Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Stainless steel cookware maintenance

GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
edited November 2012 in Help / Advice Forum
So some of you remember I posted a thread last week about new cookware, well it's all here! Thanks Amazon Prime.

My question is day to day and preventive maintenance on this stuff. Can I do day to day cleaning with regular soap and water? Do I need to use Barkeepers Friend every time, or just when I want to get hard water/cooking stains off the metal? They say dishwasher safe, but part of me gets the impression it's better to hand wash and dry them immediately after use, in terms of longevity?

Other than cooking with a lot of oil/fat/butter when things might stick, and not cooking on super high temps, is there anything else I need to know to not warp/ruin this stuff?

Sagroth wrote: »
Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
GnomeTank on

Posts

  • KalTorakKalTorak Way up inside your butthole, Morty. WAAAAY up inside there.Registered User regular
    I've run my stainless steel pan through the dishwasher, handwashed with regular dishsoap, Barkeeper's friend when there's a stain or something. The thing has been pretty resilient so far (other than some baked on coloring on the bottom that I don't care about).

  • WildEEPWildEEP Registered User regular
    Dishwasher is fine for stainless steel - set it to energy save dry so it doesn't bake the dishes after the wash.
    Jet dry cuts down on the water spots.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Regular soap and water is fine. Dishwasher is fine. In general I've never had anything stick to stainless that couldnt be resolved with hot water and dish soap soaking. Also, i wouldn't worry about things sticking too much.

    mrt144 on
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Except tomato sauce you conveniently forgot in the fridge behind tons of other food. Worry about sticking then.

    Ladies.
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against the Irish) Registered User regular
    That's not so much 'sticking' as 'actively resisting eviction.' :P

    bowen
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    That explains the tendrils, but yeah they're super easy to clean gnome.

    Being dishwashed like they don't give a fuck.

    Ladies.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    I'm not sure that I would ever leave tomato sauce in my relatively expensive pans at the back of the fridge, but if I ever do, I will keep that in mind!

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    I use gladware and stuff to store food.

  • KruiteKruite Registered User regular
    Avoid using metal utensils on the surface. It's not a cardinal sin for stainless steel (as it is for coated pans such as teflon), but you will prevent scratches from forming on the surface (which would lead to rusting eventually)

  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    About the only real damage you can do to stainless is burn something onto it, and vinegar will fix that.

  • Mad JazzMad Jazz Registered User regular
    supabeast wrote: »
    About the only real damage you can do to stainless is burn something onto it, and vinegar will fix that.

    Yeah? Just soak for a while and then scrub out? I may have...carbonized some rice when I accidentally turned down the wrong burner...

    camo_sig2.png
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited November 2012
    I have a decent tri-ply Calphelon set, and only hand-wash them. Occasionally use Barkeeper if I want to shine them up. Supposed to be dishwasher safe, but just don't feel like risking it.

    MichaelLC on
    Mugsley wrote:
    So now I need to get it trimmed and adjusted, and all in.

    Steam:MichaelLC
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Mad Jazz wrote: »
    supabeast wrote: »
    About the only real damage you can do to stainless is burn something onto it, and vinegar will fix that.

    Yeah? Just soak for a while and then scrub out? I may have...carbonized some rice when I accidentally turned down the wrong burner...

    Yup. Worst case, scrub the pants out of it with copper wool. Far less scratchy than steel wool. But bartender's helper works too.

    Ladies.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    So I cooked using one of them for the first time last night. Boiled some water for noodles. I immediately washed the pan, and now on the bottom inside of the bottom (where the water/food actually goes), there are these little bright spots. It's hard to explain, I should have taken a picture. The pan is spotless clean, so it's not food particles, and it doesn't seem to be hard water either. It's like the metal itself is just brighter in droplet size patterns. I don't think it functionally effects the pan, but man is it ugly and makes me sad :(

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Sounds like a stain from starchy food.

    Ladies.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    It was noodles I was cooking, so that would make sense. Will Barkeepers take it off? Soap and water didn't.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    It should. Does it have a blueish hue to it?

    If not vinegar at the worst should give it after a soak through (I've seen comments about cooking some tomato sauce to get it off after a vinegar soak and rinse).

    Ladies.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    Yeah, I guess you could say it had a bit of a bluehish hue. The stained areas are really small, like I said droplet size, so it's hard to say.

    For now, it's functionally perfectly fine and is sitting washed and dried in my cabinet. I'll hit it with some Barkeepers next time I use and wash it.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah pretty sure it's a starch stain (probably a noodle smearing itself on the hot surface of the pot while doing the boiling dance). You should be good, probably won't be there forever!

    Ladies.
  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    This isn't so much maintenance, but:

    When cooking really lean ground beef (97/3), should I put anything in the pan first, or will the fat from the ground beef be enough?

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • AkilaeAkilae Registered User regular
    It will not be enough. You should add some oil.

  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    If you want to be super health conscious, you can use a spray to make the oil coating as thin as possible, but generally you always want some oil on the pan. Bacon is the only thing that comes to mind that I might not bother oiling the pan for.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    edited December 2012
    No spray (I'll buy some next time I'm at the store), so I'll use a bit of oil and a paper towel to spread it around.

    GnomeTank on
    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • AkilaeAkilae Registered User regular
    I'm probably dense, but there's nothing wrong with a normal oil/fat intake. It's not like you're chugging the stuff or deep frying your burger patty.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    The idea is just to lubricate my cookware, not really cook with the oil. I'm not adverse to some fat intake, but no reason to just douse the pan in oil.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    Are you making burgers, meatballs or a Salisbury steak type thing, or just browning loose meat?

    The problem with such lean meat is that it will likely stick if you are trying to brown it.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    I'm browning it, but I coated the pan first.

    My next question is, I am about to put this in some sauce to simmer, should I coat the pan it's going to simmer in? I am watching it, so I won't be letting it burn on there or anything.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    GnomeTank wrote: »
    I'm browning it, but I coated the pan first.

    My next question is, I am about to put this in some sauce to simmer, should I coat the pan it's going to simmer in? I am watching it, so I won't be letting it burn on there or anything.

    Nope, no need to do that.

  • GnomeTankGnomeTank Registered User regular
    Well I did anyway, just to be safe. A little oil won't hurt the sauce, but I'll know for next time.

    Sagroth wrote: »
    Oh c'mon FyreWulff, no one's gonna pay to visit Uranus.
    Steam: Brainling, XBL / PSN: GnomeTank, NintendoID: Brainling, FF14: Zillius Rosh SFV: Brainling
  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    When cooking non-liquids, the oil does more than just help prevent sticking. It provides a more efficient way for the heat to transfer from the pan surface to the food.

  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    Was the sauce you made today to go with the ground beef? A meat sauce for pasta, perhaps?

    If so, I highly recommend you heat the sauce in the same pan as the beef after the beef is done browning. (Drain the fat before adding the sauce, if you like.) The sauce will deglaze the pan, meaning it'll dissolve all the brown stuff that stuck to the pan when you cooked your beef. That stuff is delicious and is itself the basis of many sauces.

    By using the sauce to deglaze the pan as you heat it up, you not only make an ordinary jar of sauce from the store far more delicious, you make cleaning the pan a lot easier afterward.

    mrt144TychoCelchuuu
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited December 2012
    deglaze with anything acidic or alcoholic or stocky.

    mrt144 on
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    Personally I would use 15-20% fat ground meat for browning and then drain. If using 3% fat meat I'd put in some oil for browning and drain when it's cooked enough for the next step.

    When adding your sauce you don't need to add oil (unless you want that oil in the sauce). The issue with lean meat is particular to cooking a very high protein and low moisture/fat ingredient.

    As said earlier, deglaze with your sauce/stock to get the nice brown bits into the sauce.

Sign In or Register to comment.