefit here is that the function doesn't care what you give it (either the state name or state abbreviation), it will remove spaces, dots, dashes, etc and then do a lookup on your state table to get the correct abbreviation. It will return null if no match is found. So if your table is going to get new data at some point with dubious data quality, this will continue to work.

    edit: I used nvarchar instead of varchar (force of habit, I do a lot of unicode stuff) but if that's not important to you or data, just change it any nvarchar text varchar.

    DietarySupplement on
  • Options
    DietarySupplementDietarySupplement Still not approved by the FDA Dublin, OHRegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    edit: sick double post

    DietarySupplement on
  • Options
    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    That sounds as fun as that database with 27 variations of "Norway" I was told about once.

  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Help me SQL wizards, you're my only hope.

    So I've been charged with cleaning up our database. Specifically, customer address data. We're trying to normalize a lot of that information (namely, the State field) so we can make better use of some BI tools.

    So I've got a State field with things like

    Texas

    TX

    Tx

    T.X.

    TX,

    Tx,

    and so on, across all states. What would be the best way to fix these and normalize them all to the standard US two-character US Postal Code abbreviations?

    (also if you reply, please @ -me since I don't pop in here that often)

    The way I began doing it was through
    SELECT [STATE] FROM dbo.SOP30200 WHERE LEN(STATE) > 2
    UPDATE dbo.SOP30200
    SET [STATE]='OH'
    WHERE [STATE]='Ohio'
    

    And running that against all the variations, but there has to be a better way.

    Well, here's what I would do (especially if the quality of any future data may be suspect as well):

    1. Create a table of states and postal abbreviations. Simple, two column set up, and create a primary clustered key on postal abbreviation. Also create an index on the state names, too.
    2. Create a function called fn_Stripper, with the following code:
    SET ANSI_NULLS ON
    GO
    SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
    GO
    CREATE FUNCTION fn_Stripper
    (
    	@inputText nvarchar(max) = null
    )
    RETURNS nvarchar(2)
    AS
    BEGIN
    	DECLARE @cleanedStateInput nvarchar(100);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = UPPER(@inputText);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '.', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, ' ', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '-', '');
    	-- add in any other permutations here
    	
    	-- now search your state table for the state name or the state abbreviation (so it doesn't matter what they provided)
    	
    	SELECT @cleanedStateInput = StateAbbreviation FROM Lookup_StateTable WHERE StateAbbreviation = @cleanedStateInput OR StateName = @cleanedStateInput
    	RETURN @cleanedStateInput	
    END
    GO
    

    3. With your function ready, all you have to do now is just do an update statement (or, if you're gun-shy, a select statement first)
    UPDATE <your table name here> SET OriginalStateColumn = [fn_Stripper] (OriginalStateColumn);
    

    The benefit here is that the function doesn't care what you give it (either the state name or state abbreviation), it will remove spaces, dots, dashes, etc and then do a lookup on your state table to get the correct abbreviation. It will return null if no match is found. So if your table is going to get new data at some point with dubious data quality, this will continue to work.

    edit: I used nvarchar instead of varchar (force of habit, I do a lot of unicode stuff) but if that's not important to you or data, just change it any nvarchar text varchar.

    You are awesome, thanks!

    There's a few other wrinkles, because our people are stupid. They've occasionally dropped in zip codes into the State field, or countries if they couldn't figure out where else to put it.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    zeeny wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    PHP dilemma:

    I have a client who wants to expand her site into e-commerce. She can't afford a 100% custom job, so I'll have to use pre-packaged software. Can anyone recommend something that:

    1. Is nicely coded
    2. Can plug into an existing user membership system
    3. Has a nice back-end so she can add/remove inventory

    Bonus: Do any of them allow for actual credit card payments out of the gate, or would I have to go through the whole payment gateway stuff?

    Right now, she's looking at a generic WYSIWYG sitebuilder that doesn't mention how much it costs per month/year, and I have the feeling it's a rip-off. There's no way to actually get at its back-end, either, so I'm wary.

    What price range are you talking about, assuming there is a price range?

    Edit: Also, assuming you are doing the customization, what frameworks are you familiar with?

    Price range is up in the air at the moment. I'm waiting to hear back from her.

    For frameworks, I'm pretty comfortable with just about anything that implements MVC. I've used Kohana in the past, and have been fiddling around with Symfony 2+ lately.

    Honestly if it were me I'd work google checkouts assuming I only want to take payments from the US + a few other places. Then wrap a solution around that. Some payment processors seem like robber barons, like paypal, and most of these random 3rd party ones.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    DietarySupplementDietarySupplement Still not approved by the FDA Dublin, OHRegistered User regular
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Help me SQL wizards, you're my only hope.

    So I've been charged with cleaning up our database. Specifically, customer address data. We're trying to normalize a lot of that information (namely, the State field) so we can make better use of some BI tools.

    So I've got a State field with things like

    Texas

    TX

    Tx

    T.X.

    TX,

    Tx,

    and so on, across all states. What would be the best way to fix these and normalize them all to the standard US two-character US Postal Code abbreviations?

    (also if you reply, please @ -me since I don't pop in here that often)

    The way I began doing it was through
    SELECT [STATE] FROM dbo.SOP30200 WHERE LEN(STATE) > 2
    UPDATE dbo.SOP30200
    SET [STATE]='OH'
    WHERE [STATE]='Ohio'
    

    And running that against all the variations, but there has to be a better way.

    Well, here's what I would do (especially if the quality of any future data may be suspect as well):

    1. Create a table of states and postal abbreviations. Simple, two column set up, and create a primary clustered key on postal abbreviation. Also create an index on the state names, too.
    2. Create a function called fn_Stripper, with the following code:
    SET ANSI_NULLS ON
    GO
    SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
    GO
    CREATE FUNCTION fn_Stripper
    (
    	@inputText nvarchar(max) = null
    )
    RETURNS nvarchar(2)
    AS
    BEGIN
    	DECLARE @cleanedStateInput nvarchar(100);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = UPPER(@inputText);
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '.', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, ' ', '');
    	SET @cleanedStateInput = REPLACE(@cleanedStateInput, '-', '');
    	-- add in any other permutations here
    	
    	-- now search your state table for the state name or the state abbreviation (so it doesn't matter what they provided)
    	
    	SELECT @cleanedStateInput = StateAbbreviation FROM Lookup_StateTable WHERE StateAbbreviation = @cleanedStateInput OR StateName = @cleanedStateInput
    	RETURN @cleanedStateInput	
    END
    GO
    

    3. With your function ready, all you have to do now is just do an update statement (or, if you're gun-shy, a select statement first)
    UPDATE <your table name here> SET OriginalStateColumn = [fn_Stripper] (OriginalStateColumn);
    

    The benefit here is that the function doesn't care what you give it (either the state name or state abbreviation), it will remove spaces, dots, dashes, etc and then do a lookup on your state table to get the correct abbreviation. It will return null if no match is found. So if your table is going to get new data at some point with dubious data quality, this will continue to work.

    edit: I used nvarchar instead of varchar (force of habit, I do a lot of unicode stuff) but if that's not important to you or data, just change it any nvarchar text varchar.

    You are awesome, thanks!

    There's a few other wrinkles, because our people are stupid. They've occasionally dropped in zip codes into the State field, or countries if they couldn't figure out where else to put it.

    Null sweat, chummer. Truthfully, that's not a super-elegant solution because each update to your table incurs two reads (source row + look-up) as well as the disk write. So I wouldn't use it in real time (like, say, part of an ETL job), maybe just for data clean-up.

    But it's good to know that my knowledge is good for something. Sat for a 2nd interview yesterday for a senior DBA role, and I totally hosed myself in the technical interview (read: sit here and do this while we watch). It had been so long since I sat one that I just totally psyched myself out.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Hah technical interviews are dumb. They don't even test real abilities. Sure I can do these simple tasks but if I don't use my google who knows! Why do people want someone that can do shit from memory so much? That concept is completely foreign to me, and I don't understand why school's pride themselves on those abilities. Doctors I think are about the only people who I'd want to have them.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    I always want to ask them if it's because they can't afford manuals.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Hah now I have to do that next time I go to an interview. "What you don't have reference materials or google?"

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    I find the concept of expecting me to know the entire language like the back of my hand silly and completely unrealistic.

    I <3 my Ruby reference books.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    You should see my desk. I have at least 3 books open, plus a few binders, and my 2 other monitors are opened to example pages on stack overflow.

    I'm like a code aggregator.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    The other thing I like about remembering roughly what I need and googling for specifics is that my searches occasionally reveal a new (or new to me, at least) library or way of doing something, different from the way I'd done it in the past and was just looking for a reminder about. If I had actually remembered the old way, I never would have found the new, better way.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    For instance I used to detest linq but now I fell in love with it.

    Reducing 40 some odd lines of code down to 4 makes me feel good in my happy place.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    JHunzJHunz Registered User regular
    As far as technical interviews go, my company (including me) doesn't use them to test whether people have retained every single detail about a language or technology, we use them to test if people actually have a functioning brain. Seeing how people think about something they are not necessarily familiar with is a great indicator of whether they'd be a useful hire.

    bunny.gif Gamertag: JHunz. R.I.P. Mygamercard.net bunny.gif
  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    You should see my desk. I have at least 3 books open, plus a few binders, and my 2 other monitors are opened to example pages on stack overflow.

    I'm like a code aggregator.

    I can't even fit a notebook on my desk you bastard.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    My desk wraps around 2 walls of a 15'x15' room. Jealous? I don't get a spending allowance like someone here does, though.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    My desk wraps around 2 walls of a 15'x15' room. Jealous? I don't get a spending allowance like someone here does, though.

    :)

  • Options
    EtheaEthea Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    I really should take a picture of my current setup just annoy @bowen :p

    Ethea on
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    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    I was just informed that all of our support guys are being let go at the end of the year, developers are taking over after hours on call duty (I have no idea how support is going to happen during the day... I need to ask, I suspect developers again). On top of that, they have gotten rid of the company that used to handle the first level of support after hours before it went through to our on call person.

    I'm sure I haven't been told about the raise because they're still just figuring out how many 0s are getting added onto our salaries with all of this money they're saving and extra work for us.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Ethea wrote: »
    I really should take a picture of my current setup just annoy @bowen :p

    I wouldn't be opposed @Ethea I like to see that stuff even if I get jealous.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Jimmy King wrote: »
    I was just informed that all of our support guys are being let go at the end of the year, developers are taking over after hours on call duty (I have no idea how support is going to happen during the day... I need to ask, I suspect developers again). On top of that, they have gotten rid of the company that used to handle the first level of support after hours before it went through to our on call person.

    I'm sure I haven't been told about the raise because they're still just figuring out how many 0s are getting added onto our salaries with all of this money they're saving and extra work for us.

    Man that's silly, it's probably cheaper to keep those people on than to pay developers OT hours and on call pay. I don't think someone's realizing that, though. I'm figuring they're trying to see who they can keep on for free labor and won't bitch about it and look up compensation rights with the DoL.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    Ha. Pay OT hours. I know this ties pretty directly to the last couple of day's worth of talking, but trust me, at least initially there will be no OT pay. 1/2 day off for every week of on call is the current "compensation".

    But yes, I will be checking this out with DoL and also getting the fuck out if my base pay is not significantly bumped up on top of OT just because not only am I working more hours, they are after normal hours, it is new work that was not previously part of my job, and it's tedious shit that I've worked hard to not have to do. I'll always be on call at some level with the path my career has gone so far, but I should never be the first level of support unless that's a decision I consciously made and agreed to, such as working for a very small company.

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Yeah that's not even a halfway acceptable form of comp time for on call, last I checked. I think it's 1.25 hours per hour worked OT/on call. So, 3 days of on call time (16 hours a day), = 7.5 days of pay = a week of vacation.

    The FSLA says some things fall under exempt status and others not. For example, staying late to meet a deadline, is. On call, is not. And only some times staying late are. Not every day. Doubly so if you were never hired under the assumption you'd be on-call. Plus there's things like sleeper pay and all that that some states require (probably not yours).

    There are a lot of factors there.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    after just following along with the professor, listening to lectures, doing hello world! on the whiteboard under his guidance etc., we finally got out first 'assignment'. we have to write a basic interest calculating thing. ask the user "how much are you depositing?", "what is the interest rate?", and "how long until you withdrawal", then spit out the final balance.

    the only new 'thing' we're learning is the construct to put the user's input into something which we can then use

    i thought this would be like, a homework assignment

    turns out it's a major project spanning four class periods (2.25 hours each) lol

    jeez

  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Wow what. That's like... a lab assignment.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    Regex help again..
    <Location>0,0</Location>
    

    Easiest way to get rid of everything within (and including) the <>'s?

    </*> literally grabs it all (which makes sense).

  • Options
    Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    Unfortunately, based on http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17e_computer.pdf, the only way I could be more confident that my job does, unfortunately, qualify as exempt under FLSA is by talking directly to the DoL (and I probably will, just to be safe since I'm not at all happy with this change), a lawyer, or someone else in a very similar position who has already done those things.

    I'm paid well over that minimum and my primary duties are, at least currently, taking user requirements and then coming up with architecture and writing code to build new software from the ground up and will probably now be moving into taking user requirements and deisgning and implementing modifications to existing software.

    The guys who were doing the on call support almost certainly should not have been exempt, though.

  • Options
    Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2012
    Organichu wrote: »
    after just following along with the professor, listening to lectures, doing hello world! on the whiteboard under his guidance etc., we finally got out first 'assignment'. we have to write a basic interest calculating thing. ask the user "how much are you depositing?", "what is the interest rate?", and "how long until you withdrawal", then spit out the final balance.

    the only new 'thing' we're learning is the construct to put the user's input into something which we can then use

    i thought this would be like, a homework assignment

    turns out it's a major project spanning four class periods (2.25 hours each) lol

    jeez

    My experience at school was that only about half the people who attempt CS actually graduate, and only maybe a third of those can code without being handheld. But I went to a commuter satellite college so I can't speak to traditional situations.

    He's probably trying to weed out people who don't have the head for this sort of thing. Trust me, about the third year in things will get a lot more interesting.

    My first year CS prof was pretty awesome, but one of the assignments was really weird: We had to build a large number class implemented as linked lists of booleans. We had to support addition, subtraction, multiplication, and factorial. Addition was easy, subtraction was fine once I understood two's compliment, and factorial followed directly from multiplication, but I thought I was going to die trying to figure out the multiplication. I eventually implemented booth's algorithm that even kind of worked, but it was a mess.

    Monkey Ball Warrior on
    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Jimmy King wrote: »
    Unfortunately, based on http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17e_computer.pdf, the only way I could be more confident that my job does, unfortunately, qualify as exempt under FLSA is by talking directly to the DoL (and I probably will, just to be safe since I'm not at all happy with this change), a lawyer, or someone else in a very similar position who has already done those things.

    I'm paid well over that minimum and my primary duties are, at least currently, taking user requirements and then coming up with architecture and writing code to build new software from the ground up and will probably now be moving into taking user requirements and deisgning and implementing modifications to existing software.

    The guys who were doing the on call support almost certainly should not have been exempt, though.

    The problem is your specific job doesn't really facilitate on call. So you'd be exempt from something like 80 hours because of a deadline for a week. But longer than the week and you'd no longer be considered exempt. And on call isn't even considered part of that.

    Absolutely call them.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    edited September 2012
    There's some paper saying that between 30% and 60% fail the first CS class at some English university. Let me see if I can find a link...

    edit: linky (PDF)
    Learning to program is notoriously difficult. A substantial minority of students fails in every
    introductory programming course in every UK university. Despite heroic academic effort, the
    proportion has increased rather than decreased over the years. Despite a great deal of research
    into teaching methods and student responses, we have no idea of the cause.
    It has long been suspected that some people have a natural aptitude for programming, but
    until now there has been no psychological test which could detect it. Programming ability
    is not known to be correlated with age, with sex, or with educational attainment; nor has it
    been found to be correlated with any of the aptitudes measured in conventional ‘intelligence’ or
    ‘problem-solving-ability’ tests.

    Echo on
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