Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Board Games] - Running all your nets and winging all your exes

jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
edited May 2013 in Critical Failures
Hey there! This thread is about board games. Let me tell you about them!
i-XvK9tQs-950x10000.jpg

Welcome, traveller! But perhaps you come to this thread as a regular attendee; in that case, I move aside to let you pass, give you a fraternal nod, and I gesture you towards your regular chair. For the rest of you, I continue:

Perhaps you have heard tales of “penile locomotives” (see above spoilered comic and associated post). Perhaps you have been referred here, and still grasp the scribbled directions to this odd corner of the PA district, itself an odd corner of the Coruscant-like internet metropolis. Perhaps a search has brought you here, dropping you off unceremoniously at our door like some rude chauffeur. Whatever the circumstances, I again say, welcome!

This thread exists to convey one simple message: board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk. Like, a really long way. Perhaps you like those well enough, but fear the time investment. Perhaps you’re looking for quick games to play during your lunch hour. Perhaps you’re looking for something for when friends want to hang out. Perhaps you’re looking for an all-day simulation of the asymmetrical struggles of Europe during the Protestant Reformation. No problem, gotcha covered. So without further ado, let me attempt to give you a barely-sketched outline of what is possible in cardboard, wood and plastic.


GREAT GAMES TO INTRODUCE TO JUST ABOUT ANYONE (including those new to games):

Ticket to Ride
pic115214_md.jpg
Quite possibly one of the best entry-level games. Draw cards into your hands, claim a route between two cities with your train cars by laying down same-color cards that match a route on the board. Simple, intuitive. Kids can grasp it, adults can play it more cut-throat and get into deeper strategies. Many versions have been made; they are pretty much all great, but check to see how many people can play. There’s also plenty of expansion maps, including a highly-rated Asia map for team play up to 6.

Dominion
pic392195_md.jpg
This genre-defining game is played entirely with cards. Hey, I thought we were talking about board games! We are, shut up, it’s a problem of semantics, whatever. Anyway, in this game you build up your own personal deck by accumulating money cards (to buy things), action cards (to make cool stuff happen), and victory point cards (which give you points but clog up your deck). Each game has different action cards to buy so every game is different. There are a TON of expansions; good ones are Seaside (adds effects which carry over into later turns), Intrigue (a lot more interaction between players), and Prosperity (adds higher-value money and victory point cards). It plays fast, but some of the expansions slow it down a bit. Don’t buy Village.

Carcassonne
pic669244_md.jpg
Another older game, which has aged well because of its short length and wide appeal. Pick up a tile, add it to the tiles already placed so that you match the road, castle, or field. You may optionally “claim” a road, castle, or field with one of your followers or “meeples”, which gives you points. A great, quick game for pretty much all ages, but it is especially good for a younger crowd.

Small World
Wil Wheaton! In this very spoiler! But if you let him out you'll have to say his name three times to put him back.
Choose from the randomized races, spread out, hold key areas, gain points every round. Once you have extended as much as you can, put the race into decline (i.e. you can’t do anything with it but it still gives you points), and choose a new race. You get the good feeling from wiping someone out without as much of the hurt feelings, because they can just get a new race and ethnic-cleanse you in return. Popular, has a bunch of expansions.

Lords of Waterdeep
Newer game, but it has really made a splash. It’s a fairly light worker-placement euro that non-gamers (or minimal-gamers) really seem to enjoy. The “worker-placement” part is themed up as sending knights and wizards off to accomplish quests, and there’s even a bit of back-stabbery against the other players.


REALLY GOOD TWO-PLAYER GAMES:

Twilight Struggle
pic1229405_md.jpg
Probably the best epic 2-player game. Epic because of its length and scope. Intensely confrontational without being a wargame. Imagine a game about the Cold War where the mechanics take, at face value, the rhetoric of both sides. In other words, it’s the USA versus the USSR, and all the other nations in the world are just pawns to be influenced one way or the other. Influence is what you “spend” every round, to control a nation or even cause an uprising in a less-stable nation. Influence tends to spread through a region like a virus. You can use an event card for the event (which is some historical event or concept), or use it for influence, or even put it towards the space race. The only possible downside is that it’s long for a 2-player game, so it may be hard to introduce to a casual gaming group.

Memoir '44
pic562743_md.jpg
This is simply the easiest introduction into a whole family of light wargames: Commands & Colors: Ancients, Commands & Colors: Napoleonics, BattleLore, BattleCry. Most can be played within an hour, but can feel suitable epic. The basic idea is that the battlefield is divided into a left, center, and right flank. You play a card that “orders” units in a flank (or flanks), which allows it to move and attack. You attack by rolling dice, which can cause hits or retreats. You win by wiping out a set number of units (and maybe occupying critical points). A brilliant system that each game has a special “spin” on. Memoir is a bit simpler and has a very appealing theme. Ancients is also highly regarded here (and is my favorite); it has a priority on melee attacks and gives additional benefits if your units are lined up.

Summoner Wars
pic1290288_md.jpg
Think of this as some strange asymmetric chess variant where the pieces are cards. Each player chooses a faction, and your goal is to kill the enemy summoner. Your units are ranged or melee, and have different attack strengths, and different hit points. You attack with dice. You bring new units out of your hand onto the board if you can pay the cost in magic. You gain magic by killing units or by dumping cards from your hand. Each faction plays VERY differently, and in fact every single card has some special ability (like moving extra spaces or attacking in a different way). There are a TON of factions for this game -- I think 16 right now -- and expansions for limited deck construction, and even some alternate summoners, so there’s a lot of stuff to try out.

Battle Line
pic1170_md.jpg
This SOUNDS like another combat game, but it’s not. It’s an abstract game where you’ve got 9 flags in a row, and you take turns playing one card in front of a flag. You need a better “set” of three cards in front of a flag to “claim” that flag as yours. Get 5 total flags or 3 adjacent flags to win. It’s a game where you’re working through the odds of finishing a “set”, against a bit of guessing as to what your opponent is holding onto in his hand.

Hive
pic155724_md.jpg
This is an abstract game where the entire game is 22 hexagon pieces of bakelite. There’s not even a board. The pieces are bugs, each of which moves in a particular way. The winner is the one that surrounds the enemy queen. It looks pretty nice as the game plays itself out, too.

BattleCON (War of Indines)
pic1299828_md.jpg
Round 1! Fight! Yes, another "fighting game simulation" where you have a movement track and play attacks simultaneously, and try to out-think/out-maneuver your opponent. Your "hand" is made up of a few "styles" (unique to your character) and "bases" (mostly the same for everyone), and an attack combines one style and one base. Any attack you do is on "cooldown" and can’t be used for 2 beats. The game comes with 18 characters, and they are all QUITE different to play. This one will inevitably get compared to Yomi (and Flash Duel), but I think that this is somewhat easier and/or more fun to learn. The print-and-play comes with 4 characters and is pretty easy to put together, if you want to try it out.

Android: Netrunner
pic1415148_md.jpg
Newer asymmetric game that is very geeky and very good. The "corporation" player must defend and score their agendas. The "hacker" player must steal agendas from the "corporation". The agendas are worth points, and first to 7 points wins. What really sets this one apart is that almost everything the corporation does is hidden information (i.e. face-down cards), so there's ample room for bluffing and traps. This is a "Living Card Game", which means that there are numerous expansions, each of which is a fixed number of cards so you know what you're buying. Still allows for spending a lot on the game, but the base game comes with a LOT of stuff to try out (i.e. multiple hacker and corporation "identities").


BIG-GROUP FUN (6+ players):

Bohnanza
Great little game of planting, trading, and harvesting beans. The trick is that you can’t rearrange your hand; you must trade in order to plant the beans you want. Once you get enough of a particular type of bean (or when you’re forced to plant another type of bean), harvest it for points. It get special kudos from me because it’s great with kids and adults. Plays up to 7.

Dixit (Odyssey)
pic535127_md.jpg
A party game! Well, sort of. In this game everybody is given a hand of imaginative, surreal, and evocative cards. The active player puts a card face down, and give a phrase, word, or noise that goes with it. Everyone else ALSO puts in a card that best goes with that “clue”. They are mixed up, shown, and people get points for picking the active player’s card, or for getting people to choose their card. But if the clue is too obvious or too hard, the active player gets NO points. So there are serious demands made on the imagination of the players -- dull clues or simply half-hearted ones diminish the game experience. But knowing that caveat, it’s a GREAT game. There are a couple of versions of this one, but Odyssey plays up to 12.

Time’s Up! (Title Recall)
pic352378_md.jpg
Another party game, but you might call this one a “proper” party game. You play in pairs, and you have 30 seconds at a time to make your partner guess what’s on the cards. In the first round, you can use just about any clues, gestures, and noises. In the second round, you are limited to ONE WORD for a clue and one guess. In the third round, NO talking but gestures and noises still allowed. Absolute hilarity ensues. The "Title Recall" version is the best, because even if you don't know the movie/book/song, you can give hints one word at a time (i.e. "Devil With the Blue Dress On" is easier than "Rutherford B. Hayes" if you are unfamiliar with both).

Citadels
pic830867_md.jpg
Straight-forward, almost bare-bones social game that is also great and plays up to 8. Pass around the role cards, pick one secretly, the king calls out the roles in order. A good way to introduce the “social” type of board games.

7 Wonders
pic838081_md.jpg
30-minute game that is VERY popular game these-a-days for a group of up to 7. You build up a civilization, which really just means you play cards that produce some product, or provide military strength, or give you points directly, or improves your science. So multiple win paths, which is always cool. Each player has a hand, but you only play ONE card before passing your hand to the adjacent player. You can also trade with your neighbors, so overall you are VERY interested in what other players are doing, and you often have to change your strategy to thwart theirs. Highly recommended by this thread.

The Resistance
pic819729_md.jpg
You ever play mafia or werewolf? Some smart guy boiled it down into a 5-10 player game that can be played in 30 minutes. Every round someone becomes the leader, who then chooses a team for a mission. Each person on the team secretly contribute a “pass” or “fail” card for that mission. Since there are spies, some missions are going to fail. Incriminations will fall like the rain on the moor. Best 3 out of 5 missions. An elegant and tense social game, but like all social games it is somewhat dependent on the group. Quick enough for multiple games (which will often be stridently demanded). There's also a newer, advanced version of this game called "Resistance: Avalon", where one character (Merlin) knows who the bad guys are, but the bad guys will win if they identify Merlin.


LONGER GAMES (3+ hours):

Twilight Imperium (3rd edition)
pic70195_md.jpg
Ah, the game that defines epic space expansion and warfare. In a nutshell, the hex-based “board” is made up of planetary systems, which can be conquered. You “spend” command tokens to activate a system and move stuff there or build stuff. Then there’s technology research, trading, dice-based warfare, secret objectives, phase selection, a hand of action cards,... and on and on. Pretty intense. Pretty long. But there’s something about the theme that makes it almost irresistible.

Eclipse
pic1570042_md.jpg
This game LOOKS similar to Twilight Imperium. Sci-fi space exploration with hexes, dice combat, and tech research. However, it is QUITE different in scope and "feel". This is a premier mechanic-centered euro in the same class as Power Grid and Agricola. This means that it’s a bit more indirect than you might expect in the genre; it has been described as “intensely passive-aggressive”. Many of your thoughts are about optimizing your actions or making other people’s actions sub-optimal, rather than "space ship battle pew pew". However, direct conflict has a definite place in this game, and furthermore it has awesome stuff like exploration-produced initial maps, and also customizing your own spacecraft blueprints.

Arkham Horror
pic85176_md.jpg
In many ways this is on the other end of the spectrum from the sterile spaceships and abstracted planet-conquering of Twilight Imperium or Eclipse. This game is all about the atmosphere, and trying to hold it together while you avoid being devoured by nameless horrors. Those horrors are of the Lovecraftian kind, and the rulebook kind. Seriously, the FAQ has its own FAQ. But if you can pierce through the “rule crust” into the pulsing black heart of the game, you’ll probably... uh... go insane. But madmen are often happy, right?

Risk: Legacy
pic1070260_md.jpg
This has consistently been one of the most-talked-about games since it came out. It’s a streamlined version of Risk with a huge twist -- after each game you will permanently alter the board (naming a continent, adding a city), the cards (ripping up(!) one of them), and/or the rule book itself. It comes with packets that you will open after meeting certain criteria. It’s meant to be played over 15 games with the same group of people, producing a totally unique map which is also a testament to each previous battle. Not all groups can make this kind of commitment, but we can dream, can’t we?

Dominant Species
A grand worker-placement and area-control game, that still very successfully conveys the theme of struggling for survival on a map that’s far too small and environmentally hostile.

War of the Ring
The definitive LOTR experience in board game form. It’s everybody against the Sauron player, and you have to keep the One Ring out of his hands while also keeping his armies from turning Middle-Earth into a suburb of Mordor.


And here are some common board game categories, and some representative games for each:

DECK-BUILDING:
Dominion -- (mentioned above)

Thunderstone (Advance)
pic1235516_md.jpg
This was the next big game after Dominion that used the same mechanic, but it has a real theme! It’s a dungeon crawl. Wait, what? No, seriously! The basic idea is that you alternate between buying adventurers and weapons and stuff in the village to improve your deck, and then trying to defeat monsters in the dungeon, which also get added to your deck, giving you points and other benefits. Has a ton of expansions. There’s a new version of this called “Thunderstone Advance” that is probably your best choice if you’re starting off.

Quarriors
pic1022441_md.jpg
Dice. Lots of dice. Cool dice. You roll dice and buy things with... ugh... “quiddity” shown on them. You buy monsters that attack other players’ monsters. Doesn’t have a lot of depth, especially when compared to other games with this mechanic (I would lean towards calling it filler), but it’s flashy and quick and good for getting an “Oh, cool!” out of people you introduce it to. There are some "advanced rules" if you want to mix up and/or deepen the gameplay, though it makes the game a bit longer.

Ascension

ROLE SELECTION
Puerto Rico
pic125017_md.jpg
The premier euro game. Shoot, the premier board game. Rich, deep, and meaty. Grow crops, sell them, buy buildings which give you abilities and benefits, and you need laborers for all this stuff as well. You choose a role which helps you in some way every round. High player interaction, though it's not direct. For such a deep game, it’s not actually that difficult to teach to new players, but there can be a big gulf in player skill. Some people who have played this forever can be a bit hostile to newbies, but that is NOT true of the people in this thread, that I've seen. Playable online -- many people here will help you get started if you ask.

Race for the Galaxy
pic265206_md.jpg
Card-based space-exploration/conquest economic game, though the theme isn’t very strong. Players choose a phase simultaneously, and the only phases in the round are the ones that players picked. Has a pretty dense iconography, making it a bit daunting for new players, but it allows for a fleshed-out and satisfying game with multiple paths to victory. Low player interaction. Has a bunch of expansions; I suggest the first one (Gathering Storm), as it improves the base game and adds some optional goals to provide a focus for new players. Good with two players, also.

Citadels
-- see above

ROUTE BUILDING/CLAIMING:

Ticket to Ride (mentioned above)

Power Grid
pic780256_md.jpg
A meaty, polished, economic game. Buy a network of cities, bid on power plants to power those cities, profit. You need to supply your power plants with resources (oil, nuclear, etc), but the cost of a resource goes up if everybody needs it. There’s math. LOTS of math. There’s also a bit of fiddling as you decide the turn order (and whether you’re going through it forwards or backwards), refilling resources, knowing when to go to “Step 2/3”, and so on. So not really an introductory-level game, but very satisfying.

Steam
This is the latest incarnation of a very good series of route-building goods-delivery games. This one is great because it has a totally viable "basic" version of the rules, streamlined and appropriate for casual groups, and a "standard" version of the rules, with auctions for everything and a much more demanding economic system. It's almost two games in one. Whenever I play Ticket to Ride (except for the Asia team game), I fantasize about playing this one instead.

HIDDEN TRAITOR:

Battlestar Galactica
pic361693_md.jpg
In the description for The Resistance, I called it “tense”. Battestar Galactica redefines the term into something devastating. It’s a game with a strong theme from the TV series, but the game is good enough to be fully enjoyed by people who have who have never seen the show. The goal is to get to Earth, but the ship is faced with environmental threats in deep space, hostile Cylon warships, and internal Cylon traitors. Each player has a hand of cards that is used to meet (or sabotage) these threats. The basic flow is “Jump into terrible location, deal with terrible event after terrible event, deal with an increasingly terrible Cylon armada, and then jump again... if anybody is still alive”. Popular here on the forums as PbP.

ABSTRACT:
Ingenious
pic40424_md.jpg
Great, intuitive abstract that scales well from 2-4. Place a tile on the hexagonal board to score points for matching icons. You need to score well in EVERY icon type, because only your WORST icon score is your actual score. Get it? Part of the appeal of this game is the excellent component quality. Chunky plastic tiles, fabric bag, and solid cardboard.

Blokus
pic61429_md.jpg
A more confrontational abstract, where you simply need to get as many of your pieces on the board as possible. Anything not placed counts against you. Blocking others is inevitable but still tricky. Simple enough for young players. A possible downside is that it is really best with 4 players. For a slightly more flexible (in terms of players) and forgiving variant, try Blokus Trigon. But my wife swears by the original.

Through the Desert
Another Knizia classic. You place colored camels one at a time, getting points by getting to an oasis or cordoning off a section of the board. It's vaguely reminiscent of Go, actually.

Hive -- (mentioned above)

When I was a child, I had a fever...
jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
My BoardGameGeek profile
Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
Duelyst: TheGerm
(send PM if you send invite)
jergarmar on
Gethtzeentchling
«134567108

Posts

  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    WORKER PLACEMENT:
    Lords of Waterdeep (mentioned above)

    Kingsburg
    pic262999_md.jpg
    A pretty and fairly light dice-driven euro. Roll dice, place dice, manipulate dice. Build buildings and reap the rewards. Fairly high amounts of interaction. You’re fighting over resources, but at the end of every round you fight off a growing Horde. Each phase has lots of interesting choices. Has some catch-up mechanics too, making it fairly easy to introduce to new players.

    Agricola
    pic259546_md.jpg
    Farming-themed game of resource management. Sound exciting? It is! You struggle just to get your family fed, and yet you also need to scrabble for resources to improve your farm. One of the most satisfying things is upgrading your wood hut to stone. Fairly easy to teach to others, simply because the theme is so immediately understandable, and the turns are quick, and because at the end of the game, even if you lose, you can admire and show off the farm you made. So I would call it a good introduction to the longer euro games.

    NEGOTIATION:
    Cosmic Encounter
    pic405850_md.jpg
    A strange entry into this genre, but this is a difficult-to-classify and yet really good group game that I must mention. In this game each player has 5 planets and 20 ships, and to win they need to get at least one ship (a "colony") on 5 foreign worlds. Each player also gets an alien power, and some of them are absurdly powerful and unfair. But that just means that they will find everyone teaming up against them. You don't choose who to attack (the destiny deck decides that), but you CAN choose who to ally with. So it takes the fangs out of the confrontation, and fewer people get their feelings hurt. It's very much a social game that can be played as friendly or as back-stabby as the group wishes. It's not TOO serious or strategic, so it might not be the best for your hardcore wargame group, but it is a lighter game that has aged amazingly well.

    Game of Thrones
    pic60127_md.jpg
    I LOVE that I'm putting this game after Cosmic Encounter. They could not be more different in tone. CE is ponies and rainbows, and this one is flint knives and broken glass. In other games there is a back-stab mechanic -- in this game it is the driving force of the game. This is because you have your territory to defend, but you simply can’t defend against all threats. You place order tokens face down into different regions on the board, allowing for a surprise on the reveal phase. And even after you reveal, you have opportunities for deception (for example, promising to help defend but then you join the attack). Here’s a bible verse: “Behold, you are trusting in Egypt, that broken reed of a staff, which will pierce the hand of any man who leans on it.” Except that EVERYBODY is Egypt, including you. As soon as you reeeeally need someone to support you (or vice versa), that's when they will invade your unprotected flank, undoing what it took you half the game to build up. There seems to be some common sentiments that this is the kind of game where you can’t WAIT to play again... and also where you FEAR playing it again.

    TRADING:
    Settlers of Catan
    pic1253129_md.jpg
    Ah, the grandfather of what’s called the “euro-game”. Little direct confrontation, trading, grabbing valuable resources or positions before your opponent, a bit abstract, and you win by accumulating the most points. You accumulate and trade to get certain combinations of resources to get cities and roads. Your cities help you gather more resources. It’s a bit grey around the temples these days, and there are probably better expressions of these mechanics, but it has stood the test of time and one huge reason to include it here is that you may have already played it. If you want an expansion, get “Seafarers”.

    Bohnanza
    -- see above

    COOPERATIVE:
    Pandemic
    pic347643_md.jpg
    This is the most “mainline” of a group of games with similar mechanics. The others are Forbidden Island (search for treasure theme, a bit easier) and Defenders of the Realm (fantasy theme, a bit more involved). You play cooperatively against the game, needed to coordinate and combine your special abilities in order not to die horribly. In Pandemic the theme is fighting disease outbreaks all over the world.

    Space Alert
    pic384545_md.jpg
    One criticism of standard co-op games is that a knowledgeable player can power-game and boss the other players around. Space Alert seeks to solve this problem by making “that guy” the captain (responsible for any and all failures), and by adding a time restraint. You actually play a track off of a CD, which will give you a certain amount of time to meet each threat. You play cards to “go to this room, press this button” to deal with the threat. After the mission track is over, you go through everyone’s cards and determine whether you succeeded, or (much more likely) you determine which threat caused everyone to die a gruesome death. Super cool but also a much more intense and stressful games than some people enjoy. But those people don’t deserve to be your friends, now, do they?

    AREA CONTROL:
    El Grande
    pic105292_md.jpg
    An older euro game, but the daddy of all area control games, and still very highly regarded. You play "caballeros" into regions adjacent to the movable “king” figure, and then you score points in a region by having more of them than the others. There are semi-randomized event cards which drive the action every round, so every game and every round is different. A bit abstract but still pretty approachable.

    Chaos in the Old World
    pic1114626_md.jpg
    Area control meets Warhammer fantasy chaos gods. Not exactly child-safe content (“Rain of Pus”, et al), but a strong theme meeting a solid euro mechanic. Encourages some deliciously evil role-playing and temporary alliances. The characters play out VERY differently in how they score points and manage their hand -- kudos for the (mostly) balanced asymmetrical play. Popular here as PbP.

    Age of Empires III: Age of Discovery
    pic217575_md.jpg
    A bit of genre-crossing while colonizing the new world. You place colonists to establish control of an area, but you’re also putting down buildings to get benefits and points, and doing some worker-placement to make stuff happen. “Stuff” can be over-generalized as discovery, trading, and colonizing, each of which is a valid path to victory. A nice way to scratch that civilization-building itch in just a couple of hours.

    RACING:
    RoboRally
    pic206601_md.jpg
    Programmable robots! You choose 5 instruction cards out of your hand to move your robot on a board filled with hazards. Cards are revealed simultaneously, keeping the action moving along. You need to land on flags in order, which are scattered across the board. If you bump another robot, that robot continues its instructions for that round, potentially driving it into a pit or missing the flag. Hugely customizable -- it’s almost a game system in its own right, allowing and encouraging variants like “blocker” robots and team-based capture-the-flag.

    Galaxy Trucker
    Racing game? Well, yeah, but the most fun is the time-limited and frenzied ship-building phase. Or maybe the most fun is watching your friend’s ship get sawn in half by an errant meteor. Anyway, you get points for bringing home cargo ahead of your competitors, but there’s a good chance that nobody even makes it to the finish line. And nobody seems to mind!

    Formula D
    pic1001993_md.jpg
    An attractive Formula 1 racing game. There are some flaws here, such as a runaway-leader problem and player elimination, but it plays quickly so it doesn’t matter TOO much. You want to get into the higher gears to move faster, but it has a contrary push-your-luck mechanic in that you have to stop X number of times in a corner. It also has drafting, customizable car stats, and fiery crashes. It plays a LOT of people, too -- up to 10.

    DEXTERITY:
    Crokinole
    pic79413_md.jpg
    Dexterity games are not mentioned much here, but they are still worth a look. Crokinole is a classic where the gameplay revolves around flicking disks into certain areas of a circular board. It’s also about letting your teammates down, after being set up for the perfect shot. This is an expensive game, but it can also be a beautiful conversation-starting display game.

    Sorry! Sliders
    pic618788_md.jpg
    This is a cheap, readily available dexterity game that kids seem to love. You slide pieces down a track to score points on a concentric-ring target. The track can be made longer for a more “adult” difficulty.

    Pitchcar
    pic1102217_md.jpg
    A modern dexterity classic where you race around a track by flicking your car. There’s also a version of Sorry! Sliders (Cars 2?) with this mechanic that might be easier to find.

    Catacombs
    pic629173_md.jpg
    A newer dexterity game with a dungeon-crawl twist. You flick your heroes (or monsters) against the enemy to score “hits”. Some characters are ranged and have little discs to fire, also.

    TACTICAL MINIATURES:
    X-Wing Miniatures Game
    This is probably one of the biggest wallet-smacking games in this thread, but it’s irresistible. It’s a fairly quick and easy system to send a handful of TIE fighters against a couple of X-Wings and see what happens. Oh, but there’s also Y-Wings. And TIE Interceptors. And A-Wings. And the Millenium Falcon and Slave 1. And they all look pretty great. You can also choose pilots like Luke and Vader and Biggs, and add mech droids like good ol’ R2-D2. But for a proper game you’ll probably want 2 core sets, 1 X-Wing and 1 TIE (for the extra pilots), a couple of Interceptors, a couple more rebel ships to taste.... yeah. But it’s Star Wars! So queue up the John Williams on your MP3 player and get started.

    Super Dungeon Explore
    pic952031_md.jpg
    Some games here remind one of a video game (i.e. space exploration --> Masters of Orion); this game tries to evoke something like Gauntlet in a more direct way. Anime-style characters, monster spawning portals, light hack-n-slash gameplay, and really really impressive miniatures. But there's the rub -- you have to put the darn things together, and it is NOT trivial. But once you're done, you'll have something that turns heads when you bring it out.

    Descent 2.0
    Looking for an old-fashioned fantasy RPG with an epic campaign, packaged into bite-sized scenarios? You might try this one. This new version has really boiled it down to it’s best parts, and there’s already expansions in the works, so there’s no better time to jump into it.

    D&D games
    This is not a single game, but a whole family of light dungeon-crawl skirmish games (Wrath of Ashardalon, Legend of Drizzt, Castle Ravenloft), which are all compatible with each other and have some pretty cool looking monsters.

    LIGHT/SHORT/FILLER:
    7 Wonders (mentioned above)

    King of Tokyo
    A little game by Richard Garfield (i.e. creator of Magic) that is way more fun than it has any right to be. Each player is a giant monster, and you can attack each other by rolling a bunch of dice, but the big points are gained when you go into Tokyo and stay there for as long as you can. While you're there you can be attacked by everybody, so there's a push-your-luck element to it.

    Hey, That's My Fish!
    Fun game of sliding penguins and claiming fish and blocking opponents, that's ALSO cutthroat enough for adults to play.

    Love Letter

    Roll Through the Ages
    A surprisingly satisfying little civ-building dice-rolling game.

    No Thanks
    pic225997_md.jpg
    Simple, light bidding (or perhaps anti-bidding) game that everybody enjoys. Each player is given chips, which give them the ability to "pass" and avoid taking a card. The chips build up on the card until somebody takes it. Plays in 20 minutes, tops.

    For Sale
    pic712836_md.jpg
    Simple auction game that everybody likes. In the first phase you bid on properties ranging from cardboard box to space station. In the second phase you blind bid properties to get checks. Count up the checks at the end and the person with the most money wins.

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
    jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    My BoardGameGeek profile
    Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
    Duelyst: TheGerm
    (send PM if you send invite)
    tzeentchling
  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited June 2013
    AND INTRODUCING SOME REGULARS TO THE THREAD :

    JonBob
    JonBob

    Short, filler games
    No Thanks! - This game is basically perfect. A very small set of rules leads to very interesting emergent behavior.
    For Sale - What No Thanks! does for push-your-luck games, For Sale does for auctions. Simple, quick, easy to teach.
    King of Tokyo - Roar! Monsters! Everyone can get into the theme here, and it's hard to take it too seriously. Power Up! is a great expansion, but it does make the game longer.

    Light, Gateway games
    Ticket to Ride is a classic for good reason. The base game is greatly improved by 1910, and Team Asia is also fantastic.
    Pandemic remains my favorite co-op, especially revitalized with On the Brink.
    San Juan... I honestly prefer it to papa Puerto Rico or twin brother Race for the Galaxy in most ways. I'm in the minority.

    Light, but not really gateway, games
    Dominion is still probably the best basic deckbuilding game mechanically, if it is thematically dry. Try Prosperity first if you want to expand it.
    7 Wonders is short, but can be fairly deep. You won't understand what decisions are good ones the first time, which is why I don't put it in "gateway." The second time and thereafter, it's a blast. Best with Leaders.
    Kingdom Builder is dry, but the variable setup lends a lot of variety. It's basically an abstract, and I think refines ideas from classics like Through the Desert very well.

    An oddball suggestion
    Zendo is my favorite board game, bar none. I barely ever get to play it.

    Trynant
    Favorite Games:
    Earth Reborn - Best tactical minis game out there. Crazy deep almost to the point of simulation, but slowly eases you into it. Cannot recommend enough.
    Archipelago - Maybe not for everyone, but this game takes a good worker placement game and adds a heavy dose of theme and player interaction. Clever, amazing game.
    Space Alert - The best coop game. Play space cadets trying to deal with alien attacks, but in REAL TIME (tm). Great stuff.
    Dominant Species - Best game closest to a traditional worker-placement game I've played; although it's more like an abstract war game in many ways!
    Splotter games (Great Zimbabwe, Roads and Boats, Indonesia, Antiquity, Greed Inc.) - if you can get your hands on one (or more) of these, do so. Best kinds of straight euros out there.

    Worst Games:
    Fluxx
    Munchkin
    Titan
    HORUS HERESY - what an awful game

    Namrok
    My favorite games lately are Commands & Colors: Ancients and Napoleonics. Their fluid, quick gameplay really captures the feel of the battles for me, but stays relatively rules light. After that there is Chaos in the Old World, one of my favorite blends of European and American styles, and an exemplary case of asymmetric gameplay. I've also been completely enamored by X-Wing lately. The pilot skill system creates this fantastic sliding scale of partial knowledge as you take your turn. Plus individual actions resolve incredibly fast for a miniatures game. On the lighter side I've finally discovered Roll Through the Ages, and adore it. It's amazing how well this game captures civilization building in a 20 minute dice game that doesn't just feel like Yahtzee or shameless push your luck.

    ArcticLancer
    Core Worlds is still probably my favourite game. Even without Galactic Orders, it doesn't play out the same twice. Even when you don't win, you still have fun along the way. It's not an overly complex game, and it tends to work pretty well at damn near any player count. Overall, Core Worlds is full of genuinely meaningful decisions. Since drafting and actions happen interchangably, you have to make some tough choices, and it combines a strong tactical element (What is my priority right now? Is someone else going to take the card/world I want before I take another turn?) with a strong strategic element as you aim to take your final worlds.
    Everything syncs up remarkably well, and is supported with nicely flowing gameplay and gorgeous artwork.

    Inquisitor
    Favorite games:

    A Few Acres of Snow, Chaos in the Old World (sans expansion), GOSU, Citadels, Puerto Rico, Ghost Stories (favorite co-op), Twilight Struggle. Ascension (strictly as a portable, play by post, iOS experience).

    Games I dislike that other people like:

    Arkham Horror, Space Alert, Galaxy Trucker, Dominion

    jakobagger
    All-time favourites:
    A Game of Thrones: the Board Game
    Battlestar Galactica
    Blood Bowl
    Chaos in the Old World
    Civilization (2010)
    Dominion
    Dune
    Magic: the Gathering
    Puerto Rico
    Through the Ages
    Twilight Struggle

    Currently playing (apart from favourites):
    7 Wonders
    A Few Acres of Snow
    Blood Bowl Team Manager
    Citadels
    Horus Heresy
    Infiltration
    Innovation
    Lords of Waterdeep

    Want to get into/play more:
    Andean Abyss
    Android: Netrunner
    Republic of Rome

    Games I was less into:
    Ideology: the War of Ideas
    Junta
    Monopoly
    Outpost
    Power Grid: Factory Manager
    Zombies!!!

    I like: strong theme combined with tight/elegant mechanics, asymmetry/variable player powers, moving dudes around on a map, some amount of luck to ensure variation and re-playability (Cards over dice), breaking up turns to remove or minimize downtime.

    Dislike: overly dry or pasted-on theme, abstracts, games with perfect information and no luck (games that feel solvable I guess?), games with too much randomness or unpredictability, games that are longer than their depth can justify.

    Vyolynce
    I write about board games. A lot. Like, every other week for the last five years and counting. And I play more than that, thanks to a great weekly group at my FLGS that has been meeting for over six years now.

    As a Magic Judge, I'm predisposed to liking card-based games and have a definite bias against randomness (read: dice) affecting strategy*. As such, some of my favorite games are Race for the Galaxy, Sentinels of the Multiverse, and Ascension. You can see my full Top 10 (and collection) on BGG. I'm also a big fan of abstracts, but those don't usually get talked about as much since they're typically dry two-player affairs. Sadly, I don't get to play as many "epic" games as I would like due to my Board Game Night happening in the middle of the work week.

    *Games where dice drive strategy (Castles of Burgundy, Alien Frontiers) are usually ok.

    Good places to play games online:

    Boite a Jeux
    -- Agricola
    -- Alhambra
    -- Castles of Burgundy
    -- Dixit
    -- Trajan

    OCTGN
    -- THE place to play Android: Netrunner

    Yucata
    -- A Few Acres of Snow
    -- Roll Through the Ages
    -- El Grande
    -- Fearsome Floors
    -- Hawaii
    -- Stone Age

    Board Game Arena
    -- Race for the Galaxy
    -- Seasons
    -- Puerto Rico
    -- Libertalia
    -- Troyes
    -- Caylus

    BrettspielWelt
    -- ton of games but daunting


    Good places to find out more about games:

    BoardGameGeek
    The definitive site for all things board game. Forums, reviews, pictures, marketplace, you name it. Also complex and daunting at first. If you want to start using it, just start with looking up games you're interested in.

    The Dice Tower (also has The Dice Tower podcast)
    Very good podcast that is also an umbrella for a bunch of gaming podcasts and reviewers. Tom Vasel himself is a pretty good reviewer, but not so interested in the heavier euro games, especially those with threadbare themes.

    Shut Up and Sit Down
    Paul and Quinns are very funny reviewers of board games. The videos are great, but I think their blog reviews can be even better.

    Critical Failures PbP Gaming Index
    A repository of PbP games. Quite an assortment. Especially successful are Battlestar Galactica and Chaos in the Old World.

    Kickstarter Tabletop Games
    NEVER GO HERE. You'll end up paying some ridiculous amount for a miniatures game that won't ship for like 6 months because of the meticulously crafted minis and numerous stretch goals that they add-- hey! Didn't I just tell you not to go there?


    And finally, here are some previous incarnations of this thread (newest to oldest):
    -- Saving the world...
    -- Wil Wheaton's cardboard nerd-cred...
    --
    Risk Legacy is Neat...
    -- Space Alert Owns...
    -- Citadels For > 5 People...


    NOTES
    -- I made an executive decision and KICKED SETTLERS OF CATAN OFF THE LIST! But it's not like anybody here ever mentions it anyway.
    -- if you post with any regularity, send me a message with OP BLURB at the top and I'll include it!
    -- still need to add pictures
    -- still need description for Ascension
    -- a few new categories; if anything looks stupid let me know

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
    jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    My BoardGameGeek profile
    Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
    Duelyst: TheGerm
    (send PM if you send invite)
    Geth
  • blahmcblahblahmcblah I never drink... wine. Registered User regular
    Ah, new thread smell at last. Great OP.

  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    blahmcblah wrote: »
    Ah, new thread smell at last. Great OP.

    Hey! No peeking! My thread isn't even dressed yet!

    EDIT: And where's your OP blurb?

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
    jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    My BoardGameGeek profile
    Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
    Duelyst: TheGerm
    (send PM if you send invite)
  • cpugeek13cpugeek13 Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Yeah, very nice OP. If there was one thing I would add, it would be Love Letter to filler. For us, thats pretty much the ultimate filler game (small, light, fast). It also makes a damn good drinking game.

    Edit: Also, I just posted a thread on BGG. You guys are welcome to make suggestions if you'd like if you'd like.

    cpugeek13 on
  • ArcticLancerArcticLancer Best served chilled. Registered User regular
    If I can remember, I still want to send you more 'blurb'. We'll work on that.

  • LeumasWhiteLeumasWhite New ZealandRegistered User regular
    From the old thread:
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I have bought Archipelago but have to pick it up this weekend, and hopefully play it the weekend after. I am very interested in seeing people's reactions to it, whether they think it's racist (I don't, obviously), or interestingly political, or just a game with meeples.

    I've finally managed to get to play it (two games in two days with separate groups), and the reaction in both cases has been "just a game with meeples." The Slavery card came up both times, and nobody seemed to care. I guess we could all be horrible racists or something, though.

    But either way, the reaction to the actual game has been... vaguely positive? "Would probably play again" seems to be the common sentiment. I personally was left feeling not much at all. It was a game that I played, that filled some time, but it's not something I'm super-eager to get back to again. Which is actually good, since I thought it was a bit shit after a short 15-min test game.

    QPPHj1J.jpg
  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    woopwoop party in the new thread wooo!

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
    ArcticLancerblahmcblah
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    From the old thread:
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I have bought Archipelago but have to pick it up this weekend, and hopefully play it the weekend after. I am very interested in seeing people's reactions to it, whether they think it's racist (I don't, obviously), or interestingly political, or just a game with meeples.

    I've finally managed to get to play it (two games in two days with separate groups), and the reaction in both cases has been "just a game with meeples." The Slavery card came up both times, and nobody seemed to care. I guess we could all be horrible racists or something, though.

    But either way, the reaction to the actual game has been... vaguely positive? "Would probably play again" seems to be the common sentiment. I personally was left feeling not much at all. It was a game that I played, that filled some time, but it's not something I'm super-eager to get back to again. Which is actually good, since I thought it was a bit shit after a short 15-min test game.

    Did you play very co-operatively or what? And what kind of things does your group like? I am anticipating strong tensions in my group. We keep losing our games of Marvel Legendary because people try brinksmanship too much.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    I have to quit wandering back to the Guardian's Chronicles kickstarter page.

    I want a JLA minis game so bad.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    Inquisitor wrote: »
    Man, pretty sure Tayrun has got me utterly defeated in our game of AFaoS. My deck is in tatters and he is ahead on VP. I should probably forfeit but I think I will play it out for practice. And on the off chance that Tayrun makes a critical mistake.

    My game again @Jakobagger is interesting, however. He grabbed both settlers right away as the British so I decided to try and dive hard military against him. I am also going French military against Tayrun. It's not something I have much experience doing and it has definitely taught me a few lessons.

    In general as the French I do not think I have been valuing the Intendant enough, I need to get him into my decks sooner, maybe prioritize him over a govenor. Also I think I have been too reactive with my anti-raid strategy, I think I should try getting forts up a lot earlier than I usually do.

    Oh well, lessons for the next games. :D

    Edit: Oh balls I forgot to set my priorities correctly for raid responses again. I really need to force myself to custom tailor my responses each time to my hand before I end my turn. Speaking of lessons. I mean, the game was a lost one anyway, but still.

    Yeah, forts at strategic points are great and something I've prioritized in my games against Tayrun, at least the longer ones. I've mostly been playing for developments, but the two last games I went heavy military: against posh because he bought both settlers early, against Tayrun because my start hand was too perfect for it. In the game with Tayrun I sieged Halifax, Pemaquid, Boston more or less immediately after another. Quickest game I've played I think, and most efficient. Bought nothing but home support and four infantry. Reverse HH? Pemaquid Pounding?

    bgg / steam / goodreads / Bnet: Bygasto#2537
  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    I'm still mad about that. :P

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
    jakobagger
  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    San Juan was a success with the girlfriend last night! Role selection has baffled her in Puerto Rico and Eminent Domain. But I think a game which plays faster, and is boiled down to the essential components of role selection finally clicked. Plus it's a damn fun game in its own right.

    Late as always, I finally got my timelapse done for the article I'm gonna write on X-Wing. I'm starting to regret my decision to always include a timelapse of the game under the rules summary. I enjoyed the idea of it. An abbreviated video of play under an abbreviated set of rules. But in practice its turning into quite the laborious process of forgetting to record one until 3 days before I hit "publish". Regardless of how often I actually play the damn game.

    I think I'm going to start trying to record a timelapse of every game I own. That way when I finally get around to writing reviews for them, I have the video ready to go.

  • cpugeek13cpugeek13 Registered User regular
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    I feel the same way. I traded for it, played it once or twice, and traded it away. Couldn't stand it. Plus the area colors drove my color blindness insane. I was physically incapable of seeing the border between 2 or 3 of the regions.

  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Nah, I've always turned it down. Looks like playing a spreadsheet.

    Le Havre was similarly disappointing for me.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • TimFijiTimFiji Registered User regular
    Do a lot of you use VASSAL to play board games? I am moving to NC soon and my game group and I were discussion options for playing Eclipse online and just curious what you all think about it.

    Switch: SW-2322-2047-3148
    3DS: 5112-3442-2082
    Learn Japanese through video games!
    Steam: Archpriest
  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    I can see why you'd avoid both Power Grid and Le Havre, they're both dry and thinky, very classically "euro", to use a terrible term.

    I find that I love them when I'm in the right mood, and avoid them otherwise.

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
  • VyolynceVyolynce Registered User regular
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Find a copy of The First Sparks if you can. Same Power Grid mechanics/design, 80% less math.

  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Nah, I've always turned it down. Looks like playing a spreadsheet.

    Le Havre was similarly disappointing for me.

    You know, I was discussing Le Havre with a friend of mine. Because I got it on iOS when it was 99 cents. And I am so "meh" about it. I love Agricola. But Le Havre feels too much like it's trying to be Agricola, with more. Twice as many resources. Three times as many actions you can take. And it gives you absolute zero direction, or any sense of if the actions you are taking are better or worse than other actions?

    Like in Agricola, if I plowed a field, that was clearly good. Aside from the gamey factors where it's going to allow me to grow wheat for points, and it's 1 less negative point for empty feels, I got see my farm grow. Even without the rule based reasons, it's clearly good. Le Havre's actions just sort of take place in a vacuum. No clue what's good or bad or anything.

  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Yeah, very nice OP. If there was one thing I would add, it would be Love Letter to filler. For us, thats pretty much the ultimate filler game (small, light, fast). It also makes a damn good drinking game.

    Edit: Also, I just posted a thread on BGG. You guys are welcome to make suggestions if you'd like if you'd like.

    I actually have Love Letter and Roll Through The Ages on my list to add to filler. I'll just add them now and add the blurb later.
    Namrok wrote: »
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    I feel the same way. I traded for it, played it once or twice, and traded it away. Couldn't stand it. Plus the area colors drove my color blindness insane. I was physically incapable of seeing the border between 2 or 3 of the regions.

    Likewise got frustrated with Power Grid. You know what I have now that scratches that itch? Steam! I added that to the "route building/claiming" section, in fact.

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
    jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    My BoardGameGeek profile
    Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
    Duelyst: TheGerm
    (send PM if you send invite)
  • cpugeek13cpugeek13 Registered User regular
    Namrok wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Nah, I've always turned it down. Looks like playing a spreadsheet.

    Le Havre was similarly disappointing for me.

    You know, I was discussing Le Havre with a friend of mine. Because I got it on iOS when it was 99 cents. And I am so "meh" about it. I love Agricola. But Le Havre feels too much like it's trying to be Agricola, with more. Twice as many resources. Three times as many actions you can take. And it gives you absolute zero direction, or any sense of if the actions you are taking are better or worse than other actions?

    Like in Agricola, if I plowed a field, that was clearly good. Aside from the gamey factors where it's going to allow me to grow wheat for points, and it's 1 less negative point for empty feels, I got see my farm grow. Even without the rule based reasons, it's clearly good. Le Havre's actions just sort of take place in a vacuum. No clue what's good or bad or anything.

    Yeah, I feel the same way about Le Havre too. Its just so hard to wrap your head around the choices in that game. I feel like it needs two manuals-- one saying how you can play, another saying how you should play. But then, it wouldn't be very enjoyable either.

  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Namrok wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Nah, I've always turned it down. Looks like playing a spreadsheet.

    Le Havre was similarly disappointing for me.

    You know, I was discussing Le Havre with a friend of mine. Because I got it on iOS when it was 99 cents. And I am so "meh" about it. I love Agricola. But Le Havre feels too much like it's trying to be Agricola, with more. Twice as many resources. Three times as many actions you can take. And it gives you absolute zero direction, or any sense of if the actions you are taking are better or worse than other actions?

    Like in Agricola, if I plowed a field, that was clearly good. Aside from the gamey factors where it's going to allow me to grow wheat for points, and it's 1 less negative point for empty feels, I got see my farm grow. Even without the rule based reasons, it's clearly good. Le Havre's actions just sort of take place in a vacuum. No clue what's good or bad or anything.

    Yeah, I feel the same way about Le Havre too. Its just so hard to wrap your head around the choices in that game. I feel like it needs two manuals-- one saying how you can play, another saying how you should play. But then, it wouldn't be very enjoyable either.

    I actually had the opposite experience. I felt like the classical explanation for the difference between Le Havre and Agricola was very true - when I played Agricola it felt like I was picking the least awful option from a bunch of terrible choices, and in Le Havre I felt like I was picking the most joyful option from a bunch that I'd be happy with any of.

    Though, to be fair, I haven't really "got" Agricola yet.

    Would anyone be up for a game on BaJ, bearing in mind I'd be a new player just learning how not to starve?

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
  • cpugeek13cpugeek13 Registered User regular
    I am always up for Agricola, so sure, I'll play. The ios app for it should be out in the next couple days as well.

  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    I'll play Agricola. Only played twice before, but I liked it. Although I do very much agree it feels like a game where you're trying not to lose/starve, more than trying to win.

    But then I guess that's pretty evocative of the theme, so that's cool.

    bgg / steam / goodreads / Bnet: Bygasto#2537
    jergarmar
  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    Sweet. I'm Tayrun on BaJ, if you'd like to set it up with whatever you consider to be newbie-friendly options.

    I think three or four players would be more fun that two?

    I expect @jakobagger would like to join and kick my ass at yet another game.

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
  • cpugeek13cpugeek13 Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Ok, I set up a three-player family game.

    Also, I totally think we should try to start up a dixit game on BaJ. That sounds like it would be a lot of fun.

    cpugeek13 on
  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    Tag me in for Dixit, sure!

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
  • VyolynceVyolynce Registered User regular
    In for Dixit!

    Agricola loses something on BAJ, I find. You really have to be aware of what everyone can do, and it gets hard to keep track with asynchronous turns. Then again I've only tried it on there once against WBC-caliber players, so...

  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Me too for Dixit please! I am Niallism on BAJ.

    poshniallo on
    I figure I could take a bear.
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    I'm having to reduce my iOS gaming. I have 3 games of Summoner Wars, 10 of Ascension, 3 of Penny Arcade, 1 of Eclipse, 2 of Nightfall, 2 of Titan all on the go, plus some yucata games too.

    I can't keep track and my strategy is going to shit.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • GuibsGuibs Weekend Warrior Somewhere up North.Registered User regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    cpugeek13 wrote: »
    Am I an awful person for not liking Power Grid? I bought it a while ago because of all the praise I'd been hearing, but after playing three games of it, I don't really have any desire to play again. Too mathy, I guess, and too many opportunities for serious AP. I can appreciate the elegance of the design, but the game just isn't that much fun to me.

    Nah, I've always turned it down. Looks like playing a spreadsheet.

    Le Havre was similarly disappointing for me.

    I'm having a hard time getting into Le Havre (on Ios). Wanted to try it to see if I could like it before commiting to the board game but if I'm having issues getting it myself, I doubt my wife and 2 young kids will.

    I've never played Agricola and awaiting the iOS version to finally put my hands on it so I can try it, learn how to play it and see if that is something I could consider for my family.

    jswidget.php?username=Guibs&numitems=10&header=1&text=none&images=small&show=recentplays&imagesonly=1&imagepos=center&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    PSN: Guibs25 | XboxLive: Guibs | Steam: Guibsx | Twitch: Guibsx
  • GuibsGuibs Weekend Warrior Somewhere up North.Registered User regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I'm having to reduce my iOS gaming. I have 3 games of Summoner Wars, 10 of Ascension, 3 of Penny Arcade, 1 of Eclipse, 2 of Nightfall, 2 of Titan all on the go, plus some yucata games too.

    I can't keep track and my strategy is going to shit.

    Lol, I had a similar moment at one point. I'm now playing only 2 or 3 games at onces with all games combined.

    jswidget.php?username=Guibs&numitems=10&header=1&text=none&images=small&show=recentplays&imagesonly=1&imagepos=center&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    PSN: Guibs25 | XboxLive: Guibs | Steam: Guibsx | Twitch: Guibsx
  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    The worst is playing more than one session of the same game simultaneously, I find. But also I probably need to begin using the note feature in a lot of my games.

    bgg / steam / goodreads / Bnet: Bygasto#2537
  • antheremantherem Registered User regular
    Hey @jergarmar can we get something in the OP about OCTGN/Vassal/BSW/BAJ?

  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    antherem wrote: »
    Hey @jergarmar can we get something in the OP about OCTGN/Vassal/BSW/BAJ?

    Oh, good idea. But I'm a little lacking in knowledge here. Besides Vassal, what would you say are the best games implemented on those sites? I don't want to list ALL of the games on each site, just a good place to get started.

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
    jswidget.php?username=jergarmar&numitems=7&text=none&images=small&show=hot10&imagesonly=1&imagepos=right&inline=1&domains%5B%5D=boardgame&imagewidget=1
    My BoardGameGeek profile
    Battle.net: TheGerm#1430 (Hearthstone, HotS)
    Duelyst: TheGerm
    (send PM if you send invite)
  • TrynantTrynant Maniac Brawler Rank 20.100 and full WildRegistered User regular
    Mmmm, new thread smell.

    I recorded a video of Roads & Boats getting played with my father. I don't know about the video quality, but the game is really good. I've played it at least 6 times in the past couple of weeks (for a four-hour game we're talking about a lot of hours of play). The fact that you draw the roads on a clear plastic overlay is pretty easily the coolest part of the game.

    Also got to play Antiquity again, and I barely scraped by with a win due to the tie-breaker (most unpolluted hexes in zone of control). That both of us met our victory condtions at the same time was very impressive. As for the game, it's still pretty fiddly but ultimately really enjoyable for people looking for a tough, analytical game. If you thought the harvest phase in Agricola was too forgiving, Antiquity is for you.

  • TayrunTayrun Registered User regular
    jergarmar wrote: »
    antherem wrote: »
    Hey @jergarmar can we get something in the OP about OCTGN/Vassal/BSW/BAJ?

    Oh, good idea. But I'm a little lacking in knowledge here. Besides Vassal, what would you say are the best games implemented on those sites? I don't want to list ALL of the games on each site, just a good place to get started.

    OCTGN is Android:Netrunner and ONLY Android:Netrunner there is only one card game that exists lalalalalala.

    3DS: 5257-9337-8263
  • admanbadmanb the bored genie Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I'm having to reduce my iOS gaming. I have 3 games of Summoner Wars, 10 of Ascension, 3 of Penny Arcade, 1 of Eclipse, 2 of Nightfall, 2 of Titan all on the go, plus some yucata games too.

    I can't keep track and my strategy is going to shit.

    I've had moments like that.

    On an unrelated subject, I was surprised to learn I never bought Titan. How does it play?

  • TrynantTrynant Maniac Brawler Rank 20.100 and full WildRegistered User regular
    admanb wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    I'm having to reduce my iOS gaming. I have 3 games of Summoner Wars, 10 of Ascension, 3 of Penny Arcade, 1 of Eclipse, 2 of Nightfall, 2 of Titan all on the go, plus some yucata games too.

    I can't keep track and my strategy is going to shit.

    I've had moments like that.

    On an unrelated subject, I was surprised to learn I never bought Titan. How does it play?

    Titan the iOS might be fun, but the board game is pretty much broken if you go with more than two players. Player elimination + hours of game + battles are giant conflicts that only include two of the multiple players involved = NOPE NOPE NOPE.

    blahmcblah
«134567108
This discussion has been closed.