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The thread for things with more/less than two legs (NSF ento/arachno/ophidiophobes)

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    StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    I had a spider last fall who laid some eggs, but I haven't seen her in months. I dunno if she just died of age or if this wasp building a nest did the deed.

    YL9WnCY.png
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    MarshmallowMarshmallow Registered User regular
    There was a Manduca hawkmoth hovering around in the dairy section at the store I work at this morning. Scared the heck out of a customer who thought it was some weird hummingbird from the way it was flying.

    3693651576_87b463a2ce.jpg

    They're pretty neat.

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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    This is kinda bug related. I have two sarracenia pitcher plants I'm growing in our back yard. North American pitcher plants that trap insects in their pitchers. I got them back in March and they're really starting to grow like gangbusters now that it's warming up. One of the pitchers is getting close to maturing and opening. Probably about a week until it does!

    This is more or less what they'll look like when mature:

    6248721724_2acb5cbc27.jpg

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister It Gets Worse before it gets any better.Registered User regular
    edited April 2013
    a ladybug almost flew into my mouth the other day! instead she ricocheted off my bottom lip and fell to the sidewalk, where i picked her up and moved her to my mom's garden.

    silly bug.

    also, i am actually very excited for the variety of crawlies that i'll get to see when I'm up in Seattle (WHICH IS ON LIKE THE EIGHTH HOLY SHIT)

    as long as there are no exorbitantly large centipedes. they are the only bug that i can't even look at, i don't know why but they fucking terrify me.

    edit: like that big one on the last page? i recoiled in horror from my monitor.

    Metzger Meister on
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    valhalla130valhalla130 13 Dark Shield Perceives the GodsRegistered User regular
    I have this thing where I can't actually touch bugs. Like at all. They don't scare me, but my heart starts racing anytime a cockroach races towards me. I think they feel fear.

    But I always feel bad when I see a bug in the middle of a parking lot on a hot day, that looks like it's starting to roast. I don't know what to do, and honestly, by the time they look like that, it's probably too lte for them anyway. Right?

    asxcjbppb2eo.jpg
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    one of the things I really like about the Puget Sound area is that the bugs overall are pretty inoffensive. There are lots of spiderwebs in the fall, but other than that and mosquitoes in the summer in some areas, there's not any particular bug that's going to be a significant bother.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    I bought some Blaptica dubia cockroaches to use as feeders for my spiders, because I don't really like using crickets (they are noisy, smelly and die a lot).

    But the roaches are too cute and I don't have the heart to sacrifice them :(

    First World Bug Lover Problems

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    I found another zebra jumper today

    this one was really small, so I'm guessing it might have been a juvenile?

    super cute

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    TurambarTurambar Independent Registered User regular
    BugBoy wrote: »
    I found a beautiful little beetle today

    he was metallic blue

    other recent finds include a zebra jumping spider and a boxelder bug

    BB you need a camera

    Steam: turamb | Origin: Turamb | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar | Warframe(PC): Turamb
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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    I take photos of everything I find

    one of these days I'll get around to making a blog or something

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    Butler For Life #1Butler For Life #1 Twinning is WinningRegistered User regular
    Do it now bugbro

    I want to read BugBoy's Bug Blog

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    B4 for short

    I like that a lot

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    #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Bob Loblug's Bug Blog

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    When I was a kid just getting into the whole entomology thing, I had a few field guides that I really loved

    one of the bugs that I really liked was this beautiful ladybug with an incredible name

    it was black with two perfect red circles on its back, and so it was called the twice stabbed ladybug

    how can you not love something with a name like that

    today I finally saw one outside of a book

    I am very, very happy

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    ButlerButler 89 episodes or bust Registered User regular
    Xehalus wrote: »
    when will evolution lead to superhyperparasitoidsturbo I wonder

    Each successive stage of parasitism named after a season of Power Rangers.

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    StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited May 2013
    Nitrogen is a common limiting factor for plants, so carnivorous plants consume insects for it. If you give some species a fertilizer with enough nitrogen, their various traps will wither and may even cease growing since it's a waste of energy to maintain them.

    Save a bug: fertilize your plants.

    Sterica on
    YL9WnCY.png
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    Nitrogen is a common limiting factor for plants, so carnivorous plants consume insects for it. If you give some species a fertilizer with enough nitrogen, their various traps will wither and may even cease growing since it's a waste of energy to maintain them.

    Save a bug: fertilize your plants.

    Actually many carnivorous plants will be damaged by a nutrient rich growing medium because their roots can't handle it. The traps will die usually because the roots are damaged. You can get away with spraying some carnivorous plants on the leaves with a diluted fertilizer solution. But for many carnivorous plants, fertilizer is a big no no. I know young sarracenia are one family of carnivorous plants that will benefit from fertilizer.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Basically the best way to keep a carnivorous plant fertilized is to either grow it where it will be able to trap insects or if it's somewhere where it just isn't able to trap bugs on a regular basis, feed it a bug or two a month and that will usually be fine. Amount of sunlight and sufficient water will be far more important though.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    LalaboxLalabox Registered User regular
    Some cool bugs
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io2_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io6_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io7_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io8_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io5_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io1_500.jpg
    Strange Insects

    -Devil’s Flower Mantis - one of the largest types of praying mantis, they can measure up to 13 centimeters in length and have a range of coloring that allows them to mimic the Devil’s Flower, a type of orchid.
    -Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar - before transforming into a beautiful fluorescent blue butterfly, its an armored, blood-red caterpillar with tinted visor shades for eyes and a quadruple row of blunt horns running across its body.
    -Scorpionfly (Mecoptera) - neither scorpion or fly, what looks like a scorpion’s stinger on the insect is actually its genitals.
    -Calleta Silkmoth Caterpillar - with a massive color range and dangerous looking barbs, this caterpillar is something most predators avoid.
    -Giant Prickly Stick Insect (Extatosoma tiaratum) - as the largest known stick insect, it reaches lengths of 20 centimeters. It is covered with large thorny spikes which double as camouflage and defensive armor.
    -Goliath Beetle - can grow more than 4 inches in length and weigh about 100 grams in their larval stage. It is alleged to be mostly vegetarian.

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    man, I love scorpionflies

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    LalaboxLalabox Registered User regular
    As resident expert, do you reckon that the scorpionfly genitals are a form of mimic to make it look more dangerous, or just happy coincidence, or can we just not know?

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    I'd guess happy coincidence

    but it'd be amusing if it were mimicry

    one day a proto-scorpionfly saw a scorpion and thought

    "yeah, I can do that, but with my dick."

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    LalaboxLalabox Registered User regular
    BugBoy wrote: »
    I'd guess happy coincidence

    but it'd be amusing if it were mimicry

    one day a proto-scorpionfly saw a scorpion and thought

    "yeah, I can do that, but with my dick."

    As hilarious as that is, I was more thinking along the lines of bugs and animals that have evolved and now look like other more dangerous animals. So that predators tend not to mess with them.

    Although I suppose that evolution just does its own thing and doesn't care about intentions.

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    Speaking of insects with impressive reproductive bits

    I saw an ichneumon today!

    her ovipositor was about as long as the rest of her body combined (not counting the antennae)

    so cool

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    chromdomchromdom Who? Where?Registered User regular
    I have a bug, specifically spider, question:
    We got a spider in our warehouse, and the two warehouse workers (Mexican from Esenada and a Guatemalan, and we're in L.A.,for geographic references) were pretty scared of it.
    It was about a half inch long, a little longer than it was wide. Legs, mandibles/mouth and eye area, and kind of the edges of the body were black. There was a pretty sizable light brown spot on its back. They guys were trying to shoo it off the pallet without touching it, while I was standing asking what the big deal was. So far as I know, black widows are the only dangerous spiders we have anywhere near the area.
    So anyway, I forget how, but the spider got on my arm. The two guys freaked out, and one slapped it off my arm to the floor, then stepped on it.

    First of all, is that anywhere near enough info to identify the spider? If so, was it at all dangerous, or can I tell my guys they're a bunch of wusses?

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    BugBoyBugBoy boy.EXE has stopped functioning. only bugs remainRegistered User regular
    the description doesn't sound like any of the poisonous spiders that I know, but I'm only familiar with a few

    people tend to be pretty frightened of spiders, but most aren't dangerous and even those that are usually aren't agressive

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    KaplarKaplar On Google MapsRegistered User regular
    Lalabox wrote: »
    Some cool bugs
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io2_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io6_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io7_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io8_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io5_500.jpg
    tumblr_mm3f0iNF2O1rw872io1_500.jpg
    Strange Insects

    -Devil’s Flower Mantis - one of the largest types of praying mantis, they can measure up to 13 centimeters in length and have a range of coloring that allows them to mimic the Devil’s Flower, a type of orchid.
    -Pipevine Swallowtail Caterpillar - before transforming into a beautiful fluorescent blue butterfly, its an armored, blood-red caterpillar with tinted visor shades for eyes and a quadruple row of blunt horns running across its body.
    -Scorpionfly (Mecoptera) - neither scorpion or fly, what looks like a scorpion’s stinger on the insect is actually its genitals.
    -Calleta Silkmoth Caterpillar - with a massive color range and dangerous looking barbs, this caterpillar is something most predators avoid.
    -Giant Prickly Stick Insect (Extatosoma tiaratum) - as the largest known stick insect, it reaches lengths of 20 centimeters. It is covered with large thorny spikes which double as camouflage and defensive armor.
    -Goliath Beetle - can grow more than 4 inches in length and weigh about 100 grams in their larval stage. It is alleged to be mostly vegetarian.

    That mantis is a damn gladiator.

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    MarshmallowMarshmallow Registered User regular
    chromdom wrote: »
    I have a bug, specifically spider, question:
    We got a spider in our warehouse, and the two warehouse workers (Mexican from Esenada and a Guatemalan, and we're in L.A.,for geographic references) were pretty scared of it.
    It was about a half inch long, a little longer than it was wide. Legs, mandibles/mouth and eye area, and kind of the edges of the body were black. There was a pretty sizable light brown spot on its back. They guys were trying to shoo it off the pallet without touching it, while I was standing asking what the big deal was. So far as I know, black widows are the only dangerous spiders we have anywhere near the area.
    So anyway, I forget how, but the spider got on my arm. The two guys freaked out, and one slapped it off my arm to the floor, then stepped on it.

    First of all, is that anywhere near enough info to identify the spider? If so, was it at all dangerous, or can I tell my guys they're a bunch of wusses?

    Parson spider?

    ParsonSpider.jpg

    They're the right size, common as heck, and like the indoors. Their bite is pretty mild unless you're allergic. Not pleasant, but not really dangerous either.

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    chromdomchromdom Who? Where?Registered User regular
    Can't say for certain, but leaning towards no. Thanks for looking though. Maybe I will try to figure it out; is there a good resource for figuring it out?

    S'pose it would help if I knew where the pallet came from too...

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    TurambarTurambar Independent Registered User regular
    BugBoy wrote: »
    her ovipositor was about as long as the rest of her body combined (not counting the antennae)

    :winky:

    Steam: turamb | Origin: Turamb | 3DS: 3411-1109-4537 | NNID: Turambar | Warframe(PC): Turamb
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Fuzzbutt posted a picture of these guys a while back, but I was just learning about them the other day so I can give talks on them at the zoo, and I wanted to tell you all about how rad they are, because they are rad.

    Extatosoma%20tiaratum%20Giant%20prickly%20stick%20insect%20shutterstock_8439298.jpg?timestamp=1351105652808

    This is Macleay's Spectre Stick Insect, Extatosoma tiaratum, and they mostly come from Australia. They don't have any defense mechanisms except for being a bit spikey, so they have to rely on camouflage and mimicry. They look like leaves, and will wobble on their legs to look like leaves that are shaking in the wind, which is kind of funny to watch. They will also arch their abdomen up over their back to mimic a scorpion if they're threatened.

    I think my favourite thing about them is how they reproduce. Females will flick their tails to propel the eggs they're laying several feet onto the forest floor, which is kind of an extreme way to lay eggs. These eggs are coated in a compound which is really attractive to a specific species of toxic ant, so when these ants find an egg they carry it down into their nest. They eat the tasty coating but aren't interested in the egg and discard it in the trash piles within their nest. So the eggs get to mature and develop safely, protected by an entire colony of toxic ants, which is a pretty good babysitter.

    When the eggs hatch the nymphs look like the ants so they can escape undetected, and they run out of the nest and into the trees.

    Females only have vestigal wings, and it's up to the males to fly around and find females to breed with. What's also rad is that if there are no males around, the females can reproduce asexually. They lay unfertilised eggs which all hatch out female, actually genetic clones of their mothers. It's not great for the population but will allow them to survive long enough for some males to hopefully turn up, which I think is an awesome evolutionary survival tactic.

    The only thing I DON'T like about them is that in this country their favourite thing to eat is bramble. Which is a fucking nightmare to handle and by far the most dangerous thing I have to work with out of all the animals I look after at the zoo.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
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    Binary SquidBinary Squid We all make choices Registered User regular
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    I had a spider last fall who laid some eggs, but I haven't seen her in months. I dunno if she just died of age or if this wasp building a nest did the deed.

    It was natural causes. You can tell because of her last web.

    SOME RORUS

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    Mr FuzzbuttMr Fuzzbutt Registered User regular
    In Australia they like eucalyptus, which is all over the place so they are super easy to feed and look after.

    broken image link
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    Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    In other news, as a birthday present to myself I just ordered two new spiderlings.

    One Avicularia versicolor aka Martinique Pinktoe. They start out looking like this:

    Avicularia_versicolor.JPG

    and grow into this:

    dsc09011ztm1.jpg

    And also a Monocentropus balfouri aka Socotra Island Baboon. They are quite new to the hobby and expensive, but I decided to treat myself because they might be my favourite looking tarantula ever.

    2491424047_0a8b726973.jpg

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    valhalla130valhalla130 13 Dark Shield Perceives the GodsRegistered User regular
    smof wrote: »
    Fuzzbutt posted a picture of these guys a while back, but I was just learning about them the other day so I can give talks on them at the zoo, and I wanted to tell you all about how rad they are, because they are rad.

    Extatosoma%20tiaratum%20Giant%20prickly%20stick%20insect%20shutterstock_8439298.jpg?timestamp=1351105652808

    This is Macleay's Spectre Stick Insect, Extatosoma tiaratum, and they mostly come from Australia. They don't have any defense mechanisms except for being a bit spikey, so they have to rely on camouflage and mimicry. They look like leaves, and will wobble on their legs to look like leaves that are shaking in the wind, which is kind of funny to watch. They will also arch their abdomen up over their back to mimic a scorpion if they're threatened.

    I think my favourite thing about them is how they reproduce. Females will flick their tails to propel the eggs they're laying several feet onto the forest floor, which is kind of an extreme way to lay eggs. These eggs are coated in a compound which is really attractive to a specific species of toxic ant, so when these ants find an egg they carry it down into their nest. They eat the tasty coating but aren't interested in the egg and discard it in the trash piles within their nest. So the eggs get to mature and develop safely, protected by an entire colony of toxic ants, which is a pretty good babysitter.

    When the eggs hatch the nymphs look like the ants so they can escape undetected, and they run out of the nest and into the trees.

    Females only have vestigal wings, and it's up to the males to fly around and find females to breed with. What's also rad is that if there are no males around, the females can reproduce asexually. They lay unfertilised eggs which all hatch out female, actually genetic clones of their mothers. It's not great for the population but will allow them to survive long enough for some males to hopefully turn up, which I think is an awesome evolutionary survival tactic.

    The only thing I DON'T like about them is that in this country their favourite thing to eat is bramble. Which is a fucking nightmare to handle and by far the most dangerous thing I have to work with out of all the animals I look after at the zoo.

    It is amazing to me that a life cycle like that can develop with so many intricate steps that all rely on another animal. They have the egg coating, which the toxic ants eat. The mother flings the eggs onto the forest floor to be picked up by the ants. The ants don't happen to eat the egg itself or damage it in any way. And the nymphs look like the ants so they can escape. Amazing.

    asxcjbppb2eo.jpg
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    The MantizThe Mantiz BONK! DenmarkRegistered User regular
    smof wrote: »
    In other news, as a birthday present to myself I just ordered two new spiderlings.

    One Avicularia versicolor aka Martinique Pinktoe. They start out looking like this:

    Avicularia_versicolor.JPG

    and grow into this:

    dsc09011ztm1.jpg

    And also a Monocentropus balfouri aka Socotra Island Baboon. They are quite new to the hobby and expensive, but I decided to treat myself because they might be my favourite looking tarantula ever.

    2491424047_0a8b726973.jpg

    Oh man. versicolor is such a great spider. Very calm, but fast as hell. I loved feeding mine flying insects just to watch it jump across the terrarium in a split second. Sometimes it was as if it just appeared out of thin air.

    The only annoying thing about them is that they tend to either shit all over the front glass, or build their web on it, making it impossible to feed them without ruining their work.

    Now I miss mine :(

    3DS - 2878-9572-9277
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    that's fucking rad, smof!

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    bug related because it's a carnivorous plant, my sarracenia flava has its first mature, open pitcher!

    922831_10151652045916103_665634198_n.jpg

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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    DruhimDruhim Registered User, ClubPA regular
    the tiny plant in the other pot is a young dente flytrap and the smaller cluster of shoots in the same pot as the S. flava is a S. rubra wherryi.

    belruelotterav-1.jpg
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