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[STEAM GREENLIGHT] New rules added, check the OP

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Posts

  • I needed anime to post.I needed anime to post. boom Registered User regular
    i would greatly like a copy of Cook, Serve, Delicious! on steam and i am upset at its continued absence

    TeeMan
  • ElbasunuElbasunu Registered User regular
    I still can rarely bring myself to buy without steam keys. Those services are probably great, but I've never been a huge fan keeping track of multiple access points. This means I often lose out in the thrift department :\

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    Steam ID: Obos Vent: Obos
  • Anon the FelonAnon the Felon In bat country.Registered User regular
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    I still can rarely bring myself to buy without steam keys. Those services are probably great, but I've never been a huge fan keeping track of multiple access points. This means I often lose out in the thrift department :\

    Indeed sir, it is the only code by which I lead my life.

    Give me Steam, or give me death.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Ignore Desura at your own peril. There are a lot of great indie games only available there, it has one click install for mods for your Steam games, it's easier to keep track of as an access point than Steam is because you don't have to enter codes as often... Desura is straight up better than Steam when it comes to everything except range of selection. If you play anything other than AAA blockbusters then Desura is much easier than downloading installers yourself. Something like Escape Goat, which is holed up on Greenlight, is already on Desura and well worth a look, not to mention all the free mods and stuff.

    Maybe I should make a Desura thread sometime soon actually.

    Draketestsubject23
  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    Desura really does fill in a gap that Steam doesn't reach - it's great for more fringe titles, indie games, etc. Much of what Greenlight has to offer is already available from Desura, for example.
    I find the UI for Desura to be a lot less polished, though, and their search feature is a joke (it's just a Google site search). It pretty much matches the kind of software it offers - indie quality stuff, lacking in the budget & quality of the major studios, but with rare gems that you won't find elsewhere.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    While Desura may not have as many slick features as Steam, the basic functionality of the client is great. Purchases are straightforward, and I vastly prefer the way Desura handles updating the games in the library. You get an update available notification icon in the list next to the game. You click on the icon and you are presented with a changelog for the update. Then finally you decide whether or not to update the game. I imagine this would be especially nice for people on connections with bandwidth caps.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Desura's search is actually better than Steam's, I find - I can literally type the name of a game into Steam and not get it in the search results because of weird voodoo or punctuation or something. It's super frustrating.

    Vi Monks
  • BlindPsychicBlindPsychic Registered User regular
    The name basically has to be 100% correct or it won't be able to find it.

  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    That's odd. I never seem to have a problem with searches in Steam. Though I *am* lazy, and only type a likely keyword / part of the title.
    And I'm sure Desura's Google-based search works, but it is ugly-assed and amateur compared to having a proper integrated search, at least in my opinion.
    Still <3 for Desura, though - if not for that service I'd have missed out on games like NEO Scavanger and Blindside, just to name a couple.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Desura's search pops up games while you type stuff in, so if you don't like the ugliness, then click the game instead of searching for real.

    Also just to search something I searched Blindside and ran into this gem of a comment:

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  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    LOL, that's my humour quotient for the day.
    Nearly fell out of my chair.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
  • RoyceSraphimRoyceSraphim Registered User regular
    I will try desura after I beat Jagged Alliance 2, I currently own Drassen and Omerta......this could take a while.

  • seabassseabass Doctor MassachusettsRegistered User regular
    Has anyone tried miasmata? I'm pretty excited for it, but also worried because I've heard that even the recommended specs won't let you play it smoothly.

    Run you pigeons, it's Robert Frost!
  • ElbasunuElbasunu Registered User regular
    I just noticed Against the Wall is up on Greenlight for voting. I've loved what I've seen from it, and I got a chance to speak to the developer at PAX East last year in the "Kickstarter" room. The core concept is pretty great, and you can play the alpha right now on the games website(download, or unity player)

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    Steam ID: Obos Vent: Obos
  • SumanaiSumanai muh PTRegistered User regular

    What did I just read? Was he trying to make a point about something? Because if he was I missed it completely.

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  • heenatoheenato Alice Leywind Registered User regular
    Sumanai wrote: »

    What did I just read? Was he trying to make a point about something? Because if he was I missed it completely.
    I THINK his point is "Greenlight has failed because people are downvoting anything that isn't call of duty"

    I'm not too sure, but I think that might be it. It actually is really hard to tell.

    M A G I K A Z A M
  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Kinda read like sour grapes to me. I mean sure, there's a certain amount of people doing what he says, but also check out some of the stuff that has been greenlighted. It's not like weird experimental stuff isn't getting through or little projects that merit attention aren't getting noticed. When it comes down to it, we have no idea how Valve weights a downvote. People are allowed to participate in whatever capacity they choose within limits, and if there's a certain pathetic segment of vocal idiots who look at this as some kind of holy duty to defend real gaming then whatever. I don't think they are really having a whole lot of impact on the process.

    Drake on
    testsubject23
  • LaCabraLaCabra MelbourneRegistered User regular
    As far as I can tell downvotes really don't affect anything, which if it's the case seems like it sort of defeats Rob's point, unless I'm missing it also.

    If anyone's curious, here's the full amount of stats you get access to when you've got a game on Greenlight. Pic taken a few weeks ago:

    8431676100_e561a1ed15_b.jpg

    Interesting point: it looks like we have a pretty stupid amount of downvotes but it turns out we have only 2% or something more than the average for a top 50 game.

    DrakeCommander ZoomDarmakMaddoc
  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    That blog post is odd - I genuinely can't tell if he's bemoaning the practice of "gatekeeping" on Greenlight, or if he's fond of it... I suspect the former.

    I'm of two minds on the subject - on the one hand, I'm very fond of innovation in games, and many of my favorite titles are indie games or games with experimental aspects to them, which often don't reach the kind of commercial success that major titles get. When I browse Greenlight, it's primarily these little gems I'm keeping an eye out for, and it'd be a shame of the hardcore gamer set blindly rejected them based simply on the fact that they're unconventional.
    I suspect that this isn't the case - unique and interesting titles tend to get noticed, in my experience, and there're enough non-CoD players to get these things some attention.

    On the other hand... I think about where I'm shopping, and why I'm shopping there. I go to Steam to buy good games (often at bone-cutting sale prices, but I buy them nonetheless), from a vendor I trust. So far, Valve has done a pretty good job of keeping the utter crap away from Steam (with a couple of exceptions, obviously). But Greenlight is absolutely glutted with what I'd unforgivingly call mediocrity.

    Beyond the titles that are just crap, there's a massive number of titles that just aren't noteworthy for anything. They may not be bad games, but they're not great either. And they're all struggling for digital shelf space next to the AAA titles we get on Steam. For that reason, I'd contend that, yes, some of these games "don't belong on Steam". This isn't just a question of "more is merrier" - Steam needs to be able to maintain it's user experience, and part of that experience is being able to find games worth owning, without going through the onerous process of wading through page after page of hum-drum "retro platformers", "old-school RPGs" with graphics done in MS paint, or "atmospheric horror adventure" games without any tension or fear to offer.

    So yes, some of these games simply don't have the quality or polish, or excellence of concept to warrant a place in Steam's offerings. These games may be fine in their own right, and I probably wouldn't bat an eye if I saw them up for sale on Desura or GamersGate, but to see them on Steam would be jarring and wrong.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    On the other hand... I think about where I'm shopping, and why I'm shopping there. I go to Steam to buy good games (often at bone-cutting sale prices, but I buy them nonetheless), from a vendor I trust. So far, Valve has done a pretty good job of keeping the utter crap away from Steam (with a couple of exceptions, obviously). But Greenlight is absolutely glutted with what I'd unforgivingly call mediocrity.
    Ah, yes, Steam, the wonderful garden paradise storefront filled only with good games: And I could keep going with dozens of more examples. Even GOG.com, the website that used to explicitly have "Good" in its title, doesn't only sell good games.

    BrocksMulletDrake
  • BrocksMulletBrocksMullet Into the sunrise, on a jet-ski. Natch.Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    "Kingpin. It certainly was a videogame."

    I actually find the whole voting process heartbreaking at this point. There are so many good looking games that obviously have been made with a lot of love, that I'm not personally interested in, but still want to see succeed. I can't up-vote them, though, because I don't want to cancel out my support for the games I'd actually buy.

    It feels like smoothering puppies because there's not enough food.

    BrocksMullet on
    I, for one, enjoyed the Mako.

    Steam: BrocksMullet http://steamcommunity.com/profiles/76561197972421669/


  • One Thousand CablesOne Thousand Cables An absence of thought Registered User regular
    Plenty of mediocrity makes it onto Steam separate from Greenlight. You don't have to look very far in the new releases tab to find games that look more at home in your Greenlight queue.

    I don't know, I've been finding Greenlight to be more and more of a bummer as time goes on. Sure, interesting stuff does make it through (Kentucky Route Zero), but for every Kentucky Route Zero there's probably a dozen games like Cook, Serve, Delicious that languish in the Greenlight process with no end in sight. Right now, the service only really serves as an inefficient bottleneck, given the rate of approval.

  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    All of this voting through our accounts makes it easy for Valve to track all kinds of trends and data and compile that with what they know about us and our buying habits. As far as I know the process that Valve uses and what data they use in their decision making for Greenlight titles is largely unknown. I bet there's more at work here than a simple up and down voting process, and knowing Valve they are probably keeping things pretty fluid behind the scenes. Also they've shown a willingness to move in the most egregious cases like WarZ.

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Plenty of mediocrity makes it onto Steam separate from Greenlight. You don't have to look very far in the new releases tab to find games that look more at home in your Greenlight queue.

    I don't know, I've been finding Greenlight to be more and more of a bummer as time goes on. Sure, interesting stuff does make it through (Kentucky Route Zero), but for every Kentucky Route Zero there's probably a dozen games like Cook, Serve, Delicious that languish in the Greenlight process with no end in sight. Right now, the service only really serves as an inefficient bottleneck, given the rate of approval.
    KRZ didn't even make it in through Greenlight. It got fast-tracked to Steam because all IGF finalists get on Steam. KRZ was on Greenlight before that, so Valve just said "welp here's a Greenlight game that got approved" but it didn't get approved through votes.

  • Undead ScottsmanUndead Scottsman Registered User regular
    Did we ever find out how the fuck Bad Rats got onto Steam?

  • BloodySlothBloodySloth Registered User regular
    Dark, dark magicks.

  • DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    I'm sure photographs and DNA traces were involved.

  • testsubject23testsubject23 King of No Sleep ZzzzzzzRegistered User regular
    Did we ever find out how the fuck Bad Rats got onto Steam?

    Let me tell you the story of Arthur Merton...
    Arthur Merton was Director of Product Selection at Valve from early 2008 to mid 2009. He was a quiet man, and his high strung disposition made him, as time would prove, unsuitable for his job role. Beginning at Valve with his "dream job" in 2008, Arthur was solely responsible for the selection of which games would be released on Steam, and which would not. At first his enthusiasm held, and he vetted each title with careful attention to detail, and as much impartiality as he could while still ensuring only quality products made it onto our beloved platform.

    He worked endless hours, evenings, weekends, chasing big name publishers, playing a never ending queue of game demos, and dodging crazed indie programmers eager for a venue for their titles. Some nights he slept at the office, too exhausted to make the 2 hour commute back home. He missed his family, but he had his calling, a sacred duty that he alone had been entrusted with. The games must flow!

    By July 2009, things had reached their nadir for Mr. Merton. Sleepless nights had taken their toll, and he had started drinking heavily to cope with the stress of all those games waiting for his scrutiny. His wife served him with divorce papers the previous month, and moved quietly out of their house, taking the children. Arthur now rented a small bachelor apartment, just around the corner from the Valve offices, though he still slept at the office - when he slept - more often than not.

    It was during a particularly nasty bender, frustrated and despairing, that Arthur met Antonio, a Brazilian nihilist and estranged programmer, who was also at rock bottom. The two struck an odd friendship of slurred and angry misanthropy, agreeing that life was shit, games were shit, and people were no better than rats. Through their drunken haze, a plan took form between them, a plan to take their revenge against an uncaring and terrible world. They would make the worst game ever played by human hands. A game so bad as to transcend mere unpleasantness and strike straight for the player's very soul, crippling their bright and vital center, robbing them of life and hope, the way that Arthur and Antonio had been.

    For days the duo worked feverishly, Antonio pounding out reams of buggy code while Arthur scoured his lifetime of gaming experiences for the most frustrating, punishing, hair-tearing game mechanics ever devised. At the end of a week, they had something. It ran poorly, was almost impossible to finish, and every second of it was an agony to the user. It was perfect! But before they could release their Frankenstein's monster on the world, they needed to test it... They needed a third party.

    This third party would turn out to be Mitchel Gower, one of the junior testing team at Valve. He was told they wanted to run a game by him, to check it for quality - normally something that was Arthur's purview, but Mitchel was junior staff and was eager to help out. They put him in front of a PC in the testing lab, fired up their game, and left Mitchel to make his appraisal. When they returned several hours later, Mitchel Gower was dead, strangled with his own shoe laces. There was a note in Wordpad on his screen, with just a single word, in a 72 point bright red font: "WHY?"

    Mitchel's death caused a schism between Arthur and Antonio. Arthur was horrified to behold what they had wrought. During development, their sinister purpose was a mere undercurrent to the matters at hand, but to see their product in its final state and the savagery it was capable of producing shook Arthur's resolve. He wanted to abandon the plan, burn the game onto a single CD-ROM and hide it away somewhere the world would never find it. Antonio would not hear of it, though. To him, the tester's unfortunate demise was a success beyond his wild imaginings. Their twisted revenge was so much more potent, so much more masterful than he had expected. His desire to unleash it upon the world, to cause suffering and death, only increased.

    The duo fought over their newly galvanized opinions, first with words, then with fists, and finally bottles, furniture, and Arthur's laptop. When the haze of rage and fear had abated, Antonio lay dead, his skull crushed by Arthur's sturdy notebook frame. Horrified by what he had done, Arthur fled the scene, taking the only disc containing their game, and setting fire to Antonio's slummy loft on his way out the door. In a panic, and only semi-lucid, Arthur made his way back to the office, where he intended to "lose" the disc in Valve's monstrous warehouse of rejected games - somewhere no human being would ever look for it.

    Some brief madness or intuition, however, made Arthur stop at his office, where he sank into his chair, fingering the disc in his hands and trying desperately to collect his broken thoughts. By habit, he checked his voice mail. One message from a publisher, with another deadline slipped. One from a hopeful indie developer about a game he could no longer remember. And a message from his wife. She had met someone, the message stated, they were happy together and she wanted only two thing from him now: their divorce finalized, and to never see him again.

    Sobbing, Arthur opened the desk drawer where he kept the whiskey, to discover a carefully folded, handwritten note from Antonio, his dead friend's cursive glaring up at him, "To Arthur". Shakily, Arthur extracted the note and read its contents. "Arthur", it began, "I know you have had your doubts and your moments of shame, but I beg you to stay with our plan. This world is shit, remember? Let these ignorant rats wallow in ours, let it overwhelm and destroy them all. I have done nothing worthwhile with my life until now. Let the terror of our mediocrity burn in their minds for a thousand generations. I spit on this filthy reality."

    Crumpling the note, and weakly dropping it into the wastebasket, Arthur scooped up the disc containing the worst game in human creation. He stared at it for a while, almost reverently, the way one gazes with awe upon an atomic bomb, with a mixture of fear and compulsion, before setting it gently into the tray of his computer. His fingers fumbled numbly across the keyboard, bringing up the interface for the Steam store registry, keying in the information he and Antonio had carefully created in their mad quest for vengeance against the whole world. When it was done he poured himself a full glass of whisky, drained it, and clicked the "upload" button.

    It was done. Their Kraken had been released. Soon, unsuspecting users would find and download it. A few at first, but more and more would be drawn in by the low cost, and the trustworthiness of Valve's good name. In a while - days, perhaps weeks - the game would have infected thousands, burning away their will to live like so much candle wax. It was finally done.

    Straightening himself up, Arthur drained the bottle of whiskey and, walking tall for the first time in so many years, stumbled back to his tiny apartment, where he hung himself quietly in the dark. The note left on his computer screen consisted of a single phrase, in a 72 point bright red font: "I'M SO SORRY."

    And that's the story of how Bad Rats got onto Steam.
    I mean, it's all made up, but it could've happened that way. We'll never know.

    camo_sig2.png
    Steam: Chaos Introvert | Twitch.tv: Chaos_Introvert | R*SC: Chaos_Introvert | PSN: testsubject23
    DrakeBrocksMulletDrovekCuvisTheConquerorMrVyngaardRoyceSraphimTheKoolEagleBig ClassyBroncbuster
  • InkSplatInkSplat 100%ed Bad Rats. Registered User regular
    So, I mentioned this over in the Steam thread, but figure I should post it up where it actually belongs.

    http://www.pcgamer.com/2013/03/15/frozen-endzone-interview/

    Mode 7, the makers of Frozen Synapse, are taking the system used there to create a simultaneous robot football game. Which is awesome.

    It featured randomized terrain and unit placement, along with different classes of "players", all controlled just like Frozen Synapse.

    Not sure why they're needing to go through Greenlight, since Frozen Synapse is already on Steam and even used Steam login, but, whatever.

    They're going to be doing what they did for Frozen Synapse, which was a beta for preorders and then tweaking he game based on community feedback.

    Overall, I am super excited. Only bad bit is the 2014 release date. :(

    Origin for Dragon Age: Inquisition Shenanigans: Inksplat776
    DrovekDarmak
  • CuvisTheConquerorCuvisTheConqueror They always say "yee haw" but they never ask "haw yee?" Registered User regular
    That may be the most ignorant and uninformed rant I've ever read outside of right-wing political sites.

    xderwsaxganu.png
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Well, it's British so their steam is older than ours.

    I wish I could say that was a joke column, but I don't think it was. I'm sure there's some of that - downvoting - going on, but not to the extent he implies so not sure what the intent is.

  • TeeManTeeMan BrainSpoon Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    Can we talk about Underrail? I think we should all talk about Underrail.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blE0XJWUxpY

    It has a demo.

    Your snap judgement to it's likeness with Fallout and Fallout 2 are warranted - it plays a lot like them. The really good parts are the new things it brings to the formula, such as crafting from scavenged blue-prints, timed perks (such as using "Aimed shot" for critical damage, but only once every three turns), dedicated movement action points so you can still move out of LOS before the end of your turn etc.

    And the conversation trees are quite like them in many ways too, for example: Upon retrieving a lost item for a character, he thanks me and says that he'll trade it back for either an SMG, a health stim or some leather boots. I opt to ask for them all. Incredulous, he asks if I'm serious. I tell him yes, all or nothing old timer. He glowers at me and tells me to get out of his sight and no items are exchanged, but the mission is deemed complete.

    I LOVE that that's an option, to just be a jerk to your own detriment. I even talked sass to my marksman instructor and he walked across the map and punched me in the stomach, losing me over half my health!


    With the recent resurgence with Infinity Engine inspired games getting Kickstarted, I really hope this game doesn't end up being ignored into obscurity, because from the ~5 hours I've played of the demo has really impressed me so far. The guy (I think it's a one-man development) is going the way of Alpha funding, so the latest build and the final game together can be bought for $10

    TeeMan on
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    RoyceSraphim
  • TeriferinTeriferin Registered User regular
    Underrail looks fantastic. I'll definitely be voting that up.

    teriferin#1625
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Frozen Endzone is up on Greenlight and if it doesn't get Greenlit I'll be sad. This game is going to own.

    Zxerol
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    That may be the most ignorant and uninformed rant I've ever read outside of right-wing political sites.

    Given that he has a game on Greenlight, it seems unlikely that he'd be uninformed about the feedback its denizens provide.

    Frem on
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Could've sworn this was posted before, but: an article on Depression Quest and Greenlight.

  • CuvisTheConquerorCuvisTheConqueror They always say "yee haw" but they never ask "haw yee?" Registered User regular
    Frem wrote: »
    That may be the most ignorant and uninformed rant I've ever read outside of right-wing political sites.

    Given that he has a game on Greenlight, it seems unlikely that he'd be uninformed about the feedback its denizens provide.

    That doesn't necessarily mean anything, especially since most of the actual comments on his Greenlight page are positive. It could be he's reading way too much into whatever "no" votes he's receiving. After all, it wouldn't be the first time somebody blamed their failure to break through commercially on their audience not being sophisticated enough to understand them.

    xderwsaxganu.png
  • DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Are they depressed it hasn't been Greenlit yet?

    Hyuk hyuk hyuk!
    Yes, that's a dumb joke, and yes I read the article. It reminds me of why I installed the Herp Derp Chrome addon.

    JtgVX0H.png
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    Frem wrote: »
    That may be the most ignorant and uninformed rant I've ever read outside of right-wing political sites.

    Given that he has a game on Greenlight, it seems unlikely that he'd be uninformed about the feedback its denizens provide.

    That doesn't necessarily mean anything, especially since most of the actual comments on his Greenlight page are positive. It could be he's reading way too much into whatever "no" votes he's receiving. After all, it wouldn't be the first time somebody blamed their failure to break through commercially on their audience not being sophisticated enough to understand them.

    You don't have to travel very many pages into his comments to start seeing people who downvoted because "it looked like a phone game."

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