Traveling from the States?

245

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  • FPFr0styFPFr0sty Registered User regular
    The Kangs are mainly eaten by the natives (Aborigines); its like one of their special meals; shoot they get a heap delivered to Barwon Prison and the other one next door, around xmas time... and they get to cook it in a pit, as though they were with their tribes.

    Oh, and we do have a 1child policy as well... if you have more then 2, we feed one to a dingo :)...

    One of those is fact, and one is fiction... :P

  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    No, both are fiction. Kangaroo meat isn't as popular in the general population as beef, chicken, or lamb, but plenty of people do eat it. You can buy it in Woolworths. It's cheap, lean meat - though a bit gamey for some beef recipes.

    ---
    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
    fieldafar
  • zerochosenzerochosen WollongongRegistered User regular
    *Spoiler alert - this is not a lie* That being said, kangaroo meat is delicious and you should make a point of trying it when you are here. It gets gamey if overcooked or left in the fridge for a few days, do best eaten medium rare. Trust me, I'm a foodaholic :)

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    http://www.enemy-agency.com
  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    Think of it like venison; it's gamey, but that can be a good thing. A simple kangaroo steak sandwich with just the meat and some baby spinach is amazing. Otherwise just cook it as you would venison.

    It's also almost completely lean, so it is perfect for making jerky.

    ---
    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
  • DragonBearDragonBear Registered User regular
    @FatSoDa @zerochosen has already told everyone how much we like to mislead our mates from abroad :-)

    DropBears are as real as the headache you will get when one lands on you.
    KangaBangas are best on a barbie and if you want to argue about how Emu tastes, I'll bake one in a biscuit for you.
    Our TV shows are weak, no wait, their TV shows are aired at least a month behind over here so I agree, set your TIVO.

    Everything from the 'shouts' upwards is bang on the money tho' ;-)

  • zerochosenzerochosen WollongongRegistered User regular
    Oh, and never eat crocodile. It's like a fish and a chicken made a horrible tasting baby :-/

    A webcomic by me: Enemy Agency
    http://www.enemy-agency.com
    DanacyrusDragonBearCamaran
  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    I would like to meet up with some the US attendees that are going...even though I am from Sydney :)

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • langrilangri Registered User regular
    I'll be travelling in from the US -- Minnesota specifically -- for about two weeks.

    I plan to fly into Sydney a few days early, see some local sights, and then travel by train or air to Melbourne and spend the bulk of the time. I have the flight from LA to Sydney booked, and hotel accommodations for PAX, but nothing else as of yet (plenty of time).

    I'd love to get in on a PAX group trip from Sydney to Melbourne on PAX Eve (Thursday), if such a thing were to be organized. Also, if any locals wouldn't mind allowing a dirty Yank to couch surf for a few days... :D

    Regardless, I'm absolutely looking forward to visiting Australia. The things I've heard about the country and people are overwhelmingly positive. Not so much for all the freaking venomous critters you have running around, but I hope to avoid them.

    Looking forward to the trip.

    thegh0sts
  • FPFr0styFPFr0sty Registered User regular
    Catch surf.... in winter.... the water temp would be around 12-15degrees. But if you do really want to, I suggest going to brizzy for a few days and get some surf up there as the water temps range between 25-30 degrees

  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    Couch surf = stay at someone's place (ie sleep on the couch).

    ---
    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
  • FPFr0styFPFr0sty Registered User regular
    must be a yanky thing :P

  • zerzhulzerzhul Registered User, Moderator mod
  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    what also sucks is that internet you have to pay for i believe in some hotels....aka surcharge...screw that for 3 days!

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • quietjayquietjay Indianapolis, INRegistered User regular
    Flight booked! Cashed in all my Delta Skymiles for a business class award ticket. I'm flying into Sydney a week before PAX and out of Melbourne the Tuesday after PAX.

    This will be my 3rd PAX. I went to the first PAX East in 2010, and PAX Prime in 2012.

  • StupidStupid Newcastle, NSWRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    First off, many thanks to the people who responded to my earlier questions. Things got crazy around here, and planning was put on the back burner for a bit, but it's all coming together now. I won't bore you with the specific details of our complicated flight arrangements (six different one-way flights!) but I do have a few more questions:

    We are considering hiring a car for our initial week or so, and driving from Sydney to Canberra. The cost for a car for the entire time is only about $200 more than the flight from Sydney to Canberra and I'm sure we will enjoy the added flexibility of being able to drive around in Sydney and Canberra. We're both licensed driver in the States, but have no idea about particular local laws and ordinances. What specifically should we be aware of aside from the obvious (ie driving on the wrong side of the road).

    Parking is usually the big problem with having a car. Would it be possible (or safe) to rely on street parking, or would hotel parking (and associated fees) be required? We would only be using the car in and between Sydney and Canberra.

    Goggle maps shows one small section of road between Sydney and Canberra being a toll road: the M5 freeway. (Although one wonders how it can be a "freeway" if it is a toll road? Isn't that the very definition of a non-free way?) In the States, toll roads in major cities often require the driver to have a local transit pass. Is this the case in Sydney as well, or can we just drop some change into the hopper and be on our merry way?

    Are there any smaller "must see" places between Sydney and Canberra that would make for an interesting stop or overnight? We would be coming through mid-week, probably Wednesday or Thursday.

    If we don't get a car, how easy/extensive is the public transit? For example, we live near San Francisco and I would never recommend a tourist to use Muni; sure it goes EVERYWHERE, but it is dirty, expensive, and scary, and it requires arcane knowledge of bus/train schedules and transfer schemes. On the other hand, we have never gotten a car in six trips to Seattle. The transit there is clean, and very inexpensive (free much of the time) so you just get on any bus going "that way" and jump off whenever you get close to your destination. (google maps public transit routing helps a lot too.) We're already comitted to relying on Public Transit for the week we are in Melbourne.

    One of the ways we have been successful in keeping travel costs down (despite our expensive tastes) is to cook out own meals. We are pretty self sufficient when it comes to food, but that requires a hotel that has a kitchenette. Is there a hotel chain similar to the Homewood Suites in Sydney, Canberra, and/or Melbourne? I'm certainly willing to pay an extra $20 a night when it saves us $100 a day in restaurant charges!

    As an aside, we are completely going to pass on the Yarra Valley region. We live in a world renowned wine-growing region ourselves (Sonoma CA) and we'd like to see things that are not-like-home or are typically Australian. Thanks for any advice!

    Stupid on

    26904.png
  • FatSoDaFatSoDa Professor Doctor AustraliaRegistered User regular
    Stupid wrote: »
    First off, many thanks to the people who responded to my earlier questions. Things got crazy around here, and planning was put on the back burner for a bit, but it's all coming together now. I won't bore you with the specific details of our complicated flight arrangements (six different one-way flights!) but I do have a few more questions:

    Ahh yes budget airtravel i know you well.
    Stupid wrote: »
    We are considering hiring a car for our initial week or so, and driving from Sydney to Canberra. The cost for a car for the entire time is only about $200 more than the flight from Sydney to Canberra and I'm sure we will enjoy the added flexibility of being able to drive around in Sydney and Canberra. We're both licensed driver in the States, but have no idea about particular local laws and ordinances. What specifically should we be aware of aside from the obvious (ie driving on the wrong side of the road).

    You should be able to drive just fine, just keep thinking keep-to-left keep-to-left keep-to-left keep-to-left keep-to-left keep-to-left.
    Here is some more info for you

    http://goaustralia.about.com/cs/practicalinfo/a/ausdrive1.htm
    Stupid wrote: »
    Parking is usually the big problem with having a car. Would it be possible (or safe) to rely on street parking, or would hotel parking (and associated fees) be required? We would only be using the car in and between Sydney and Canberra.

    Parking in Sydney is a stone cold bitch. There is no way else to put it. Parking in Canberra is relatively easy. I live in Canberra and work in Sydney a fair bit, when i got to Sydney i dont even bother to bring a car, theres plenty of public transport and if not there are taxis everywhere.
    Stupid wrote: »
    Goggle maps shows one small section of road between Sydney and Canberra being a toll road: the M5 freeway. (Although one wonders how it can be a "freeway" if it is a toll road? Isn't that the very definition of a non-free way?) In the States, toll roads in major cities often require the driver to have a local transit pass. Is this the case in Sydney as well, or can we just drop some change into the hopper and be on our merry way?

    Are there any smaller "must see" places between Sydney and Canberra that would make for an interesting stop or overnight? We would be coming through mid-week, probably Wednesday or Thursday.

    Not really. Goulbourne has the Big Merino, which is a 15 metre tall concrete sheep.... so theres that. About the M5 there is a way around it, you just have to use city streets instead
    Stupid wrote: »
    If we don't get a car, how easy/extensive is the public transit? For example, we live near San Francisco and I would never recommend a tourist to use Muni; sure it goes EVERYWHERE, but it is dirty, expensive, and scary, and it requires arcane knowledge of bus/train schedules and transfer schemes. On the other hand, we have never gotten a car in six trips to Seattle. The transit there is clean, and very inexpensive (free much of the time) so you just get on any bus going "that way" and jump off whenever you get close to your destination. (google maps public transit routing helps a lot too.) We're already comitted to relying on Public Transit for the week we are in Melbourne.

    I would say you probably wouldnt need the car in Sydney or Melbourne. Canberra is alot more spread out and a car though not necessary (Canberra's public transport is excellent but tends to run on either half hour or hourly timetables so it can be some time before you see a bus) it would be useful. The drive down to Melbourne is also not horrible from Canberra.
    Stupid wrote: »
    One of the ways we have been successful in keeping travel costs down (despite our expensive tastes) is to cook out own meals. We are pretty self sufficient when it comes to food, but that requires a hotel that has a kitchenette. Is there a hotel chain similar to the Homewood Suites in Sydney, Canberra, and/or Melbourne? I'm certainly willing to pay an extra $20 a night when it saves us $100 a day in restaurant charges!

    Can help here there is however a couple of threads devoted to the apartments/rooms for rent
    Stupid wrote: »
    As an aside, we are completely going to pass on the Yarra Valley region. We live in a world renowned wine-growing region ourselves (Sonoma CA) and we'd like to see things that are not-like-home or are typically Australian. Thanks for any advice!

    When in Sydney

    - Bondi Beach, White Rabbit(Chinese Australian Resteraunt - Amazing Food), Botanical Gardens, Manly Ferry, Bridge Climb, Go to the Rocks(its an area of sydney basically its old sydney town the first permanent structures of the city were built here.) Oxford Street and Kings Cross - if you arent offended by blue light districts, Darling Harbor.

    When in Canberra
    - Questacon, National Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Sammies (best Chinese food ever!!! no arguments get the boneless pork chili pepper hotpot), Old Parliament House + Aboriginal Tent Embassy(be very careful here dont take anyones photo without asking and dont touch anything), Brod Burger - don't eat breakfast and make sure you can handle the cholesterol, New Parliament House, The Australian War Memorial, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve if you get the time the Tidbinbilla Deep Space Observatory is also good.

    [E]nforcing it Like I stole it
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  • zerochosenzerochosen WollongongRegistered User regular
    So... many... questions :) I'll try to answer as much as I can with the disclaimer that I may not know what I'm talking about.

    As far as local road laws go, we're very strict on drink driving - it is considered a criminal offence. We also have roundabouts instead of traffic lights at many intersections (which LA/NY didn't have when I was there a few years ago, but you may have them in the US now). Give way to the right and indicate when your getting on and off and you should be fine (although there is tales of tourists going straight over them!)

    If you are staying ay a hotel, it is worth paying the extra $15-$30 per night to get a parking spot - Most major cities have parking meters so you will be paying anyway. Canberra is pretty good with taxis, but a bit spread out, so I'd look for a place right in the heart.

    Public transport between Sydney and Canberra is by train (and I think bus) the trip isn't particularly cheap or comfortable. Public transport can be a bit of pain in Australia unless you're in a big city.

    Not sure about where is best to stay in Canberra, but Riverside in Melbourne have apartments with kitchens.

    If you are looking for a nice place to stay between Sydney and Canberra I'd recommend Wollongong which is on the coast (just because I live there doesn't mean I'm biased :)) It's about half an hour out of the way off the Highway to Canberra (or a bit longer if you take the Great Ocean Road, which is awesome) but is very nice... staying at the Novatel will get you a nice view of the Pacific Ocean.

    The toll for the M5 is about $4.50, and I'm pretty sure they still have cash booths. I'd ask your car rental place about whether they have "E Tags" installed on the rental car which will pay the toll automatically.

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  • zerochosenzerochosen WollongongRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    beleted!

    zerochosen on
    A webcomic by me: Enemy Agency
    http://www.enemy-agency.com
  • SandmanTechSandmanTech MelbourneRegistered User regular
    Just about the tolls: In Melbourne, the Citylink E-Tag (which is the way tolls are paid in many areas of Australia, rather than cash/coin) works in Sydney too. Best thing to do is to speak to the company you wish to hire the car through, as a number of them have E-Tags in the car already - just let them know when you return the car that you have been on the toll roads.

    The Riverside apartments in Melbourne are very good from what I have heard, but my recommendation for a national chain is to use the Quest apartments. I have used them for years traveling around Australia and into New Zealand and highly recommend them.

    As for things to see in Victoria, I suggest the Melbourne Cricket Ground (100,000 seat stadium), Etihad Stadium (the Saturday night during PAX has a game on inside it), Victoria Market (especially for fresh food to cook with), the laneways and China Town within the CBD, Melbourne Aquarium, Melbourne Museum, Scienceworks, the parks and gardens, the Dandenongs for various art, and the 3 Zoos - Melbourne Zoo, Werribee Open Plains and the Healesville Sanctuary (where you can feed baby wombats and possum when I last went there). But there is a plethora of things to do in all of the Australian capital cities.

    Except Adelaide. But that is a story for next time.

  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    langri wrote: »
    I'll be travelling in from the US -- Minnesota specifically -- for about two weeks.

    I plan to fly into Sydney a few days early, see some local sights, and then travel by train or air to Melbourne and spend the bulk of the time. I have the flight from LA to Sydney booked, and hotel accommodations for PAX, but nothing else as of yet (plenty of time).

    I'd love to get in on a PAX group trip from Sydney to Melbourne on PAX Eve (Thursday), if such a thing were to be organized. Also, if any locals wouldn't mind allowing a dirty Yank to couch surf for a few days... :D

    Regardless, I'm absolutely looking forward to visiting Australia. The things I've heard about the country and people are overwhelmingly positive. Not so much for all the freaking venomous critters you have running around, but I hope to avoid them.

    Looking forward to the trip.

    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • StupidStupid Newcastle, NSWRegistered User regular
    FatSoDa wrote: »
    Stupid wrote: »
    If we don't get a car, how easy/extensive is the public transit? For example, we live near San Francisco and I would never recommend a tourist to use Muni; sure it goes EVERYWHERE, but it is dirty, expensive, and scary, and it requires arcane knowledge of bus/train schedules and transfer schemes. On the other hand, we have never gotten a car in six trips to Seattle. The transit there is clean, and very inexpensive (free much of the time) so you just get on any bus going "that way" and jump off whenever you get close to your destination. (google maps public transit routing helps a lot too.) We're already comitted to relying on Public Transit for the week we are in Melbourne.
    I would say you probably wouldnt need the car in Sydney or Melbourne. Canberra is alot more spread out and a car though not necessary (Canberra's public transport is excellent but tends to run on either half hour or hourly timetables so it can be some time before you see a bus) it would be useful. The drive down to Melbourne is also not horrible from Canberra.
    Google maps claims a 6+ hour drive from Canberra to Melbourne, a non-trivial amount of time. While I'm a self-admitted cheapskate, that amount of time is not worth saving the cost for a flight. Plus we would simply be dropping the car upon arrival in Melbourne anyway.
    zerochosen wrote: »
    As far as local road laws go, we're very strict on drink driving - it is considered a criminal offence. We also have roundabouts instead of traffic lights at many intersections (which LA/NY didn't have when I was there a few years ago, but you may have them in the US now). Give way to the right and indicate when your getting on and off and you should be fine (although there is tales of tourists going straight over them!)
    I work for GHD and we have several traffic engineers in our office. One is a huge proponent of roundabouts. There are actually a few at the city we usually visit for our skiing weekends: Truckee, CA. The hardest part is going to be going around clockwise!!
    zerochosen wrote: »
    If you are looking for a nice place to stay between Sydney and Canberra I'd recommend Wollongong which is on the coast (just because I live there doesn't mean I'm biased :)) It's about half an hour out of the way off the Highway to Canberra (or a bit longer if you take the Great Ocean Road, which is awesome) but is very nice... staying at the Novatel will get you a nice view of the Pacific Ocean.
    I'm planning on trying to leverage GHD's hotel pricing as much as possible. I'll check to see if there is anyplace there on the list.
    The Riverside apartments in Melbourne are very good from what I have heard, but my recommendation for a national chain is to use the Quest apartments. I have used them for years traveling around Australia and into New Zealand and highly recommend them.
    Oh! I'll definitely check in on this! Thanks!!!


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  • AusSkillerAusSkiller Registered User new member
    Stupid wrote: »
    We're both licensed driver in the States, but have no idea about particular local laws and ordinances. What specifically should we be aware of aside from the obvious (ie driving on the wrong side of the road).
    In addition to what the others have said you should be aware there's no equivalent to being able to make a right turn on a red light here which I hear is something some states have in the US, if it's a red light here you can't make any turn (unless there's a green light specifically for the turn you want to make of course). Also if you are going to go anywhere near the Melbourne city center in a car you should probably read up on hook turns (a right turn from the left lane) because the city center has many intersections where the only way to turn right is with a hook turn, there are also a few other intersections scattered around Melbourne that use them too, but they aren't really used anywhere else in Australia.

  • langrilangri Registered User regular
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    AusSkiller wrote: »
    In addition to what the others have said you should be aware there's no equivalent to being able to make a right turn on a red light here which I hear is something some states have in the US, if it's a red light here you can't make any turn (unless there's a green light specifically for the turn you want to make of course).

    There are some intersections down here in Canberra where you can turn left on a red (after stopping), but there'll be a specific sign underneath the light telling you that you can do this.

    Also, with regards to the M5 toll, afaik they moved to a cashless system a while ago, so you can either buy an E-tag, or just drive through and pay via the toll website after the gate cameras have snapped your car. Haven't actually driven this at all (or passengered through recently) so idk for certain.

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  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

    i'll be flying to Melbourne on the 18th as well but on an afternoon flight :D

    just thought could meet up in sydney and say hello (maybe do an escort mission LOL)...if i was available before.

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • langrilangri Registered User regular
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

    i'll be flying to Melbourne on the 18th as well but on an afternoon flight :D

    just thought could meet up in sydney and say hello (maybe do an escort mission LOL)...if i was available before.
    I'd certainly appreciate you showing me around Sydney. As long as we avoid all the poisonous critters that I hear are everywhere over there :)

    thegh0sts
  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

    i'll be flying to Melbourne on the 18th as well but on an afternoon flight :D

    just thought could meet up in sydney and say hello (maybe do an escort mission LOL)...if i was available before.
    I'd certainly appreciate you showing me around Sydney. As long as we avoid all the poisonous critters that I hear are everywhere over there :)

    if i don't get some work in the meantime i'll be happy to show you around, keep you company, and making sure you're not stirring the locals LOL.

    don't worry about the critters: that's mainly in the more central parts of Australia - cities areas are much easier....just remember to look to the right when crossing roads cos we drive on the other side here in Australia :p

    also, if you're coming in from tullamarine there's a bus service called skybus that runs from the airport to the city at southern cross station and is about 1-2 blocks away from the hotel ibis melbourne.

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • FatSoDaFatSoDa Professor Doctor AustraliaRegistered User regular
    Yeah when your in Sydney you only have to worry about funnel webs, brown snakes, magpies, red belly black snake, and the eastern tiger snake.

    Its cool though, you should be fine!


    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

    i'll be flying to Melbourne on the 18th as well but on an afternoon flight :D

    just thought could meet up in sydney and say hello (maybe do an escort mission LOL)...if i was available before.
    I'd certainly appreciate you showing me around Sydney. As long as we avoid all the poisonous critters that I hear are everywhere over there :)

    if i don't get some work in the meantime i'll be happy to show you around, keep you company, and making sure you're not stirring the locals LOL.

    don't worry about the critters: that's mainly in the more central parts of Australia - cities areas are much easier....just remember to look to the right when crossing roads cos we drive on the other side here in Australia :p

    also, if you're coming in from tullamarine there's a bus service called skybus that runs from the airport to the city at southern cross station and is about 1-2 blocks away from the hotel ibis melbourne.

    [E]nforcing it Like I stole it
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  • langrilangri Registered User regular
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    langri wrote: »
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    you'll love it :D

    What are your planned dates for sydney?

    oh, it'll be winter in Australia in july but not like snowing so just bring some light jackets....cos everything is expensive here.

    I'll be arriving in Sydney on July 15th (I think), and I'll probably take an early flight from Sydney to Melbourne on July 18th. This is all subject to the whims of fate, of course. :)

    i'll be flying to Melbourne on the 18th as well but on an afternoon flight :D

    just thought could meet up in sydney and say hello (maybe do an escort mission LOL)...if i was available before.
    I'd certainly appreciate you showing me around Sydney. As long as we avoid all the poisonous critters that I hear are everywhere over there :)

    if i don't get some work in the meantime i'll be happy to show you around, keep you company, and making sure you're not stirring the locals LOL.

    don't worry about the critters: that's mainly in the more central parts of Australia - cities areas are much easier....just remember to look to the right when crossing roads cos we drive on the other side here in Australia :p

    also, if you're coming in from tullamarine there's a bus service called skybus that runs from the airport to the city at southern cross station and is about 1-2 blocks away from the hotel ibis melbourne.

    Thanks for the heads up! Is it July yet?

  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    Australia day has not come yet so we are still in January.

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • YugYug [ PAX Australia ] Content & Communications Manager AustraliaRegistered User regular
    FatSoDa wrote: »
    Yeah when your in Sydney you only have to worry about funnel webs, brown snakes, magpies, red belly black snake, and the eastern tiger snake.

    Its cool though, you should be fine!

    I've lived here in Sydney for well over a year, and haven't seen a single Funnel web spider.

    Snakes though ... so many snakes.

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  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    just say within the city area :p

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    NB: I AM NOT A LAWYER. All of the things in this post are merely a layman's understanding of the law, and are not meant as legal advice. They may well be inaccurate. There are almost certainly other differences. It is your job to do your own research; these are only intended as a useful 'head-up'.

    For those of you planning on hiring a car and driving on an international license, It's worth noting that we do have a few different road rules:

    - We drive on the left (like the British)
    - Our speed signs (and all road signs) are in KM/h, not Miles/h (like the Europeans)
    - Our alcohol limit is 0.05% BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) - as compared to the US limit of 0.08% BAC
    -- Drink driving / DUI is considered a criminal offence (with mandatory jail time and no option of suspended sentences)
    - Random roadside breathalyser tests are considered normal, and do not require probable cause
    - Red-light-and-speed cameras are considered normal
    - We have hook turns (see above for a description)
    - We have roundabouts (although only really in the suburbs)

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    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
  • SandmanTechSandmanTech MelbourneRegistered User regular
    Just to clarify the above post - as part of a standard procedure, whenever you are pulled over you are subjected to a mandatory breath test.

    There are also random drug tests involving a tongue scrape. This can be at a "booze bus" (that is the official name for the mobile roadside testing stations) or at the police station.

  • thegh0ststhegh0sts Sydney, NSWRegistered User regular
    DaCraw wrote: »
    NB: I AM NOT A LAWYER. All of the things in this post are merely a layman's understanding of the law, and are not meant as legal advice. They may well be inaccurate. There are almost certainly other differences. It is your job to do your own research; these are only intended as a useful 'head-up'.

    For those of you planning on hiring a car and driving on an international license, It's worth noting that we do have a few different road rules:

    - We drive on the left (like the British)
    - Our speed signs (and all road signs) are in KM/h, not Miles/h (like the Europeans)
    - Our alcohol limit is 0.05% BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) - as compared to the US limit of 0.08% BAC
    -- Drink driving / DUI is considered a criminal offence (with mandatory jail time and no option of suspended sentences)
    - Random roadside breathalyser tests are considered normal, and do not require probable cause
    - Red-light-and-speed cameras are considered normal
    - We have hook turns (see above for a description)
    - We have roundabouts (although only really in the suburbs)

    1. not just the UK but HK, Japan, NZ.
    2. We use the metric system over empirical. only 3 countries in the world still use empirical and none of them are EU countries (US, Liberia, Myanmar)
    3. ---
    4. ---
    5. ---
    6. ---
    7. ---
    8. i believe they're called rotaries in the US

    Next PAX: PAX AUS 2017
    Previous PAXs: PAX Prime 2011, PAX AUS 2013
  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Re 1 and 2: yes, you're right there are many other countries that use the various systems, I was just pointing out examples. As a sidenote, though, they still use Mi instead of Km in the UK, although they use the metric system for almost everything else. Given that the thread is nominally for people coming from the US, the difference in units may be of interest. The examples were just for people who have also traveled elsewhere.

    We do use the metric system for most things (although you can still buy beers in pints).

    DaCraw on
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    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
  • whypick1whypick1 PAX [E] Info Booth Manager ~2' from an LCDRegistered User regular
    thegh0sts wrote: »
    8. i believe they're called rotaries in the US

    "Traffic circle", actually, although dictionary.com says "rotary" is used in the NE US.

    Is it PAX <insert nearest future PAX here> yet?
  • zerzhulzerzhul Registered User, Moderator mod
    Huh, I've always heard them called roundabouts in the US, never heard them called rotaries or traffic circles.

    JenniLyne
  • FatSoDaFatSoDa Professor Doctor AustraliaRegistered User regular
    Notice you didn't say anything about Magpies though, the true villain of the piece if you ask me.
    Yug wrote: »
    FatSoDa wrote: »
    Yeah when your in Sydney you only have to worry about funnel webs, brown snakes, magpies, red belly black snake, and the eastern tiger snake.

    Its cool though, you should be fine!

    I've lived here in Sydney for well over a year, and haven't seen a single Funnel web spider.

    Snakes though ... so many snakes.

    [E]nforcing it Like I stole it
    paxaus.gif

    PAX Aus Enforcer
  • DaCrawDaCraw Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    PAX is in July, well before their breeding season. They usually don't start swooping until late August.

    Rabid Collingwood wood supporters, however ...

    (The Magpies is the main nickname for the Collingwood Football Club, an AFL team. Their supporters can have something of an infamous reputation, depending on who you ask).

    DaCraw on
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    Avatar is from www.xkcd.com
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