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How I do vegetarianism?

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    BenditBendit Cømþü†€r Šýš†emš Anålýš† Ðeñv€r¸ ColørådøRegistered User regular
    Avocadoes provide all 18 essential amino acids necessary for the body to form a complete protein.

    Avocadoes are awesome.

    Nuts also.

    My Live-Tracked Electronica: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhSn2rozrIo
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Yeah - one of my coworkers would constantly douse everything he ate in pepper. When he was asked why on one occasion, he explained that he didn't have much sense of smell, so pepper was one of the only things that let him experience flavor while eating.


    I don't really go for the whole, "Yeah, well you ain't tasted nothin' 'till you tasted [PERSON X'S] cooking! It's the best on the planet!" thing. It's not that I doubt the culinary talents of [PERSON X], it's just that I very rarely have been able to distinguish between a gourmet chef's cooking vs a line chef's cooking. Might just be me.

    With Love and Courage
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    EriosErios Registered User regular
    If you're looking for high quality complete protein with absolutely no question about quantity, well, here you go: bodybuilding.com/store/xf/ultrapeptide2.html

    The cinnamon roll and lemon flavors descended from heaven. Mix in milk and there you go.

    Not saying that to be glib, but if you're not going pure vegan, you can get a great deal of protein from dairy sources or refined dairy sources (like milk, casein and whey). Actually, on a dollar per gram basis, bulk whey may be the cheapest protein source out there, though I prefer casein for lots of reasons. Eggs are also pretty great if you're allowing them (no animals are killed as they aren't actually going to yield chicks, apparently, but there's suffering involving tiny tiny dinosaurs) and are a good way to get some fat in your diet.

    Steam: erios23, Live: Coconut Flavor, Origin: erios2386.
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Also since I was talking about salt on foods. You haven't had corn on the cob until you've had salt on your corn on the cob.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Avocadoes are awesome.

    Nuts also.

    The thing I love about fruits & nuts is that if I don't like the flavor, I can always just add sugar until I taste nothing but sugar. That probably makes me terrible, but hey, at least I'm a terrible person who is eating a clump of nutty brown sugar rather than a beernut. Because beernuts are gross.


    I'm really glad that sugar isn't sentient.

    With Love and Courage
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Pistachios and peanuts are pretty good, though.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Yeah, so are almonds.

    My problem is that somehow I always end-up with the Planter's mixed nuts cans. So I eat the peanuts, the pistachios, the almonds, and sometimes the nondescript round bitter nuts I don't know the name of.

    And then I'm left with like half a tin full of beernuts.

    Thank God for brown sugar.

    With Love and Courage
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    SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    Bendit wrote: »
    Avocadoes provide all 18 essential amino acids necessary for the body to form a complete protein.

    Avocadoes are awesome.

    Technically true, they're rather short on the tryptophan, however, and they're less than 10% protein by weight. Even most legumes will provide you with a higher quantity of those amino acids they generally run short on if you eat an equivalently-sized serving.

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    TL DRTL DR Not at all confident in his reflexive opinions of thingsRegistered User regular
    I've kept a vegetarian diet since 2003 or 2004.

    On 'meat substitutes': generally, they suck and are expensive. Exceptions are black-bean burgers and other delicious foods that aren't really trying to imitate meat, and tofu 'hotdogs' because meat hotdogs are pretty awful to begin with. That said, you may find Boca burgers or whatever to be a handy crutch while transitioning and getting more comfortable feeding yourself.

    On protein: you really don't need that much. As has been said earlier, beans + rice is a complete protein and a staple of most civilizations. Also, chickpeas (garbanzo beans) + tahini (sesame seed paste) are the primary constituents of hummus, which is delicious and snacky and can be made cheap and easy at home. Eggs are another awesome protein source. I like tofu but you'll get sick of it if you try to eat it every day.

    Do you cook much as is? Try not to fall into the trap of just saying "well I can't have this or that, and all we've got otherwise is a box of cookies". For a long time I made a lot of quesadillas:
    -cook a can of black beans in a pot
    -put a little olive oil in a pan, add a tortilla
    -apply cheese; allow to melt
    -add salsa and whatever else. bell pepper and avocado are good options
    -add beans, fold the tortilla, flip once the bottom side has toasted
    Awesome, easy, hot, and nourishing.

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    TL DRTL DR Not at all confident in his reflexive opinions of thingsRegistered User regular
    Avocado is a great food. You'll also want to familiarize yourself with peanut butter. And banana. And god damn it now I'm hungry.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    The Ender wrote: »
    Yeah, so are almonds.

    My problem is that somehow I always end-up with the Planter's mixed nuts cans. So I eat the peanuts, the pistachios, the almonds, and sometimes the nondescript round bitter nuts I don't know the name of.

    And then I'm left with like half a tin full of beernuts.

    Thank God for brown sugar.

    If your supermarket has a bulk foods section head over. Buy gigantic bags of the nuts you like. Buy a Tupperware container. Mix them together.

    Bam.

    Plus you save a ton of money over canned nuts.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    BenditBendit Cømþü†€r Šýš†emš Anålýš† Ðeñv€r¸ ColørådøRegistered User regular
    they're less than 10% protein by weight

    Bummer. I get around that by eating a ƒück†øñ of homemade guacamole. My wife makes a mean guac.

    Fat though right? Yeah, avocadoes are rich indeed.

    I second the black-bean burger patties. Those can be awesome. They can suck and taste like cardboard though. Chili's (the restaurant) used to have an awesome veggie-burger. Not sure if they still do.

    My Live-Tracked Electronica: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhSn2rozrIo
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    _J__J_ Pedant Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    The Ender wrote: »
    Well, the issue is that I have the boycott (I don't particularly care if you're a local farmer; I still think it's unethical to raise for-slaughter livestock). So, when I'm just grabbing my own groceries or whatever, it's simple: I just don't buy any meat. It's when someone else is buying the groceries, or when I'm eating at someone else's place, that just saying no thank you to meats would be simpler than pestering people about where they got [X] meat dish, whether they bought local, etc.

    As a few posters said, I think it's helpful to focus upon one's reasons for doing X, in order to discern whether or not the X-act coheres with one's reasons.

    If you are opposed to raised-for-slaughter livestock, there are still plenty of sources of animal flesh available to you. You don't need to utilize a universal "don't eat meat" rule if your concern is mass production of livestock.

    Another issue is that some of your raised-for-slaughter concerns may apply to mass-produced fruits and vegetables. While we do not consider plants to experience pain, at the moment, there are other ethical issues involved in the mass production of these products, and their impact upon the individual who grow them. If your concern is not the well-being of the plant, or the well-being of the farmers, but rather the well-being of yourself, you may want to look into the various chemicals that are used to grow non-organic produce.

    Your horsey thread indicated that one of your problems is that the label may not correctly correspond to the content of the package. That is an issue that impacts more than just meat. If we cannot trust regulation, then there could be problems with the regulations of chemicals used to produce apples, for example.

    So, that's something to consider. Clearly articulate your reasons for action, and then discern whether your acts actually cohere with the reasons you have set forth. Abandoning meat consumption does not render you immune from the consequences of regulatory mishaps.

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    EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    How exactly do you do tortillas? Unless you are making them yourself they are made with lard or other animal fats en masse.

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    SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    Bendit wrote: »
    they're less than 10% protein by weight

    Bummer. I get around that by eating a ƒück†øñ of homemade guacamole. My wife makes a mean guac.

    Fat though right? Yeah, avocadoes are rich indeed.

    They're about 60% fats by weight and have a ratio of omega-6 fatty acids to the more-beneficial omega-3 fatty acids in excess of 15:1. But they're low in cholesterol, they're low in sodium (mainly because they're potassium-rich) and they're a great source for vitamin K and folate.

    You should definitely eat them, but because the OP has stated an aversion to beans, I want to make sure it's clear that he'd have to eat ten cups of avocados a day to get his daily amino acids, at which point he's getting about 500% of his daily fats. People talk about them like they're miracle foods, but it's probably not a good idea to treat them like a dietary panacea.

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    BenditBendit Cømþü†€r Šýš†emš Anålýš† Ðeñv€r¸ ColørådøRegistered User regular
    Šh¡†! How about grinding/chopping pinenuts (food processor) and adding it to the guacamole? Grinding other nuts in there? The idea is to make a leaner-but-still-healthy-guacamole. What's a lean nut? Yeah, 500% of daily fat is obviouly not recommended. Güå¢åmøl€! Now I am hungry too.

    My Live-Tracked Electronica: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhSn2rozrIo
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    LawndartLawndart Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    The Ender wrote: »
    Yeah, so are almonds.

    My problem is that somehow I always end-up with the Planter's mixed nuts cans. So I eat the peanuts, the pistachios, the almonds, and sometimes the nondescript round bitter nuts I don't know the name of.

    And then I'm left with like half a tin full of beernuts.

    Thank God for brown sugar.

    If your supermarket has a bulk foods section head over. Buy gigantic bags of the nuts you like. Buy a Tupperware container. Mix them together.

    Bam.

    Plus you save a ton of money over canned nuts.

    Also, if your supermarket does not have a bulk foods section, you can order just about any possible nut, roasted or otherwise, salted or otherwise, on the internet.

    TL DR wrote: »
    On 'meat substitutes': generally, they suck and are expensive. Exceptions are black-bean burgers and other delicious foods that aren't really trying to imitate meat, and tofu 'hotdogs' because meat hotdogs are pretty awful to begin with. That said, you may find Boca burgers or whatever to be a handy crutch while transitioning and getting more comfortable feeding yourself.

    The one meat substitute nobody's mentioned yet is seitan, which does a far better job mimicking the texture of meat than tofu does. You might only be able to find it in health food stores and Asian groceries, though.

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    AtomicGaryBuseyAtomicGaryBusey I put on my robe and wizard hat. Beautiful Lynnhood, Wash.Registered User regular
    Lawndart wrote: »
    The one meat substitute nobody's mentioned yet is seitan, which does a far better job mimicking the texture of meat than tofu does. You might only be able to find it in health food stores and Asian groceries, though.

    Seitan (mock duck, etc..) was mentioned. I can find it in my local Safeway, Albertson's, and QFC stores, in addition to Whole Foods and other health food markets. It's actually cheaper at Safeway than at any other store for me, including the specialty stores.


    The Ender wrote: »
    The thing I love about fruits & nuts is that if I don't like the flavor, I can always just add sugar until I taste nothing but sugar. That probably makes me terrible, but hey, at least I'm a terrible person who is eating a clump of nutty brown sugar rather than a beernut. Because beernuts are gross.

    I'm really glad that sugar isn't sentient.

    So, on that note I again have to implore you to do as much research as you can stand. Many commercially available non-organic sugars (white AND brown) are clarified with bone char during the manufacturing phase. These bones can come from many animals, quite often the ones subjected to the mass "grow-em and slaughter-em" operations you seem to be opposed to. If the sugar is organic then it's not made with bone char, and some non-organic sugars are also sans-char, but it varies by manufacturer. Store brands can sometimes be difficult to verify due to their product coming from so many different vendors.

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    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    How exactly do you do tortillas? Unless you are making them yourself they are made with lard or other animal fats en masse.
    You can make tortillas with any fat. I use canola oil and/or shortening when I make them.

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    radroadkillradroadkill MDRegistered User regular
    I've been vegetarian since 2005!

    Just to chime in some things I didn't see mentioned: I try to avoid meat substitutes most of the time but if I'm feeling lazy or we have a crapton of people over grilling burgers or I'm just in the mood for it I stick to the Quorn brand. The texture is much better than most substitutes and it takes flavor on better.

    But mostly I just eat a lot of vegetables. I generally use a lot of mushrooms and eggplants in addition to legumes. I find them to be a hearty, textured, great center to a meal if I want that really chewy, meaty feel- even though they're nothing like meat.

    Another site that I found useful and really easy when I first started transitioning was Vegetarian Times. Sometimes they have great recipes, sometimes they can be a bit bland, but being young, learning to cook, and having no support from my family/being relatively new at all of this it was great to have as a learning tool and I still find a lot of good recipe inspiration for them. My all time, never fail, amazing cookbooks that I can't live without are from Moosewood. I've never made a disappointing recipe from them.

    On that note, I have to agree with everyone that's said to teach yourself to cook. It's amazing, and liberating. I think it's something everyone should do but I've found that it's made me more resourceful, it's pushed me past my comfort zone with food, it saves money, and it's amazing. When you're good at it you'll wow people who don't have dietary restrictions and generally people who sneer that vegetarian food sucks- I got that all the time before putting food in their mouths. (Note: I'm no genius in the kitchen or culinary expert but I'm ALWAYS the one with people inviting themselves over and hosting the dinner parties/gathering in our circle for some reason... 8-) )

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    Pure DinPure Din Boston-areaRegistered User regular
    I'm not a vegetarian but I really like vegetarian sausage, particularly Tofurkey Kilbasa and Field Roast Mexican Chipoltle. They're both super-spicy and flavorful, and I like them because they're less oily and fatty than regular sausage. I like to chop or crumble them up to add flavor to greens (like bok choy) or soup or pasta.

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    ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Bendit wrote: »
    Šh¡†! Güå¢åmøl€!

    Knock it off.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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    kedinikkedinik Captain of Industry Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Field Roast makes great vegan grain "meat". It's delicious diced up, cooked, spiced, and put into tacos or burritos.

    kedinik on
    I made a game! Hotline Maui. Requires mouse and keyboard.
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    ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Oh, also depending on where you are, you maaaaaay maaaaaaaaybe have a dairy nearby that doesn't raise for slaughter. It's worth a look, because cheese.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Sadly, although I love cheese, I've become lactose intolerant over the years. It makes me sick just to eat a chunk of aged white cheddar anymore (but it's sometimes worth it anyway :D ).

    With Love and Courage
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    ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    That is me and ice cream. I say "yeah, but that's future-me's problem" at least once a month.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Yeah. But then I'm like, "Oh God, past-me, what the fuck did you do!? Why are you such a dick???"

    *barf*

    With Love and Courage
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    Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    All meat substitutes suck. It's the whole fast, cheap, powerful argument you sometimes hear when buying something and how you can only get two of the three at any time. When it comes to meat substitutes it's texture, flavor, look. Only the best meat substitutes give you two of those; most give you one or zero!

    Dairy substitutes are just as bad or worse. Soy Milk and anything made from it makes me gag. Almond milk is ok. Frozen desserts made from Coconut Cream are fantastic...but not ice cream. Sorbet is also deliciously not ice cream.

    Sorbet leads me to another fantastic point about eating vegetarian. It's better to not try and look for substitutes for meat and dairy. It's better to get to love what you have. Fake eggs and other tofu products are disgusting. Tofu by itself, fried up properly or in a soup is DIVINE. Mushrooms and beans and other vegetable matter ground up and bound by unholy means and overseasoned makes terrible fake chicken patties or burgers, but take the same ingredients and some rice and there are twenty delicious salads and burritoes and other dishes you can make.

    It can suck. You gotta ignore those delicious smells. You usually have to ignore convenience or pay a premium for it. I could and would never go completely off meat, I love the stuff. I still cook vegetarian meals for dietary reasons at least four or five times a week. Probably half of those are vegan.

    There is one safe option out there for "fast-ish" food that I find absolutely 100% satisfying. Really good vegetarian sushi. My mom likes the idea of sushi but is too squeemish about fish to ever order it (she's had some bad run ins with cooked fish, let alone raw fish) so she eventually started ordering various vegetarian rolls from our local Japanese/Chinese fusion take out joint and man was it good and almost every time I visit her for a lunch date we get some of that along with whatever meat options there are available. Most of the rolls are avocado/cucumber based but some of them have some great centers like fried sweet potato or this lovely spicy carrot salad bit.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    I've never eaten (to my knowledge) tofu before, so i'll be giving it a try anyway.

    Also, apparently:
    ...The FDA granted this health claim for soy: "25 grams of soy protein a day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease."

    Sounds good. Hopefully I like the taste of it.

    With Love and Courage
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    kedinikkedinik Captain of Industry Registered User regular
    I drink soy milk in part because dairy triggers my asthma. Call me crazy, but it tastes fine.

    I made a game! Hotline Maui. Requires mouse and keyboard.
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    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    More random helpful stuff: the Something Awful vegan thread is great, and the Something Awful poor people food thread has a lot of great vegetarian tips.

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    Void SlayerVoid Slayer Very Suspicious Registered User regular
    I'll echo that you need to try a lot of different beans and preparation methods to find something good. It's a different taste and will not replace the tastes of meat but they can offer a wide range of different textures and flavors.

    As far as meat substitutes go, the best way to look into them is not as replacements for a specific kind of meat but like a new meat you never tried yet. I tried a lot of different ones the first time I tried a vegetarian diet and some of them you could have sworn they were meat, mostly "ground beef" type replacements, which is really the meat you should be replacing first anyway.

    If someone had told me it was ground raccoon or panda or snake I would have believed them if I had not cooked it myself. You are going to have to experiment on the fake meat route if you want to pursue it.

    The meat substitutes will still need to be part of a varied diet because they mostly either are not balanced in proteins and vitamins or use artificially added versions.

    As far as proteins if you combine a rich root like yams plus a couple types of beans and whole grain brown rice and wheat you should be covered, its easier then it looks if you just eat a variety, but look at those links made by others on specific nutrition when you are first starting.

    Vitamins and minerals are also quite important to make sure you are eating correctly.

    When you are out with people at a restaurant or at someones house just eat the one or two vegetarian options then eat correctly at home. You are not realistically going to be able to get a well balanced vegetarian meal on the go like that.

    He's a shy overambitious dog-catcher on the wrong side of the law. She's an orphaned psychic mercenary with the power to bend men's minds. They fight crime!
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    EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    How exactly do you do tortillas? Unless you are making them yourself they are made with lard or other animal fats en masse.
    You can make tortillas with any fat. I use canola oil and/or shortening when I make them.

    Yeah, it's easy to do if you make them, but making any quantity or quality takes a goodly amount of time. Store bought brands are always meat involved (I've not seen a vegan option even at Whole Foods, which is the best sort of place by me). If anyone in here knows of a good vegan brand I'd like to hear it. While I am not a vegetarian or vegan at all, I know folk who are and would like to have an option for them during taco nights.

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    SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    kedinik wrote: »
    I drink soy milk in part because dairy triggers my asthma. Call me crazy, but it tastes fine.

    I am more of an almond milk kind of guy, personally, but there are a variety of alternatives out there in any case.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    ceres wrote: »
    That is me and ice cream. I say "yeah, but that's future-me's problem" at least once a month.

    Same here with milkshakes. Mine's just a mild irritation and tons of gas. They make lactaid for that.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    Also since I was talking about salt on foods. You haven't had corn on the cob until you've had salt on your corn on the cob.

    Nutmeg. You meant nutmeg.

    What is this I don't even.
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    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    Enc wrote: »
    How exactly do you do tortillas? Unless you are making them yourself they are made with lard or other animal fats en masse.
    You can make tortillas with any fat. I use canola oil and/or shortening when I make them.

    Yeah, it's easy to do if you make them, but making any quantity or quality takes a goodly amount of time. Store bought brands are always meat involved (I've not seen a vegan option even at Whole Foods, which is the best sort of place by me). If anyone in here knows of a good vegan brand I'd like to hear it. While I am not a vegetarian or vegan at all, I know folk who are and would like to have an option for them during taco nights.
    If you only know a few vegetarians or vegans then you don't need to make a goodly amount, right? Unfortunately I don't have any recommendations for store bought tortillas because I've never tasted any store bought tortillas that are much better than cardboard, let alone anywhere near as good as homemade tortillas.

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    SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited February 2013
    Enc wrote: »
    Enc wrote: »
    How exactly do you do tortillas? Unless you are making them yourself they are made with lard or other animal fats en masse.
    You can make tortillas with any fat. I use canola oil and/or shortening when I make them.

    Yeah, it's easy to do if you make them, but making any quantity or quality takes a goodly amount of time. Store bought brands are always meat involved (I've not seen a vegan option even at Whole Foods, which is the best sort of place by me). If anyone in here knows of a good vegan brand I'd like to hear it. While I am not a vegetarian or vegan at all, I know folk who are and would like to have an option for them during taco nights.
    If you only know a few vegetarians or vegans then you don't need to make a goodly amount, right? Unfortunately I don't have any recommendations for store bought tortillas because I've never tasted any store bought tortillas that are much better than cardboard, let alone anywhere near as good as homemade tortillas.

    Especially when it comes to corn tortillas, this is not a phenomenon unique to vegetarian-specific products.

    SammyF on
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    Magic PinkMagic Pink Tur-Boner-Fed Registered User regular
    Jesus, why are people being so ridiculously hard on the meat substitutes? I love the stuff. It's the whole reason I went vegetrarian; I prefer it over meat. Seitan is my favorite but I get the Boca stuff all the time.

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    EncEnc A Fool with Compassion Pronouns: He, Him, HisRegistered User regular
    Well, so much for hoping. Good as homemade tortillas are, and as much as I love my pan and press when it's just the wife and I, it's just not economical for time to serve twenty people homemade in addition to everything else prepared.

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