The thread for things with more/less than two legs (NSF ento/arachno/ophidiophobes)

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  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Are Australian spider hunting wasps as scary as the ones in Africa? The ones in Africa will aggro extremely easily if you get near them while they have a spider and have been known to chase people substantial distances to sting them.

    They also make a very distinctive, loud noise when flying, so it's easy for them to make an entire group of people panic just by flying past.

    Even though the article is from my hometown, I actually don’t recall ever encountering hunting wasps. Most of our native insect species aren’t terribly aggressive, but I know very little about the larger wasps.

  • bwaniebwanie Posting into the void Registered User regular
    edited January 3
    By far and large, spider hunting wasps are solitary animals without a hivemind. They usually aren't as agressive as they value their own survival above a (nonexistant) hive. I do not know about these specific African hunting wasps.

    Africanized honeybees are terribly agressive of course, but i don't think you would mix those up.

    bwanie on
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  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    African honeybees are totally chill. It's only the mix of them and American bees that produces the rage.

    Jedoc
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    African honeybees are totally chill. It's only the mix of them and American bees that produces the rage.

    They're not very chill at all. The East-african lowland bee (which africanized bees are hybridized from) have the same defensive response as africanized bees with wider defensive radius, overkill response and long pursuit.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Well, the African bees I encountered were chill. I guess there's more than one kind of African bee.

  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Well, the African bees I encountered were chill. I guess there's more than one kind of African bee.

    If so you probably encountered stingless bees (melipones) as the western honey bee (of which the east-african lowland bee is a subspecies) is the only apis (honey bee) species outside of Asia.

    Melipones is a much more varied clade, with several hundred different variants that can be found all over the earth (although they rarely produce enough honey that they attract honey-raiders, human or otherwise).

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    tynic
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited January 3
    I definitely encountered stinging bees, but thanks for assuming I don't know what I'm talking about. I assisted with a project testing whether fixing beehives to trees would prevent elephants damaging those trees. Had to go up to the hives and pour pollen on top to feed the bees in winter. Hazardous, but no scarier than if I'd been doing it with English bees.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
  • DirtyboyDirtyboy Registered User regular
    English bees get mad if you're late with tea.

    Slacker71
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Dirtyboy wrote: »
    English bees get mad if you're late with tea.

    They're still very polite about it though.
    "Pip pip, cheerio, sorry about the sting ol' chap. Guess that'll serve to remind you what time tea is. Now, I best get along with perishing and all that rot."

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • King RiptorKing Riptor Registered User regular
    .
    I definitely encountered stinging bees, but thanks for assuming I don't know what I'm talking about. I assisted with a project testing whether fixing beehives to trees would prevent elephants damaging those trees. Had to go up to the hives and pour pollen on top to feed the bees in winter. Hazardous, but no scarier than if I'd been doing it with English bees.

    Well you have the whole wicker man thing for English bees which is a bit trickier to deal with

    I have a podcast now. It's about video games and anime!Find it here.
  • bwaniebwanie Posting into the void Registered User regular
    edited January 4
    African honeybees are totally chill. It's only the mix of them and American bees that produces the rage.

    Africanized implies they are not regular African bees. I am of course referring to the africanized western honey bee.

    bwanie on
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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited January 4
    My pen fell under the bed
    Spiderwebs(?)

    Peas on
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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen - Walter R. Tschinkel 5:18

    5myiokloks5d.png
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen - Kenny Coogan 5:22

    5myiokloks5d.png
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited February 4
    Went to a beach today. Saw dozens and dozens of washed up Portuguese Man of Wars.... Portuguese Men of War?
    po01z4au2sn0.jpg

    They were really tiny so I guess we witnessed a baby massacre?
    2vmgglnq8dzc.jpg

    There were also lots of snails which seemed to be eating them
    5mcl7rms4pqs.jpg

    Nature is so weird

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
    BahamutZEROJedocMulysaSemproniuschromdomGvzbgulEvilCakechrishallett83DisruptedCapitalistMvrcksarukun
  • DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist rugged, weathered Registered User regular
    Huh. I've heard about how sea turtles eat Man of Wars, but I guess I can add snails to that list now.

  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Huh. I've heard about how sea turtles eat Man of Wars, but I guess I can add snails to that list now.

    I'm pretty sure that a snail will eat anything that sits still long enough for the snail to take a bite.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
    DisruptedCapitalistMvrckvalhalla130
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Have you ever heard of Tortoise beetles? They're a subfamily of Leaf Beetles known for their often translucent and absolutely crazy carapaces.

    Say hello to Aspidomorpha sanctaecrucis, the Golden tortoise beetle.
    Screen%2Bshot%2B2011-03-29%2Bat%2B7.36.07%2BPM2.png

    This little fella looks even crazier when viewed from above.
    61511866._B8I46492.jpg

    But believe it or not, goldie over there isn't the only supermodel bug in the family, many other tortoise beetles are just as stunning.
    Imperial Tortoise beetle
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    The aptly named, Golden Target Tortoise beetle
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    Golden Tortoise beetle (Charidotella sexpunctata). Like a lady beetle went lady gaga.
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    Acromis sparsa is pretty colourless and transparent under normal light. Under UV light it's a completely different deal.
    26118338447_22a3b50d2c_b.jpg

    As you might have noticed, the acromis genus is known for its funky-looking elytra. This handsome devil being an Acromis spinifex
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    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    RanlinchromdomJedocMetzger MeisterSkeithN1tSt4lkerPeasAndy Joedoomybear
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    A Flea's Fantastic Jump Takes More Than Muscle | Deep Look 4:35

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    Metzger Meister
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Went to a beach today. Saw dozens and dozens of washed up Portuguese Man of Wars.... Portuguese Men of War?
    po01z4au2sn0.jpg

    They were really tiny so I guess we witnessed a baby massacre?
    2vmgglnq8dzc.jpg

    There were also lots of snails which seemed to be eating them
    5mcl7rms4pqs.jpg

    Nature is so weird

    You back in the uk or still in Africa? Those look like bluebottles - the Southern Hemispheres‘s close relation to man’o’war, which are quite a bit smaller. (or maybe they’re babies)

    My dogs also eat them, because they’re dumb as butts.

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