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The D&D [Book] Thread

145791099

Posts

  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    I think the Death Gate Cycle was the first series I read where I felt like the magic system at play was almost more interesting than the story. It had such definitive rules and all those charts in the back explaining how shit worked...I fucking loved that stuff.

    I still think books 1, 3 and 5 are the best ones in that series. The realization of how necromancy worked, and everything with Hugh the Hand and Bane (that was the kid's name, yeah?) was great. And yes, the last two books were a mess.

    skippydumptruckDissociater
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    But it's sooooooo gooooooood.

    It's a "marmite" book; people either adore it or despise it.

    I'm OK with that. Beats the shit out of 'inoffensive' any day.

    I think it's one of the funniest and most enjoyable books I've ever read; I actively enjoy reading footnotes, and I'm quite comfortable with the slightly archaic tone she uses. Clarke's ultra-dry, straightfaced, sideways-glance humour is precisely my kind of thing:

    “Can a magician kill a man by magic?” Lord Wellington asked Strange. Strange frowned. He seemed to dislike the question. “I suppose a magician might,” he admitted, “but a gentleman never would.”

    Plus you can tell that she really likes her characters, and that shows through and then it's hard for me not to like them too.

  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    Is it a one-off? I wanted to read it ages ago and never did. But after finishing this trilogy I'm on now, I'd really like to read a book that tells one single story and is done. No sequels, no books 2 and 3 and 10 or whatever.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I seem to be a sucker for Napoleonic based fantasy. The uses for war in Strange & Norrel and Temeraire always grab me.

    V1m
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Is it a one-off? I wanted to read it ages ago and never did. But after finishing this trilogy I'm on now, I'd really like to read a book that tells one single story and is done. No sequels, no books 2 and 3 and 10 or whatever.

    The book itself tells a complete (though very long) story. I believe she's writing a sequel but only in a sense that it's set in the same world and following the stories of new characters a few years after the events of the last book.

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    I started The Warded Man (or, The Painted Man if you are not in the US)

    the story seems interesting but the writing is dreadful

    should I eject y/n

    Tiger Burning
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    I started The Warded Man (or, The Painted Man if you are not in the US)

    the story seems interesting but the writing is dreadful

    should I eject y/n

    I second this question as I've had that book hanging around my Amazon wishlist forever but could never decide if I ought to pull the trigger on it.

    @ElJeffe

    Johnathan Strange & Mr. Norrel isn't a novel so much as it is a memoir or a biography of two people who don't exist. It is almost exactly what you would get if England had a history of wizards and some academic type wrote about a particular pair of recent magicians' lives near the turn of the 20th century (if I'm remembering the period correctly). It's weird and absolutely not for everyone, but it is pretty neat if you can get through it. The dryness never goes away and it never has what I would call a 'story'. It just sort of exists.

    If you liked the world but couldn't get through the density, try The Ladies of Grace Adieu by the same author. It's a short collection of even shorter stories set in the same world but reads more like a turn-of-the-century fairy tale compilation. Bizarro Grimm's, if you will.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    CommunistCow
  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    Finished off the Night Angel trilogy just now. I read through it all in about 3 weeks, so it definitely grabbed me, but I'm feeling kinda blah about the ending. I'm not sure exactly what I want to read next, except that I definitely don't want to read another trilogy or fantasy for a while.

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    Finished off the Night Angel trilogy just now. I read through it all in about 3 weeks, so it definitely grabbed me, but I'm feeling kinda blah about the ending. I'm not sure exactly what I want to read next, except that I definitely don't want to read another trilogy or fantasy for a while.
    Any idea what the deal was with
    The King suddenly having magic green burn powers from when the mysterious geothermal monster (dragon?) bled on him?

    Was it a plothook that the author suddenly remembered at the end? It really came out of nowhere.

    But yes, those books are super readable.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    And wait 20 pages in? Aren't the story and characters at that point pretty much just the magical historians arguing over history?

    Yeah, probably. Maybe I read further. When I stopped, it was sort of hinting at the story to come, and it was a compelling world, but I don't have a lot of time to read, and I'd rather get through three pretty good books than one pretty good book.

    The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, on the other hand, was just as long, but I could not put that shit down. That's the sort of quality that is required to get me to commit to a 800 page book.

    I need to read Kavalier and Clay again, I think I was too young to appreciate it when I first read it (I was 20 at the time).

    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • Tiger BurningTiger Burning Dig if you will, the pictureRegistered User, SolidSaints Tube regular
    I started The Warded Man (or, The Painted Man if you are not in the US)

    the story seems interesting but the writing is dreadful

    should I eject y/n

    I got to the 2nd chapter of the 2nd book (I finished the first!) and nearly choked to death on some piece of dialogue.

    I gave up.

    Ain't no particular sign I'm more compatible with
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    And wait 20 pages in? Aren't the story and characters at that point pretty much just the magical historians arguing over history?

    Yeah, probably. Maybe I read further. When I stopped, it was sort of hinting at the story to come, and it was a compelling world, but I don't have a lot of time to read, and I'd rather get through three pretty good books than one pretty good book.

    The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, on the other hand, was just as long, but I could not put that shit down. That's the sort of quality that is required to get me to commit to a 800 page book.

    I need to read Kavalier and Clay again, I think I was too young to appreciate it when I first read it (I was 20 at the time).

    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    I thought Snuff was just okay. Very enjoyable, like all Pratchett's books, but he peaked around Thud and Thief of Time and the magic isn't quite there anymore. I still devour any new Pratchett works that come down the pike, though.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Finished off the Night Angel trilogy just now. I read through it all in about 3 weeks, so it definitely grabbed me, but I'm feeling kinda blah about the ending. I'm not sure exactly what I want to read next, except that I definitely don't want to read another trilogy or fantasy for a while.
    Any idea what the deal was with
    The King suddenly having magic green burn powers from when the mysterious geothermal monster (dragon?) bled on him?

    Was it a plothook that the author suddenly remembered at the end? It really came out of nowhere.

    But yes, those books are super readable.

    It's mentioned somewhere in book 2 that
    Logan came out of The Hole with some kind of weird tattoo, and someone tells him he ought to cover it up. Nothing more is made of it, other than Logan thinking about it itching or something like that once or twice. Then at the end when Moburu is all "I'm the High King because magic dragon shit", Logan's tattoo is revealed to look like a dragon, which I don't think we knew before. Yeah, it felt a bit sloppy when everything else seemed to have been put together pretty well without leaving threads hanging.

  • DissociaterDissociater Registered User regular
    I think the Death Gate Cycle was the first series I read where I felt like the magic system at play was almost more interesting than the story. It had such definitive rules and all those charts in the back explaining how shit worked...I fucking loved that stuff.

    I still think books 1, 3 and 5 are the best ones in that series. The realization of how necromancy worked, and everything with Hugh the Hand and Bane (that was the kid's name, yeah?) was great. And yes, the last two books were a mess.

    I still quite enjoyed the last two books and how they brought things together, although book 2 and 5 were always my favourites. I feel like it was the first series I read where the main character had a real arc and became a different person by the end. I liked it enough that I read some of their other series afterwards like the Star [Wars] of the guardian series.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    I was really surprised by Snuff. I remember reading Unseen Academicals and thinking that the combination of his disease and his writing-by-dictation process were finally getting the better of him but Snuff was great.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    edited February 2013
    I think the Death Gate Cycle was the first series I read where I felt like the magic system at play was almost more interesting than the story. It had such definitive rules and all those charts in the back explaining how shit worked...I fucking loved that stuff.

    I still think books 1, 3 and 5 are the best ones in that series. The realization of how necromancy worked, and everything with Hugh the Hand and Bane (that was the kid's name, yeah?) was great. And yes, the last two books were a mess.

    I still quite enjoyed the last two books and how they brought things together, although book 2 and 5 were always my favourites. I feel like it was the first series I read where the main character had a real arc and became a different person by the end. I liked it enough that I read some of their other series afterwards like the Star [Wars] of the guardian series.

    I think I had read all of their Dragonlance stuff to date by that time, and I read the rest of their work as well. I'm still sad that their modern-day dude-who-is-totally-a-dragon trilogy never got past the first book. I can't remember the name of it.

    edit: I settled on Gone Girl for my next book. Almost a fifth of the way in and I'm already fucking depressed, though I can't stop reading.

    Vincent Grayson on
  • rattletraprattletrap Registered User regular
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    When I started Snuff I thought it was going to be just another "fantasy villain becomes contributing member of society" book like they've done with the Trolls, Dwarves, Golems, Orcs, and probably others I've forgotten.

    What I decided by the end was that, although the goblin stuff is the general plot outline that is not what the book is about. It is a novel about how Vimes' character is changing (or not) along with his level of power, and is more of a character-focused book than about any Discworld novel since Night Watch.

    That said, while the book is awesome, the use of Willikins for all kinds of exposition was clunky and the way they resolved the Goblin plot
    with a song
    was a bit of a convenient short-cut for me. Minor flaws in an excellent book.

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    I settled on Gone Girl for my next book. Almost a fifth of the way in and I'm already fucking depressed, though I can't stop reading.

    gone girl is excellent, highly recommend

  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    And wait 20 pages in? Aren't the story and characters at that point pretty much just the magical historians arguing over history?

    Yeah, probably. Maybe I read further. When I stopped, it was sort of hinting at the story to come, and it was a compelling world, but I don't have a lot of time to read, and I'd rather get through three pretty good books than one pretty good book.

    The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, on the other hand, was just as long, but I could not put that shit down. That's the sort of quality that is required to get me to commit to a 800 page book.

    I need to read Kavalier and Clay again, I think I was too young to appreciate it when I first read it (I was 20 at the time).

    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    I thought Snuff was just okay. Very enjoyable, like all Pratchett's books, but he peaked around Thud and Thief of Time and the magic isn't quite there anymore. I still devour any new Pratchett works that come down the pike, though.

    Those are both fantastic books, and while I couldn't finish Unseen Academicals, I really enjoyed the rest after Thud!, especially the two Tiffany Aching books.

    DoctorArch on
    Switch Friend Code: SW-6732-9515-9697
  • CroakerBCCroakerBC YorkRegistered User regular
    I started The Warded Man (or, The Painted Man if you are not in the US)

    the story seems interesting but the writing is dreadful

    should I eject y/n

    Honestly, 'that depends' ; I quite enjoy the ideas in the world, and it works really well as something I can read on the bus to work. It's...very plotty, with a few interesting characters, who don't really transcend the types they're placed into at the start. The writing is not going to get measurably better, either in the rest of the book, or the sequel. But if the world and plot grab you, it's a good brain-off fast read.

  • BogartBogart I Will Cure You Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited February 2013
    After finding out that Peter David, one of my favourite comic book writers, suffered a stroke recently, I figured I could contribute to his health insurance payments by buying a book of his. I've picked up a coy of his Star Trek: New Frontiers books on Kindle, and will give it a shot. Tie in fiction usually brings me out in a rash, but what the hell.

    Bogart on
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    After finding out that Peter David, one of my favourite comic book writers, suffered a stroke recently, I figured I could contribute to his health insurance payments by buying a book of his. I've picked up a coy of his Star Trek: New Frontiers books on Kindle, and will give it a shot. Tie in fiction usually brings me out in a rash, but what the hell.

    Peter David is the master of tie-in fiction. His stuff is usually good fun.

    New Frontier is probably the best Star Trek tie-in fiction, or tied for it. It's like getting a new TV series, except unlike everything after DS9, it doesn't suck.

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    DoctorArch wrote: »
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    And wait 20 pages in? Aren't the story and characters at that point pretty much just the magical historians arguing over history?

    Yeah, probably. Maybe I read further. When I stopped, it was sort of hinting at the story to come, and it was a compelling world, but I don't have a lot of time to read, and I'd rather get through three pretty good books than one pretty good book.

    The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, on the other hand, was just as long, but I could not put that shit down. That's the sort of quality that is required to get me to commit to a 800 page book.

    I need to read Kavalier and Clay again, I think I was too young to appreciate it when I first read it (I was 20 at the time).

    Just finished Pratchett's Snuff. Good book, very very good Discworld novel.

    I thought Snuff was just okay. Very enjoyable, like all Pratchett's books, but he peaked around Thud and Thief of Time and the magic isn't quite there anymore. I still devour any new Pratchett works that come down the pike, though.

    Those are both fantastic books, and while I couldn't finish Unseen Academicals, I really enjoyed the rest after Thud!, especially the two Tiffany Aching books.

    Oh man, I loved the Aching books, and they just kept getting better, and also increasingly D:

    And I seem to be in a minority, but Making Money and Going Postal are two of my very most favoritest. I love reading about Ankh Morpork's industrial revolution, and also anything involving Moist.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • Medium DaveMedium Dave Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    Finished John Meaney's Absorption. Really weird one.

    It has several interweaving stories: a 9th century viking warrior, a female scientist in the late 1920s as the Nazis rise to power, a 2100s explorer making first contact with an alien species, a 2600s young college student who is also an undercover spy... it got weird. And the stories all hook up across space and time somehow and ow my head.

    That sounds like Cloud Atlas 2.

  • Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..." a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
    Going Postal was incredible, but Making Money bored me to tears.

    Steam: Mike Danger | PSN/NNID: remadeking | 3DS: 2079-9204-4075
    oE0mva1.jpg
  • HandgimpHandgimp R+L=J Family PhotoRegistered User regular
    I started The Warded Man (or, The Painted Man if you are not in the US)

    the story seems interesting but the writing is dreadful

    should I eject y/n

    I made it all the way through, but only because I refuse to quit reading a book once I begin (the only exception I've yet made was Atlas Shrugged, and I was only okay doing that because I'd already read Anthem and The Fountainhead).

    I won an autographed copy of the sequel as part of Pat Rothfuss's Worldbuilders thing a year or two back, and to this date have yet to crack the cover.

    PwH4Ipj.jpg
  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    edited February 2013
    I settled on Gone Girl for my next book. Almost a fifth of the way in and I'm already fucking depressed, though I can't stop reading.

    gone girl is excellent, highly recommend

    Man, this book is fucking nuts. Hopefully I can finish it today.

    edit: And done. Holy shit, what the fuck did I just read? I'd take bets on this shit getting turned into a movie within the next few years.

    Vincent Grayson on
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    Bogart wrote: »
    After finding out that Peter David, one of my favourite comic book writers, suffered a stroke recently, I figured I could contribute to his health insurance payments by buying a book of his. I've picked up a coy of his Star Trek: New Frontiers books on Kindle, and will give it a shot. Tie in fiction usually brings me out in a rash, but what the hell.

    Peter David is the master of tie-in fiction. His stuff is usually good fun.

    New Frontier is probably the best Star Trek tie-in fiction, or tied for it. It's like getting a new TV series, except unlike everything after DS9, it doesn't suck.

    So this is why his manuscripts are so late, poor dude. I need to tell my boss. I hope he gets better, regardless.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    Started on Leviathan Wakes, by James S. A. Corey (apparently the pen name of Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck).

    Liking it a lot so far. It feels like the same kind of dirty and violent stuff going on in Richard Morgan's and Neal Asher's stuff, while at the same time being future-noir stuff that reminds me of Bladerunner aesthetics translated to space colonies inside hollowed-out asteroids.

    Wikipedia's blurb because I'm lazy:
    Leviathan Wakes follows the character of Jim Holden, one of many citizens that have spread out over the solar system and inhabiting the surrounding planets. Holden makes his living as an ice miner that accidentally comes across the remains of the Scopuli. It's on this ship that they discover a secret that people are willing to kill and start wars for. At the same time, Detective Miller is searching for the daughter of a rich couple, his investigation bringing him to Holden and the remains of the Scopuli. The two men must work together to find out what is going on and keep themselves and everyone else alive.

    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
    CroakerBC
  • Thorn413Thorn413 Registered User regular
    I recently started using Audible which has led to me getting caught up on a lot of books I have been meaning to read for a while.

    The first one I picked up wasAltered Carbon, a sci-fi book that had a realy interesting setting involving transhumanism/the digitization of human consciousness, unfortunately the feel of the book is just about as boilerplate mystery/thriller as humanly possible and the protagonist can become a bit of a Mary Sue at times. Still it is a fun enough read, if the idea of transhumanism interests you it is certainly worth a read.

    Currently I am reading 'The Mote in God's Eye which I am enjoying much more than I thought I would (I picked it up mainly because it was on sale). I am sure there are many novels that deal with the main thrust of the book (mankind's first contact with alien life), but approaches the idea in a way I have not seen before in that a) human beings are the ones who discover and send ambassadors to the aliens rather than the other way around and b) it is not entirely clear whether the humans are more advanced than the aliens or vice versa. So far it is a very interesting Sci Fi story while also being a very readable one.

  • BogartBogart I Will Cure You Registered User, Moderator mod
    Finished House of Cards, the first New Frontiers book. It was ok.

    Using 'literally' three times in the first couple of chapters is eye-rollingly sloppy, though. It's tie in fiction, the sausage and mash comfort food of SF.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Bogart wrote: »
    Finished House of Cards, the first New Frontiers book. It was ok.

    Using 'literally' three times in the first couple of chapters is eye-rollingly sloppy, though. It's tie in fiction, the sausage and mash comfort food of SF.

    Man. I don't know that I could handle one 'literally' outside of dialog or first-person narration. That's like exclamation marks in prose levels, there.

    CptHamilton on
    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    Bogart
  • PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    Started on Leviathan Wakes, by James S. A. Corey (apparently the pen name of Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck).

    Liking it a lot so far. It feels like the same kind of dirty and violent stuff going on in Richard Morgan's and Neal Asher's stuff, while at the same time being future-noir stuff that reminds me of Bladerunner aesthetics translated to space colonies inside hollowed-out asteroids.

    Wikipedia's blurb because I'm lazy:
    Leviathan Wakes follows the character of Jim Holden, one of many citizens that have spread out over the solar system and inhabiting the surrounding planets. Holden makes his living as an ice miner that accidentally comes across the remains of the Scopuli. It's on this ship that they discover a secret that people are willing to kill and start wars for. At the same time, Detective Miller is searching for the daughter of a rich couple, his investigation bringing him to Holden and the remains of the Scopuli. The two men must work together to find out what is going on and keep themselves and everyone else alive.

    The sequel is even better. I actually had a hard time with the first book. It took me halfway into it to realize Holden and crew were meant to be "Whedonesque." I was reading their dialogue straight, and it was really throwing my opinion of the book.

  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    The sequel is even better. I actually had a hard time with the first book. It took me halfway into it to realize Holden and crew were meant to be "Whedonesque." I was reading their dialogue straight, and it was really throwing my opinion of the book.

    "That man could take a visitation from God with thirty underdressed angels announcing that sex was okay after all and make it seem vaguely depressing."

    On to the next book, Caliban's War!

    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
  • Wooden SpoonWooden Spoon Great for SaucesRegistered User regular
    I want to ask this here, because my occasional lurking in this thread has yet to steer me wrong. I'm on the cusp of finishing the Malazan series, and I've greatly enjoyed it. What would be a good followup? I'd like something thematically similar, but less lengthy. My work schedule doesn't permit me to plow through these long sagas as quickly anymore. Thanks!

    FFXIV:Iadrich Loffel
    Wooden Spoon on Steam
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  • PhillisherePhillishere Registered User regular
    I want to ask this here, because my occasional lurking in this thread has yet to steer me wrong. I'm on the cusp of finishing the Malazan series, and I've greatly enjoyed it. What would be a good followup? I'd like something thematically similar, but less lengthy. My work schedule doesn't permit me to plow through these long sagas as quickly anymore. Thanks!

    Have you read the Black Company books? They're a close set with Malazan.

  • Wooden SpoonWooden Spoon Great for SaucesRegistered User regular
    They were my last read immediately prior to the Malazan series. I think I've liked Malazan better, with the possible exception of just the first three from The Black Company.

    FFXIV:Iadrich Loffel
    Wooden Spoon on Steam
    3DS: 1005-8709-0277
    rattletrap
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited February 2013
    I'm just about to finish up Room (which was amazing all the way through, even if the final act seems to just wobble on for awhile and then stop, unless something crazy happens in the final 5 pages), and then I will start Mark Z Danielewski's The Fifty Year Sword, which looks somewhere between House of Leaves and Only Revolutions in terms of bat-shit crazy formatting.

    ElJeffe on
    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • AresProphetAresProphet I see a darkness in my fate I'll drive my car without the brakesRegistered User regular
    Started reading Dan Simmons' Flashback
    ...alright when did he go over the deep end? When did he lose the plot completely? When did he decide to use a thin veil of plot to hide his curmudgeonliness and hatred of everything?

    It is, and it shames me to say this about a Simmons book, it is poorly written. Characterization is unsubtle and stereotypical. Setting is overly described (I too live in Denver, Dan. So do about 2 million other people. We appreciate that you're very familiar with all of the nuance and history of the city, but really? really?). Dialogue is, well, unremarkable. Simmons typically does great dialogue.

    I will finish it in hopes that it redeems itself (or mocks itself, perhaps) but halfway through and so far this feels like a great writer trying to write down to the level of airport fiction.

    oh, gimme some time
    show me the foothold from which I can climb
    yeah, when I feel low
    you show me a signpost for where I should go
    Dizzy D
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Dan Simmons is really odd. Like even for a two-parter Ilium was kind of amazing and then Olympos was just complete ass (or was it the other way around?). And then he's got the highs of Hyperion which is eventually concluded by Fall of Endymion, AKA some random guy's rambling blog post about religion

    Kana on
    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
    Mike DangerAresProphet
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