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The D&D [Book] Thread

1246799

Posts

  • Uncle_BalsamicUncle_Balsamic Registered User regular
    Finished Infinite Jest today. Thinking of moving on to either Gravity's Rainbow or maybe Crash.

    PQdy61j.jpg
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Moderator mod
    Downbelow Station was just such a weird book. It was like reading a four-hundred-page wikipedia summary of a much longer book, and I kept feeling like I should be interested in this stuff, conceptually, but I wasn't. Everything felt like it was happening at a remove.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    That's been my reaction to alot of C. J. Cherryh's work. It seems like it should be cool, but the execution is ... off.

  • TurksonTurkson Near the mountains of ColoradoRegistered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    That's been my reaction to alot of C. J. Cherryh's work. It seems like it should be cool, but the execution is ... off.

    I picked up one of her books, The Paladin, because of recommendations on another forum. It's fantasy, but it was a slog and boring to read. I may try another of her books, but this one was disappointing.

    I'm almost finished with the first book of Malazan Book of the Fallen series. If this is the worst of the batch, I'm very excited to read the rest!

    We missed a few places...
    A Dabble Of Thelonius
  • KalkinoKalkino Buttons Londres Registered User regular
    I just rediscovered the small joys of second hand book store shopping.

    I picked up a couple of random books that I would have never considered otherwise, one about a historix British fraudster MP called Trebitsch Lincoln and an early 80s textbook/study on communal identity formation

    Freedom for the Northern Isles!
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    I shall have to read the Miles Vorkosigan series, jacob. My brother has been trying to get me to read them for a long time, but I've been reticent - our tastes don't really overlap all that much. Hearing that it's similar to Babylon 5 makes me far more willing to give it a chance.

    I've also been in the middle of the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson.

    The first (Red Mars), I quite liked. Very dry and technical, to be sure. But compelling in a way.

    With Green Mars, I have stalled. My memory says there were a few dozen people to keep track of and it wasn't really grabbing me. Is it worth pushing through and on to Blue Mars?

  • [Tycho?][Tycho?] Registered User regular
    Tamin wrote: »
    I shall have to read the Miles Vorkosigan series, jacob. My brother has been trying to get me to read them for a long time, but I've been reticent - our tastes don't really overlap all that much. Hearing that it's similar to Babylon 5 makes me far more willing to give it a chance.

    I've also been in the middle of the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson.

    The first (Red Mars), I quite liked. Very dry and technical, to be sure. But compelling in a way.

    With Green Mars, I have stalled. My memory says there were a few dozen people to keep track of and it wasn't really grabbing me. Is it worth pushing through and on to Blue Mars?

    I would say yes. I really adored that series the first time through. The science talk from the first book mostly turns to politics by the third. Admittedly I re-read Red Mars recently and didn't like it nearly as much this time around. I did read that series at lunch hours at a mind-sucking job where these books were my only source of stimulation... so maybe I think too highly of them.

    I don't think there are that many people to keep track of. Maya and Sax, that Russian woman, the big teddy bear guy, the ambitious younger woman, the prodigal son. I don't think a slew of new characters are introduced in the third installment. I'd say go for it. It is rare to find such a completely-imagined and plausible future.

    mvaYcgc.jpg
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Alright. I'll dig through the book boxes and pick it up again.

    Thanks!

    Tamin on
  • AridholAridhol Registered User regular
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

  • chrisnlchrisnl Registered User regular
    Finally finished The Book of the New Sun. I'm not entirely sure what I think of it just yet. I definitely liked the books, but I need more time to digest it all I think.

    steam_sig.png
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    You definitely do. Reread them in a while, and you'll pick up on a bunch of things you didn't the first time.

  • Tiger BurningTiger Burning Dig if you will, the pictureRegistered User, SolidSaints Tube regular
    I finished the first in the Mongoliad series, Stephenson's collaborative thing, and started the second. The first was not too bad. Serviceable prose and an interesting concept. Characters were mostly dull, but not, for the most part, two-dimensional. The hyper-detailed descriptions of swordplay were strangely compelling. Normally I just skim through fight scenes in books, but here they (and one in particular) were probably the highlight.

    Ain't no particular sign I'm more compatible with
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    edited January 2013
    I finished the first in the Mongoliad series, Stephenson's collaborative thing, and started the second. The first was not too bad. Serviceable prose and an interesting concept. Characters were mostly dull, but not, for the most part, two-dimensional. The hyper-detailed descriptions of swordplay were strangely compelling. Normally I just skim through fight scenes in books, but here they (and one in particular) were probably the highlight.

    Echo on
    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
    Tiger Burning
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    I am reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

    It is stressing me out because I totally identify with the main character - fat, nerdy, working class, immigrant, shit with girls - and it's made clear from the first few pages that his life is going to be brief.

    It also makes Ready Player One look like the pandering crap I thought it was.

    I figure I could take a bear.
    Medium Dave
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    Finished Wool last night.

    The "twist", for what it was, was spotted from a mile away, but the twist didn't really feel like a major part of the story anyway - the characters did.

    Very interesting setting though, I definitely thought of
    several of the vault experiments in Fallout 3/New Vegas

    while reading.

    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
  • Tiger BurningTiger Burning Dig if you will, the pictureRegistered User, SolidSaints Tube regular
    The Mongoliad: The Trailer, by Neal Stephenson, by Wes Anderson

    Ain't no particular sign I'm more compatible with
    AresProphet
  • fshavlakfshavlak Registered User regular
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    A friend lent me some books in Ciaphas Cain series. It's set in the warhammer universe, so I wasn't expecting them to be very readable. I was very pleasantly surprised, and wound up chewing through them like crazy. I'd say they're about on the same level as Dresden for some good mindless fun.

    Captain Marcus
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    How do you feel about British people? If you're okay with them you might try Ben Aaronovich's Rivers of London/Midnight Riot (they're the same book, published under different names in the UK/US) or Mike Carey's The Devil You Know. Both have the sort of dark-with-humor vibe from the later Dresden Files books.

    There's also Tad Williams' The Dirty Streets of Heaven, which isn't as well written but is generally less grave than the other two. His stand-alone book from a few years ago, War of the Flowers is also quite good urban fantasy.

    Simon R Green does the whole urban fantasy thing okay but I'd recommend constraining yourself to maybe a handful of his books spread across his various series (Something From the Nightside, for example, being a good place to start). His stories from years ago were pretty well paced and exciting with a healthy dash of wit but he's always been repetitive and in recent years has just run out of plot and characterization, leaving his newer books as sequences of set-pieces and scenes with little or no connection to one another.

    Liz Williams' series, beginning with Snake Agent, is a bit more seriusbizness than Dresden and not as well paced but is still a fun read and, if nothing else, is a very different take on urban fantasy than any of the above folks.

    Mike Shevdon's Sixty-One Nails is a really stellar first novel urban fantasy and the follow-up The Road To Bedlam is pretty good. I'd recommend both, but would warn in the strongest terms available to stop there as his third, Strangeness and Charm is absolutely unreadable.

    Kim Harrison's grown-up series, starting with Dead Witch Walking, is good enough that I haven't given up on it yet despite the last four or so books (of, I think, eleven) falling more toward trashy romance than urban fantasy. It's probably the most similar to Dresden in terms of content, though the author is a lot more focused on romance and sexytimes than Butcher.

    Edit for three more I thought of too late:

    If you want balls-to-the-wall ridiculousness, you might try Blood Oath by Christopher Farnsworth. It's basically a fantasy action movie in book form. At one point people run and then jump through the air, propelled by the building exploding behind them. It's that kind of thing. I haven't brought myself to read the sequel but I've heard that it's similar.

    It's not a series (as yet), but The Rook: A Novel by Daniel O'Malley is another in the good-if-you-like-Brits section (it's a rollicking good urban fantasy which inexplicably has a bunch of boring correspondence sections thrown in (okay, it's explicable, but it was a poor choice on the part of Mr. O'Malley and I have hopes he won't repeat it in the sequel)).

    Some people have reported satisfaction with Kevin Hearne's Iron Druid Chronciles, beginning with Hounded, but I really didn't care for the first one at all. It was just too pandering. But if you're not put off by superhero-ultraman main characters, talking dogs, and an endless sequence of ever-more-devestatingly-sexy women it might do for you.

    CptHamilton on
    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    There's a series that starts with Greywalker (Kat Richardson) in the urban fantasy vein.

    It's been many years since I read it, and I have little memory of it. I do seem to recall it being a pretty easy read.

    I would check, but my copy was lent to a coworker shortly before I moved, never to be seen again.

    edit: The genre isn't something I usually read. I picked it up as a favor to the author, as she was a regular on a forum I used to visit. For all I know, she still posts there.

    Tamin on
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    re-started Wolf Hall the other day

    I'm not in love with the writing style mostly, but there have been a couple of times where I stopped because a paragraph was so good

  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    The Garrett Files by Glen Cook. They are an homage to the Nero Wolf books but set in a fantasy setting. Very film noir. Much lighter then his Black Company series.

    GrisloBobCesca
  • CroakerBCCroakerBC YorkRegistered User regular
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    The Garrett Files by Glen Cook. They are an homage to the Nero Wolf books but set in a fantasy setting. Very film noir. Much lighter then his Black Company series.

    This is true, and usually I'm the first to recommend Garrett to anyone, but it doesn't have the same vibe as Jim Butcher's work, to me. It's more...studied, a different blend of investigation and plotting, with a bit more deduction and a few less streetfights with vampires.
    Held off on noting Midnight Riot, for the same reason. But both series are excellent.

    There do appear to be a lot of London-centric supernatural mysteries about at the moment, which is nice (well, UK centric would be better, but you can't have everything).

    One I'd forgotten, but is worth the read, just from a genre history point of view, is Emma Bull's The War for the Oaks, which can make a tolerable claim to being the first 'urban fantasy', and does it surprisingly well.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Ghosts in the Snow by Tamara Jones is also great noir fantasy. More grounded than the Garrett books. It's really a shame that the author decided that being a writer was too stressful after 3 books. Though she has apparently done a couple of epub short stories lately, so maybe she'll eventually do a 4th book. Neither series is really very Dresden-y, though.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    CroakerBC wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    The Garrett Files by Glen Cook. They are an homage to the Nero Wolf books but set in a fantasy setting. Very film noir. Much lighter then his Black Company series.

    This is true, and usually I'm the first to recommend Garrett to anyone, but it doesn't have the same vibe as Jim Butcher's work, to me. It's more...studied, a different blend of investigation and plotting, with a bit more deduction and a few less streetfights with vampires.
    Held off on noting Midnight Riot, for the same reason. But both series are excellent.

    There do appear to be a lot of London-centric supernatural mysteries about at the moment, which is nice (well, UK centric would be better, but you can't have everything).

    One I'd forgotten, but is worth the read, just from a genre history point of view, is Emma Bull's The War for the Oaks, which can make a tolerable claim to being the first 'urban fantasy', and does it surprisingly well.

    Yes but he's usually in over his head, dealing with people far more powerful then himself and having to get by quite a bit on his wits. He never really increases in power level since he's just a private investigator. It feels a bit more like the early Dresdan books but with better writing.

  • Squid56Squid56 Registered User regular
    On a whim I recently read the first two books in the Joe Ledger series by Johnatan Maberry. It's pulp, but a fun exciting romp/yarn for sure. Incidentally, I mistakenly read the second before the first, which spoiled some things, but my overall impression was I liked the 2nd one better. They are current day, high science disguised as magic sort of stories and while certainly far fetched, it was engaging. I've been meaning to point them out here, as I've never seen anyone mention them.

  • CroakerBCCroakerBC YorkRegistered User regular
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    CroakerBC wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    The Garrett Files by Glen Cook. They are an homage to the Nero Wolf books but set in a fantasy setting. Very film noir. Much lighter then his Black Company series.

    This is true, and usually I'm the first to recommend Garrett to anyone, but it doesn't have the same vibe as Jim Butcher's work, to me. It's more...studied, a different blend of investigation and plotting, with a bit more deduction and a few less streetfights with vampires.
    Held off on noting Midnight Riot, for the same reason. But both series are excellent.

    There do appear to be a lot of London-centric supernatural mysteries about at the moment, which is nice (well, UK centric would be better, but you can't have everything).

    One I'd forgotten, but is worth the read, just from a genre history point of view, is Emma Bull's The War for the Oaks, which can make a tolerable claim to being the first 'urban fantasy', and does it surprisingly well.

    Yes but he's usually in over his head, dealing with people far more powerful then himself and having to get by quite a bit on his wits. He never really increases in power level since he's just a private investigator. It feels a bit more like the early Dresdan books but with better writing.

    For what it's worth, I completely agree - I don't know why I'm thinking this, but in my head, the Garrett books are more, tonally, like Casablanca, and the Dresden Files are more Die Hard. Both are good (and despite my affection for the early Dresden files, I think the Garrett ones are better), but I'm not sure liking one necessarily transfers to liking the other, if that makes sense?

    Oh, Tim Pratt's Marla Mason books, starting with Blood Engines, are total popcorn commute reading, but they're decent.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Squid56 wrote: »
    On a whim I recently read the first two books in the Joe Ledger series by Johnatan Maberry. It's pulp, but a fun exciting romp/yarn for sure. Incidentally, I mistakenly read the second before the first, which spoiled some things, but my overall impression was I liked the 2nd one better. They are current day, high science disguised as magic sort of stories and while certainly far fetched, it was engaging. I've been meaning to point them out here, as I've never seen anyone mention them.

    So...how pulpy are we talking here? I looked it up on Amazon and it sounds like Tom Clancy Discovers Zombies. I was about to give it a go anyway but the ebook is $10. There any authors you can compare it to?

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • CaedwyrCaedwyr Registered User regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    Can anyone recommend any sites for reading reviews or finding new releases? Living where I do, I don't hear about new books or new authors. I don't even hear about new books by my favourite authors. So sometimes I find myself trawling Amazon for ideas, which can't be the best way to do this.

    I mostly read classics and F/SF, so of course it's the latter I find myself hunting for info on.

    You might want to consider checking out Thewertzone. It's a blog, but he actually gets quoted a decent amount of the time on the back of books and I've found his reviews to be well written for the most part, and fair in their criticism. I've been turned onto a number of good books and authors by this blog.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    CroakerBC wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    CroakerBC wrote: »
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Just finished the latest book in the Dresden files and I'm looking for more of the same type of thing.

    Easy reading, semi-witty/witty dialog, good vs. evil, humanity yay!

    Recommendations?
    Also, is there a site like Jinni but for books? (Jinni is basically a movie recommend site "Find me more like x, Find me movies with x"

    The Garrett Files by Glen Cook. They are an homage to the Nero Wolf books but set in a fantasy setting. Very film noir. Much lighter then his Black Company series.

    This is true, and usually I'm the first to recommend Garrett to anyone, but it doesn't have the same vibe as Jim Butcher's work, to me. It's more...studied, a different blend of investigation and plotting, with a bit more deduction and a few less streetfights with vampires.
    Held off on noting Midnight Riot, for the same reason. But both series are excellent.

    There do appear to be a lot of London-centric supernatural mysteries about at the moment, which is nice (well, UK centric would be better, but you can't have everything).

    One I'd forgotten, but is worth the read, just from a genre history point of view, is Emma Bull's The War for the Oaks, which can make a tolerable claim to being the first 'urban fantasy', and does it surprisingly well.

    Yes but he's usually in over his head, dealing with people far more powerful then himself and having to get by quite a bit on his wits. He never really increases in power level since he's just a private investigator. It feels a bit more like the early Dresdan books but with better writing.

    For what it's worth, I completely agree - I don't know why I'm thinking this, but in my head, the Garrett books are more, tonally, like Casablanca, and the Dresden Files are more Die Hard. Both are good (and despite my affection for the early Dresden files, I think the Garrett ones are better), but I'm not sure liking one necessarily transfers to liking the other, if that makes sense?

    Oh, Tim Pratt's Marla Mason books, starting with Blood Engines, are total popcorn commute reading, but they're decent.

    Because the Garrett books are an homage to a Noir detective series. And Cook tends to play that up a bit. I think Butcher was trying for a bit of that feel in the early Dresden books, didn't feel like he succeeded and dropped it.

  • Squid56Squid56 Registered User regular
    @CptHamilton - Not my usual cup of tea so it's hard for me to make a comparison, I'm actually drawing a complete blank, although your description of Tom Clancy meets Zombies is pretty accurate. It's been a long time since I've read Clancy, but I think I liked Maberry's prose better. I feel like I'm falling down the subjective rabbit hole :)

    What made me think of them is all the talk of the Dresden books, which I haven't read (did watch the SciFi show) but people's descriptions of those books would be how I would describe the Joe Ledger series in terms of quality/pulpiness. I believe I actually got the first one on sale at Audible for $5 during one of their 'pick from these 100 books' sales.

  • CommunistCowCommunistCow Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    I'm currently audio booking Ernest Cline's Ready Player One which is read by Wil Wheaton and I'm still reading Oryx and Crake. I've found it is a little difficult to explain to people the differences between these future dystopias.

    <3s for Wil Wheaton.

    CommunistCow on
    No, I am not really communist. Yes, it is weird that I use this name.
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Caedwyr wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    Can anyone recommend any sites for reading reviews or finding new releases? Living where I do, I don't hear about new books or new authors. I don't even hear about new books by my favourite authors. So sometimes I find myself trawling Amazon for ideas, which can't be the best way to do this.

    I mostly read classics and F/SF, so of course it's the latter I find myself hunting for info on.

    You might want to consider checking out Thewertzone. It's a blog, but he actually gets quoted a decent amount of the time on the back of books and I've found his reviews to be well written for the most part, and fair in their criticism. I've been turned onto a number of good books and authors by this blog.

    Thanks for that. Seems he also reviews television shows and movies, and I enjoyed reading some of those.

    Tamin on
  • GrudgeGrudge Far Beyond DrivenRegistered User regular
    edited January 2013
    Finished John Scalzi's Old Man's War. Can't say I'm a big fan of military sci-fi. Sure, more fantastical stuff like Rogue Squadron and Warhammer is ok, but as soon as it is supposed to be "future Earth" it almost always starts rubbing me the wrong way. That whole gung-ho, the military is my family, we do as we are told because we're doing it for humanity, and so on. Meh.

    Anyway, it had some interesting ideas, but the both plot and language felt rather shallow.

    Started Red Country. Yay, the Bloody Nine!

    Grudge on
    EchoTiger Burning
  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    I thought the Old Man's War was ok, but getting worse with every single book is not a direction an author should be going in and that's pretty much how I felt with Scalzi before I jumped ship.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    I enjoyed Old Man's War but the rest of Scalzi's books I've read have all felt very...scattered. Like he had too many ideas and too few ways to fit them together into a cohesive package. Redshirts mostly overcame that, up until the bizarre ending sequence, but it was satire so didn't really need to be that coherent.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Grudge wrote: »
    Started Red Country. Yay, the Bloody Nine!

    Such a shame that Sam Peckinpah will never make the film of Red Country...

    A Dabble Of Thelonius
  • Ethan SmithEthan Smith Origin name: Beart4to Arlington, VARegistered User regular
    A weird idea--should we make a D&D blogging thread? I read far more blogs than books, and it's easier (for me) to recommend a blog than a book, but it certainly doesn't fit into the purview of the D&D book thread

    I would be ashamed to admit that I had risen from the ranks. When I rise it will be with the ranks, and not from the ranks..
    jakobagger
  • KanaKana Registered User regular
    A weird idea--should we make a D&D blogging thread? I read far more blogs than books, and it's easier (for me) to recommend a blog than a book, but it certainly doesn't fit into the purview of the D&D book thread

    I would like that

    A trap is for fish: when you've got the fish, you can forget the trap. A snare is for rabbits: when you've got the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words are for meaning: when you've got the meaning, you can forget the words.
  • [Tycho?][Tycho?] Registered User regular
    A weird idea--should we make a D&D blogging thread? I read far more blogs than books, and it's easier (for me) to recommend a blog than a book, but it certainly doesn't fit into the purview of the D&D book thread

    Its kinda surprising there isn't one already.

    At this moment I'm looking for english language newspapers from eastern asia that deal with regional or global affairs. Maybe other sorts of media could be involved in this thread? Though it sounds a bit too niche to fit in with a blog thread now that I read the words.

    mvaYcgc.jpg
  • Raiden333Raiden333 Registered User regular
    Just started The Hydrogen Sonata today. 2 questions.

    1. This is my first Iain Banks book and I am LOVING it. Which one should I get next?
    2. Very slight spoiler from like 1/3 of the way through.
    The whole element of "Composer who wrote a musical piece out of spite and sarcasm for his peers' music without any love for the piece, ends up being best known for said piece" thing sounds really familiar. I could swear it happened to someone in real life. Anyone know who?

    steam_sig.png
This discussion has been closed.