As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

[STEAM GREENLIGHT] New rules added, check the OP

1810121314

Posts

  • CuvisTheConquerorCuvisTheConqueror They always say "yee haw" but they never ask "haw yee?" Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Frem wrote: »
    Frem wrote: »
    That may be the most ignorant and uninformed rant I've ever read outside of right-wing political sites.

    Given that he has a game on Greenlight, it seems unlikely that he'd be uninformed about the feedback its denizens provide.

    That doesn't necessarily mean anything, especially since most of the actual comments on his Greenlight page are positive. It could be he's reading way too much into whatever "no" votes he's receiving. After all, it wouldn't be the first time somebody blamed their failure to break through commercially on their audience not being sophisticated enough to understand them.

    You don't have to travel very many pages into his comments to start seeing people who downvoted because "it looked like a phone game."

    I'm not denying that some gamers suck like that. What I object to is the idea they're the majority, and the idea that Greenlight is Steam's way to cater to them. Every community has its share of loud geese, but just because they're louder than the rest of us, doesn't mean they represent us. Valve's a secretive company, so I don't know how true it is, but I read somewhere that they don't even look at the number of no votes; only the number of yes votes.

    CuvisTheConqueror on
    xderwsaxganu.png
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Door Kickers is the latest game that everyone should go vote for on Greenlight because it looks fucking awesome.

    Oh, and one of the comments on the game's Greenlight page:
    The gameplay looks fine, and with emphasis in strategic actions this could be very interesting. I think that the graphics looks flash-like and amateur, but this is not a ,serious, problem if the gameplay is really good.
    But what I really, really, don´t like is the name of the game, sounds like you asked your 8yrs old boy for a name
    Anyway, I am upvoting

    Cute.

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
  • cooljammer00cooljammer00 Hey Small Christmas-Man!Registered User regular
    So is the backlash against "non-game" games like Depression Quest and I Get This Call Every Day on Greenlight due to perceived limited spaces available? Like, "Your non-game is taking the spot of the game I like on Greenlight".

    steam_sig.png

    3DS Friend Code: 2165-6448-8348 www.Twitch.TV/cooljammer00
    Battle.Net: JohnDarc#1203 Origin/UPlay: CoolJammer00
  • BrocksMulletBrocksMullet Into the sunrise, on a jet-ski. Natch.Registered User regular
    I don't understand why they just can't greenlight more games.

    I, for one, enjoyed the Mako.

    Steam: BrocksMullet http://steamcommunity.com/profiles/76561197972421669/


  • DonnictonDonnicton Registered User regular

    I guess it's sort of some unwritten law that Psychedelic games have to be accompanied by techno music.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    So is the backlash against "non-game" games like Depression Quest and I Get This Call Every Day on Greenlight due to perceived limited spaces available? Like, "Your non-game is taking the spot of the game I like on Greenlight".
    I think it's coming from a lot of places.

    Some people are hostile when presented with games that address serious issues and attempt to make social commentary because they perceive games as a content-free safe space for them to indulge their masculine power fantasies and call people gay without any repercussions. Games that look like they are going to make the medium "grow up" cause these people to be come defensive of their hobby, which they perceive of as under fire from a bunch of dumb artists who are going to ruin everything. Giving these games exposure on Steam would help them, and these people want these games to be strangled in the crib so that Call of Duty can be the exemplar of video games forever.

    Some people are simply exhibiting the perfectly normal but indescribably horrific human tendency to conservatism in every possible sphere, by which I mean they see games that are trying something new and interesting that other games don't try, and their response to this, like their response to everything they are not able to immediately recognize and slot into a preexisting part of their world-view, is that it is bad and wrong and needs to be shut down and stopped right now. These are the kind of people who use "weird" and "strange" and "different" as insults and who think the main way games need to innovate is to improve their graphics and come up with ways to put more iron sights onto your gun. From that game I just posted comes this comment (the first on the Greenlight page):
    SvOzn39.png
    BigRob154 is, thankfully, not the sort of knuckle-dragging halfwit I've described in the paragraph above, but he used to be one. He's evolved to the point where weird (or "wired") isn't always an insult. It's just sometimes an insult. In this case it isn't, and thus NOWHERE gets his approval. Hooray for BigRob154 and hooray for NOWHERE! Would that we were all as tolerant and open-minded as BigRob154.

    Some people think the graphics are bad. Like, really. If you read comments on those games a lot of people think Steam should not be selling games with bad graphics.

    Some people think "games" encompasses a very limited set of things, things that include Call of Duty and Sim City and Dragon Age and GRID 2 and Bioshock Infinite but not things like Depression Quest. They think Steam should only sell "games" as they define them so they downvote stuff like Depression Quest.

    Some people don't agree with the message behind games like I Get This Call Every Day or Depression Quest for a variety of reasons - they might be classist against call center workers or people with shitty jobs, and they don't want to hear narratives about that sort of stuff because they think talking about that stuff is worthless. Same goes for depression - they think depressed people just need to get over it and stop whining or something like this. In terms of other games that have messages, it's basically just either a lack of empathy or some more specific agenda (like "I hate feminists" or "I hate poor people" or something) that makes them resistant to these games.

    Some people think games need to be fun to be worth selling on Steam (and presumably they don't realize that they are wrong and that even if they are right, fun is subjective):
    EeaoT6r.png
    (This image and all the other ones below from "I Get This Call Every Day" Greenlight page)

    Try to figure out the reasons motivating these two downvotes:
    Tk6Ohsc.png

    Other people have more straightforward reasons:
    vyDnaMb.png

    By far one of the most common reasons to downvote a game is because it looks like a Flash game:
    Z7tywxg.png
    MsR61eJ.png

    There are probably other reasons but I think this covers like, 50% of the "no" votes at least. In fact it's probably higher. I'm pulling that number out of my ass.

    Personally, I vote "yes" on every game that looks like it has even a modicum of effort put into it, except I downvote anything that has scantily clad women for no reason other than the game's artist thinks women should show off as much skin as possible. Unless a game looks like it has some amazing features or something, skimpy women = sorry, I'm fed up with sexism and you can come ask for my Greenlight vote in the hypothetical future where the gaming industry isn't a morass of misogyny.

    Also sometimes I downvote things that seem like obvious attempts to bilk money out of the poor people who are psychologically susceptible to microtransactions. I don't downvote every F2P game but the ones that are meant to exploit people (the ones that make all their money from so called "whales") get down voted because those are basically life ruiners and the world doesn't need more of those.

    Aside from that though, basically everyone game on Greenlight gets an upvote from me.

    edit: I also downvote racist stuff but I'm not sure I've seen any yet.
    I don't understand why they just can't greenlight more games.
    Yeah. Like, why only let in 20 at a time or whatever? It's not like the next 80 in the top 100 are shit. There are plenty of games that are obviously good enough for Steam.

    TychoCelchuuu on
    LaCabraPartizanka
  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    I don't understand why they just can't greenlight more games.
    Yeah. Like, why only let in 20 at a time or whatever? It's not like the next 80 in the top 100 are shit. There are plenty of games that are obviously good enough for Steam.

    I wonder if it has to do with marketing exposure? 20 games being released in a batch, with an announcement to go with it, is a short enough list that anyone watching the news post can check out the full list for things they like without a major investment of time... if they dumped 100 games out at a time, I'm sure there're titles in there that'd get lost in the shuffle. Since Valve takes home a cut of the profit, it makes sense that they'd want each game to have enough exposure to sell.
    Also I'm sure there's *some* modicum of effort on part of a Valve employee that's still needed to vet the games and assist them to release (even if it is just pushing the "publish" button), so maybe it's just employee time/motivation limiting things.

    The way of the Newell is mysterious and esoteric.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    I don't know if this was common knowledge and I somehow missed it, but I had been under the impression that they greenlight the top 10/20 items in the top 100 every once in a while, and recently discovered that they don't; they just pick a bunch of games regardless of rank, and the top 100 just helps get things in front of them. A game could be ranked #80, or not be in the top 100, and still get in, but also a game could be #5 when 20 games get greenlit, and not be amoung them. I do not like this.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    LaCabra wrote: »
    I don't know if this was common knowledge and I somehow missed it, but I had been under the impression that they greenlight the top 10/20 items in the top 100 every once in a while, and recently discovered that they don't; they just pick a bunch of games regardless of rank, and the top 100 just helps get things in front of them. A game could be ranked #80, or not be in the top 100, and still get in, but also a game could be #5 when 20 games get greenlit, and not be amoung them. I do not like this.
    Yeah, Valve pretty much just picks whatever the fuck they want regardless of the votes, it seems like. It seems like Greenlight is a system for Valve to never have to deal with people who want games on Steam. It's a solution because everyone gets to sit in Greenlight purgatory until someone over at Valve goes "hey that game looks fun" and Greenlights it. Votes help you get noticed but other than that they mean nothing.

  • BrocksMulletBrocksMullet Into the sunrise, on a jet-ski. Natch.Registered User regular
    Does Valve have at least one person still dedicated to the vetting process?

    I, for one, enjoyed the Mako.

    Steam: BrocksMullet http://steamcommunity.com/profiles/76561197972421669/


  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Maybe there should just be no downvoting allowed? You don't have to vote "yes," but actively working against people who want to give a developer money is fucking internet trolling at its finest.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • CorpekataCorpekata Registered User regular
    Fairly certain they've said downvoting has no real relevance.

    LaCabraTychoCelchuuu
  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    Yeah downvoting doesn't do shit, just gets it out of your queue.

    TychoCelchuuu
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Although to be fair upvoting appears not to do very much either, so...

    LaCabra
  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    237th day in the top 100, wdup.

    TychoCelchuuutestsubject23MaddocTeeMan
  • CorpekataCorpekata Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    I wonder if they're taking into account voting patterns. Someone like me that votes yes on anything that doesn't look like a 12 year old made probably doesn't give good feedback. Or a ton of sudden votes for some meme game like that Surgeon stuff or the Angry Video Game Nerd game. Comment activity, that sort of thing.

    Corpekata on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Corpekata wrote: »
    I wonder if they're taking into account voting patterns. Someone like me that votes yes on anything that doesn't look like a 12 year old made probably doesn't give good feedback. Or a ton of sudden votes for some meme game like that Surgeon stuff or the Angry Video Game Nerd game. Comment activity, that sort of thing.
    I think what they're mostly taking into account is:

    1) Is the game steampunk?
    2) Does the game have Slenderman?
    3) Does someone at Valve just happen to like the game for some reason?
    4) Any zombies?

    If the answer is "yes" then the game gets approved. If the answer is "no" then basically if you're near the very top of the list sometimes they choose you.

  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    Meanwhile, organising your game to get on basically any other similar service takes maybe a day.

    TychoCelchuuu
  • SumanaiSumanai muh PTRegistered User regular
    Modern day Road Rash? Yes, please! Check out Road Redemption. The trailer is probably scripted but it still looks awesome.

    camo_sig2.png
  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    I finally got invited to the Greenlight Dev Steam group - before now that'd been impossible to do without paying the $100, even if you submitted your game before that was a thing. There's some interesting discussion in there where a couple of Valve guys are taking part in a lot of discussions. A lot of what I've read has been elaborate stats analysis where the stats are being used pretty effectively by both sides of every argument to prove opposing points, but also there's new facts being revealed to me, like:
    -most of the games in the last lot approved were below the top 50
    -while I thought it was pretty bad that InFlux had gone up on day one (239 days, whoop), never been below #80, and wasn't close to being approved, there's at least one other guy in the same position only he's never been below #40
    -The reason for Steam not switching to a more app-store-like model where they accept more or less everybody and you just fend for yourself (desirable or not depending on who you talk to) is apparently that Valve just doesn't have the manpower. I dunno, man. Then again, Apple apparently don't have the manpower to keep their Developer Portal running over Christmas.

    Here is a post I made on there.
    I only found out from Steam-chatting with Chet a few days ago that the games that get Greenlit aren't necessarily the top 10/20 at the time. I'd totally assumed that they were; maybe it's the giant "#70 of 1216", implying that's our position along a path that leads, eventually, to publication. Everyone I know had this same assumption, so there's a bit of a communication problem there, maybe.

    I'm not sure how to feel about it. On the one hand it might be good for Steam to be more manually curated than just slicing off the top 10% once in a while. On the other, a lot of press picked it up as a democratisation of the selection process, which it's not, which I think has lead to confusion.
    Pre-Greenlight, there were a lot of applications that were ignored by Steam or turned down with little explanation - "doesn't seem like Steam material", etc - and that'd be it, you'd just never get to be on Steam or be able to find out why. One advantage of Greenlight, I'd thought, was that that couldn't happen anymore. Now it seems like it totally could - for all I know, you guys have looked at my game, mentally assigned it a "nope" label, and I'm continuing to promote the Greenlight page in vain. Maybe that's unlikely or impossible, but the system isn't transparent enough for us to tell.

    I imagine this Gabe quote gets hurled at you more often than you'd like, but it's relevant, and makes some of us feel like we're contending with an acknowledged-as-bad system as a stopgap until something new comes along and gives us a Valve Time definition of "pretty quickly":
    "Greenlight is a bad example of an election process. We came to the conclusion pretty quickly that we could just do away with Greenlight completely, because it was a bottleneck rather than a way for people to communicate choice". -Gabe Newell.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    IndieGames.com asks: Is Greenlight Working? Sort of. That title is slightly misleading. It's mostly about one developer's experience.

  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    While I can understand his frustration and I empathize, what he's going through isn't uncommon for people seeking publishing. While he had a wonderful experience with Nintendo, I doubt this is the norm in gaming and certainly isn't within the entertainment industry at large. When I was a working professional musician nearly every rejection I ever received came with no criticisms, suggestion or anything else that could be considered helpful. It's not their job to help everyone out. Usually all you get is just a big not interested. From what I've read about publishing novels it's much the same there.

    It's a cold, harsh experience but it's not unusual or what I'd consider a bad practice or rude.

    BrocksMullet
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Given that Steam has a near monopoly on digital distribution, though, it's much crazier to be rejected with no comments from the one storefront that makes or breaks your business than it is to be rejected by whoever.

    LaCabra
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    Steam isn't responsible for this guys livelihood. Hell, he's already been published on a Nintendo system. That's more success than 99.9% (this statistic is pulled straight out of my butt, of course) of developers will ever see.

    It sucks his feelings are hurt and he's not raking in bucket loads of cash from Steam sales, but being on Steam is no guarantee of success either. At least with the Greenlight system he does receive tons of feedback that he can act on in the future. That's fairly unique and very cool.

    Drake on
  • CorpekataCorpekata Registered User regular
    It's depressing knowing we're getting Angry Video Game Nerd The Game before Mutant Mudds.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    But can you think of any better reasons for Steam to reject his game other than "they can do whatever they feel like?" Because Steam could disable your account if it felt like it (this has happened to a few people by mistake, even) but that doesn't mean it should. Just because Steam is well within its rights to be a dick to developers who want to sell their game doesn't mean it makes sense for a game that's been in the top 100 of Greenlight for basically forever to languish for no good reason.

    LaCabra
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    Steam/Valve isn't being a dick. They are just doing business. I seriously doubt anyone at Valve has looked at the Greenlight for Mutant Mudds and made a decision based on anything other than what they think is good for Valve. Whether or not they are making the correct decision is up for debate of course. But to perceive malice where there almost certainly is none isn't smart business either.

    Drake on
  • Death of RatsDeath of Rats Registered User regular
    But can you think of any better reasons for Steam to reject his game other than "they can do whatever they feel like?" Because Steam could disable your account if it felt like it (this has happened to a few people by mistake, even) but that doesn't mean it should. Just because Steam is well within its rights to be a dick to developers who want to sell their game doesn't mean it makes sense for a game that's been in the top 100 of Greenlight for basically forever to languish for no good reason.

    Actually, looking at gameplay videos for that game, it seems to me it hasn't gotten on Steam purely because it's a giant throwback to old school console platformers, and doesn't do anything really new or interesting with the formula. It's just competently done. Even the Zeboid games do something interesting with the old school RPG formula, making them ridiculously fast paced.

    Can't really say Steam is being a dick to him when they don't allow him on their service. It's not like it's done with any malice.

    No I don't.
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Drake wrote: »
    Steam/Valve isn't being a dick. They are just doing business. I seriously doubt anyone at Valve has looked at the Greenlight for Mutant Mudds and made a decision based on anything other than what they think is good for Valve. Whether or not they are making the correct decision is up for debate of course. But to perceive malice where there almost certainly is none isn't smart business either.
    I'm not saying there's malice, I'm saying there's no reason for Valve not to pick lower rated games off of Greenlight over that game, and really there's no reason for Valve not to put a lot of other games on Greenlight onto Steam, and since they have more or less a monopoly on PC digital distribution it's kind of mean to arbitrarily not give people chances becuase nobody at Valve gives enough of a shit about Mutant Mudds or InFlux to Greenlight them. It's pretty dickish to say "oh, you're one of the top rated games on Steam Greenlight? That's cool but we're going to greenlight a lot of other lower rated games just because we have a crush on those developers or something. Yeah your game is already done but actually it's really important we greenlight some unfinished games instead."
    Actually, looking at gameplay videos for that game, it seems to me it hasn't gotten on Steam purely because it's a giant throwback to old school console platformers, and doesn't do anything really new or interesting with the formula. It's just competently done. Even the Zeboid games do something interesting with the old school RPG formula, making them ridiculously fast paced.
    This would be a better point if Steam wasn't already full of throwbacks to old school console platformers.

  • Death of RatsDeath of Rats Registered User regular
    Drake wrote: »
    Steam/Valve isn't being a dick. They are just doing business. I seriously doubt anyone at Valve has looked at the Greenlight for Mutant Mudds and made a decision based on anything other than what they think is good for Valve. Whether or not they are making the correct decision is up for debate of course. But to perceive malice where there almost certainly is none isn't smart business either.
    I'm not saying there's malice, I'm saying there's no reason for Valve not to pick lower rated games off of Greenlight over that game, and really there's no reason for Valve not to put a lot of other games on Greenlight onto Steam, and since they have more or less a monopoly on PC digital distribution it's kind of mean to arbitrarily not give people chances becuase nobody at Valve gives enough of a shit about Mutant Mudds or InFlux to Greenlight them. It's pretty dickish to say "oh, you're one of the top rated games on Steam Greenlight? That's cool but we're going to greenlight a lot of other lower rated games just because we have a crush on those developers or something. Yeah your game is already done but actually it's really important we greenlight some unfinished games instead."
    Actually, looking at gameplay videos for that game, it seems to me it hasn't gotten on Steam purely because it's a giant throwback to old school console platformers, and doesn't do anything really new or interesting with the formula. It's just competently done. Even the Zeboid games do something interesting with the old school RPG formula, making them ridiculously fast paced.
    This would be a better point if Steam wasn't already full of throwbacks to old school console platformers.

    Most of which actually do something interesting with the genre. Add to the fact that maybe those old school platformer throwbacks just don't sell well on Steam, even the more interesting ones.

    I can understand why Valve is extremely picky when choosing new games/developers to allow on Steam. It protects it from being the Google play store or the Apple store.

    You're really trying to project some form of negative intent onto Valve for what they pick. Just seems a little overblown to me.

    No I don't.
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    Drake wrote: »
    Steam/Valve isn't being a dick. They are just doing business. I seriously doubt anyone at Valve has looked at the Greenlight for Mutant Mudds and made a decision based on anything other than what they think is good for Valve. Whether or not they are making the correct decision is up for debate of course. But to perceive malice where there almost certainly is none isn't smart business either.

    I'm not saying there's malice, I'm saying there's no reason for Valve not to pick lower rated games off of Greenlight over that game, and really there's no reason for Valve not to put a lot of other games on Greenlight onto Steam, and since they have more or less a monopoly on PC digital distribution it's kind of mean to arbitrarily not give people chances becuase nobody at Valve gives enough of a shit about Mutant Mudds or InFlux to Greenlight them. It's pretty dickish to say "oh, you're one of the top rated games on Steam Greenlight? That's cool but we're going to greenlight a lot of other lower rated games just because we have a crush on those developers or something. Yeah your game is already done but actually it's really important we greenlight some unfinished games instead."

    We're generally agreeing as far as personal preference goes. I think Mutant Mudds should get the Greenlight before another FPS with zombies and all that stuff too. It's the kind of game I'd like to see on Steam, and I've given them an upvote, I follow them and I'll help them out how I can. I've purchased the game on Desura for example.

    I think I'm seeing a bit of a disconnect in what you are saying though. You start out stating that you aren't saying it's malice, but before the paragraph is over you are describing Valve as being mean and acting dickish. Is it arbitrary? Almost definitely in the end. And when it comes down to it, publishing decisions in general are arbitrary. It needs to be too, because Valve probably shouldn't turn their marketplace entirely over to a new automated and user driven system. We've all seen how end-users have exploited just about everything Valve has done in the public space with sales contests and ARGs. To expect a different kind of experience with Greenlight would be begging to burn the service down in my opinion.

    I see Greenlight as a work in progress, and this is pretty new territory as far as business practices go. Perhaps one day Greenlight will be the open and democratic system that we'd all love to see, Valve included from some of their statements I've read. We're at the start of this experiment, and we don't even know if it'll succeed in the long run. I have high hopes for it though, and they aren't dashed yet. While the way the process is working doesn't live up to Greenlight's promise and future potential at this moment, I think Valve is probably doing the right thing by perhaps running this conservatively to start.



    Drake on
    Geth
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    It just doesn't make sense to me that stuff like Bad Rats and The War Z and Gettysburg: Armored Warfare should end up on Steam whereas perfectly good games shouldn't, because of the capricious and arbitrary system Valve has said up. Steam shouldn't be like the App Store or like the Google Play store? Why? Because those stores sell shitty games? So does Steam!

    BrocksMullet
  • BrocksMulletBrocksMullet Into the sunrise, on a jet-ski. Natch.Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    It just shouldn't be this hard.
    Do you look interesting/fun? Yes.
    Is your game broken? No.

    Greenlight!

    Is the process of puting a game on steam just much more resource intensive than I thought?

    BrocksMullet on
    I, for one, enjoyed the Mako.

    Steam: BrocksMullet http://steamcommunity.com/profiles/76561197972421669/


    TychoCelchuuu
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    It just shouldn't be this hard.
    Do you look interesting/fun? Yes.
    Is your game broken? No.

    Greenlight!

    Is the process of puting a game on steam just more more resource intensive than I thought?
    It's not trivial (Valve probably checks to make sure the game isn't going to install a trojan on everyone's computer for instance). But there's no reason for Valve to not publish successful Wii games that are ready to go or something like InFlux by our own @LaCabra who has actually met Gabe Newell in person because even that is not enough for Valve to say "yes your game is obviously good why not stick it on Steam along with the 4 Slenderman games and the 3 Steampunk games that we recenly Greenlit."

    LaCabra
  • BrocksMulletBrocksMullet Into the sunrise, on a jet-ski. Natch.Registered User regular
    I suspect the reason games can't get vetted is the same reason Steam has non-existent customer service-- Because of Valves freeform structure, it's not really anyones job, no one wants to do it, and therefore it doesn't get done, except between other things.

    I, for one, enjoyed the Mako.

    Steam: BrocksMullet http://steamcommunity.com/profiles/76561197972421669/


    DrakeLaCabra
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Man Valve should just hire me. I'd do that shit. Boring jobs aren't boring when you're helping people!

    Drake
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    It just doesn't make sense to me that stuff like Bad Rats and The War Z and Gettysburg: Armored Warfare should end up on Steam whereas perfectly good games shouldn't, because of the capricious and arbitrary system Valve has said up. Steam shouldn't be like the App Store or like the Google Play store? Why? Because those stores sell shitty games? So does Steam!

    Like I said earlier I completely empathize. I've personally known tons of musicians that should have had a shot before any of the crapfests like Astroman 2000 or whoever. I agree that from my perspective many Greenlight decisions make no sense at all. I also know that when you are in that position your perspective is very different, for a variety of reasons. Most of these reasons make perfect sense and some of them are just human frailty or bureaucratic inefficiencies.

    Just the fact that Valve has embarked on this Greenlight experiment is a huge deal though. It's an outreach that is unprecedented by any publisher of any kind I've any knowledge of. It's virgin territory in many ways, so there will be growing pains, inequities and various problems and tensions. Can Greenlight be better? Definitely. Should it be better? Definitely. Is it going to get there in the space of months? No way, no how. The best we can hope for is that Valve doesn't lose sight of the goal for this project and continues to steer it towards that. One thing that will kill this though is if developers buy into a perception that this relationship is adversarial, either between the developer and Valve or between the developer and the Steam user base. That will poison this just as surely as malice and ill intent from Valve would.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    If a publisher could book every musician at minimal cost then I'd be much angrier at good musicians being turned down than I am right now.

    LaCabraMaddoc
  • MaddocMaddoc I'm Bobbin Threadbare, are you my mother? Registered User regular
    I have trouble swallowing any rationale for any functional game being turned away from the Steam storefront when they sell games which are literally broken and do not run. Or worse they do run but they were developed by Tale of Tales, or something.

    97H9G7S.png PSN - Masked Unit | FFXIV - Laitarne Gilgamesh
    LaCabraDrake
Sign In or Register to comment.