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Strip Search - Elimination #8

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Posts

  • BibliotekkaBibliotekka Registered User new member
    If I wasn't before after this I am definitively on TEAM TANGENT!!

    I kind of want an Abby/Katie Final!

    I also love that in a competition for a prize in a male dominated field the ladies are dominating.

    go ladies.

    KadiSpman2099miaAusa
  • jonathanmichaelsjonathanmichaels Archduke of Levity Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    The first time I saw Abby's work, in the battle with Erika, I immediately thought of Kate Beaton, and not in the good way.

    I can't be the only one who thinks she's copying Beaton too much.

    Solidly rooting for a Lexxy-Katie final, I just find their stuff to be more original, I like Maki, but his strip just doesn't work for me.

    jonathanmichaels on
  • FrodoLivesFrodoLives Registered User regular
    "Tavis Bot"? I like it - where do I sign up?

  • ExarchExarch Registered User regular
    I enjoy Abby's art, but greatly dislike her as depicted by the show. I don't really get why anyone is rooting for her, though clearly I'm vastly outnumbered/the only one hehe. She's a strong competitor in the eliminations though, I'll give her that. No doubt she deserved to win each time, personal factors aside.

    pseudo edit: I'm also rooting for Lexxy-Katie.

    No gods or kings, only man.
    LoL: BunyipAristocrat
  • EvermournEvermourn Registered User regular
    The first time I saw Abby's work, in the battle with Erika, I immediately thought of Kate Beaton, and not in the good way.
    I can't be the only one who thinks she's copying Beaton too much.
    I think you'll find this has already been done to death in previous threads. Summary: You're not the only one, but there aren't many of you.

    deathbearsSpman2099Azamino
  • Xander25Xander25 Registered User regular
    Okay...I don't get the joke in Abby's comic even a little bit.

    Someone explain it, please?

  • WordLustWordLust Registered User regular
    Xander25 wrote: »
    Okay...I don't get the joke in Abby's comic even a little bit.

    Someone explain it, please?

    The soul of the humor in this strip is not wit, so if your taste in comedy is primarily for wit, you probably did not find the comic especially nourishing.

    Since it's not based on wit, there really isn't anything to "get". Either silliness tickles your fancy or it doesn't. Some people don't find Monty Python very funny, for example. WHICH IS CRAZY. But true.

    emarecksaykay
  • MatiasGMatiasG Registered User regular
    @JONATHANMICHAELS

    Dude, I also thought her work was very similar to Beaton's! I don't think it's a negative thing though. I think her dry wit is very funny.

    Spman2099
  • lrsimpsonlrsimpson Registered User new member
    Hahahaha!!!! Oh man! tears in my eyes! I think I just woke my neighbors. Thanks a lot Abby, now I'm going to be evicted

    Spman2099emarecksaykay
  • GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Okay, so seeing as we're getting into the endgame, my thoughts are turning to the nature of the final reward. The last reward handed out in reality competitions has a tendency to be the biggest one. You know how Survivor loves handing out cars towards the end. So if that held here, it'd have to be bigger than anything we've seen so far. We've got a Wacom Cintiq HD ($1,999 for a 22HD; I don't know for sure what size Lexxy got but that's the size I think they displayed in the episode), a Wacom Intuos 5 tablet ($229), a NYCC Artists Alley booth ($500), a First Party wardrobe ($417.94 for one each of the clothing items, plus another $17.99 if you throw in the notebook set), a Black Ink Pro Kit and Airbrush Set from Copic ($514.97 for the airbrush stuff and $53.07 for the black ink kit, total $568.04), and the shirt design going in the PA store (whatever unknown amount of money Amy got out of that) to beat.

    There are two things I can think of that would qualify. I'm not sure if we've hit all the show sponsors yet; I'm unsure as to whether we've seen Power Notebooks represented. If not, the prize is pretty much coming from them; likely a laptop. If we have seen them suitably represented, I would think the thing to note is that, aside from Tavis being awarded the black ink kit from Copic, when artists have been given Copics to use in challenges, they had to give them back afterwards. My thinking is, Power Notebooks aside, that's the other major option for the Big Reward: a full set of sketch markers. (One single sketch marker- one marker- runs you $7.99. A 72-piece set costs $575.28, and there are five different sets, totaling $2,876.40 for 358 colors. That's a big damn price tag... and a relatively modest amount above the $2,200+ price Power Notebooks is asking for Alienware laptops.)

    Granted, this is probably the last thing on their minds, and they may not even be following the Big Endgame Reward model here, but it's fun to guess.

    Gosling on
    I have a new soccer blog The Minnow Tank. Reading it psychically kicks Sepp Blatter in the bean bag.
    emarecksaykay
  • Yasmine TeethYasmine Teeth Registered User regular
    It just dawned on me that some people are probably spending more time writing in and reading this discussion of the competition than Mike and Jerry spent being the actual judges of it.

    Azamino
  • DeepwaterDeepwater Registered User regular
    This is such a good episode, you guys. Also, I've had my heart-on for Abby since the start –- she cracks me up like just a handful of others do. If she wins, we're getting a year of quality content. She's got her style, artistically, and while it suits her jokes and whatnot, anyone can see (I think) that the rest of the competitors will churn out a more artistically interesting comic in a year with PA.
    I doubt if anyone will crack me up as often, though.

    emarecksaykay
  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    Xander25 wrote: »
    Okay...I don't get the joke in Abby's comic even a little bit.

    Someone explain it, please?

    Okay, I think I can try.

    Basically, right... it's really funny.

    That's all I got.

    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
  • LampLamp Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Xander25 wrote: »
    Okay...I don't get the joke in Abby's comic even a little bit.

    Someone explain it, please?

    Ok I'll take a crack at this. Abby's comic doesn't contain a "joke" in the traditional sense. There is no setup and punchline. Instead the humor comes from irony. The doctor and patient are put into an absurd situation, but their reactions are completely subdued relative to the situation at hand. Instead of freaking out the Doc just says "Why is this cat here?... Oh well, prep him for surgery to remove it, I guess", and the patient just looks confused and not particularly concerned; both are ridiculous reactions and subvert our expectations (irony).

    Now the "punch" comes from cranking up the absurdity in the final panel. Somehow, against all reason and logic, the patient has ANOTHER cat sewed onto him; yet despite the increase in absurdity Abby continues to play her characters straight. That's what draws a laugh at the end.

    This sort of humor is Abby's specialty and one of her big advantages. She doesn't need to rely on crafting the perfect punchline to get a laugh. She puts her characters into strange, surreal situations and it's the LACK of reaction that's funny. Her characters are just as confused as we are but for some reason they take it all in stride.

    Lamp on
    KazitronsketchityWordLustBuchoparmeisanemarecksaykayminor incident
  • eagleagl Registered User regular
    It'll be so sad if Katie and Maki go up against one another. That's a lose/lose situation for everyone involved.

    Really? I think it's a win win, since we'll see 2 artists we like getting a chance to show their stuff when it really counts. That matchup says win all over it. The fact that one person "goes home" afterwards after getting so much good experience and publicity makes being a loser, in this context, a pretty darn nice consolation prize. Any "loss" that puts me up in front of a million people in a favorable manner is a loss I'll happily take. Yea winning the whole banana would be *nicer*, but losing the game at this point is still a pretty huge win I think. These matchups are WIN for everyone.

  • Dark Raven XDark Raven X The woods are lovely dark and deepRegistered User regular
    Took a few weeks off, all caught up with a Strip Search Dump.

    Abby continues to be da best, naturally.

    That said! I did note that Abby's only tangentially used one of the topics, much the same way Amy's did (when they gave her so much shit for it) and that's kinda weird.

    I mean, it was so funny that maybe it didn't matter.

    But still.

    And miles to go before I sleep.
  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    Okay, I'll try properly. The comic isn't ironic in any way, there is no irony here. It is pure unbridled absurdity. The humour in the second panel comes from the absurdity of the situation. The humour in the third panel can be read in many different ways, depending on how you look at it. The humour at the end just comes from an escalation of the absurdity.

    This isn't wordplay, or a pun, or irony, or situation comedy. It's not even really slapstick. It's just ridiculous, and it's funny because it's ridiculous. There's an immediacy in the punch that comes from the surprise, so either you laugh or you don't - you're not going to laugh after you sit down and think about it.

    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
    Spman2099Azamino
  • GiftsOfMenGiftsOfMen Registered User regular
    Abby's been my favorite since I checked out the artist profiles before the first episode aired. Team Abby!

  • SejarkiSejarki Registered User regular
    I don't feel like we're talking about the tangent in Tavis's comic enough.

    MekkaBemarecksaykay
  • sketchitysketchity Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    @Ahdok from merriam-webster: "Irony - 3a (1) : incongruity between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result (2) : an event or result marked by such incongruity"

    @DarkRavenX amy only mentioned mermaids, and then goes so far as to say that mermaids are not what the characters are talking about in the comic. abby doesn't directly depict the challenge topic, either, but it is an off-screen actor that definitely has a major impact on the situation depicted.

    sketchity on
    parmeisan
  • LampLamp Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    sketchity wrote: »
    @Ahdok from merriam-webster: "Irony - 3a (1) : incongruity between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result (2) : an event or result marked by such incongruity"

    Yep. I think some of the colloquial understandings of the term fall a bit short. There are different types of irony and IMO the situation portrayed by Abby's comic easily qualifies as situation irony, as described above. Check the Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony


    BUT I'd rather not argue over semantics when it's really irrelevant to the main point, which is that the humor in Abby's comic definitely does not come from pure silliness or ridiculousness. It comes from characters reacting to a silly situation in an unexpected way. A live cat being grafted onto a patient's skin for no apparent reason is plenty ridiculous by itself, but played a certain way that premise could easily be horrifying instead of funny. The humor in the strip exists because those expectations are turned on their head.

    Lamp on
    WordLustparmeisanBucho
  • FrodoLivesFrodoLives Registered User regular
    I laughed at Abby's comic initially. I read it again and . . . nothing. I hope she does better next time. I like her.

  • Twenty SidedTwenty Sided Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Lamp wrote: »
    Xander25 wrote: »
    Okay...I don't get the joke in Abby's comic even a little bit.

    Someone explain it, please?

    Ok I'll take a crack at this. Abby's comic doesn't contain a "joke" in the traditional sense. There is no setup and punchline. Instead the humor comes from irony. The doctor and patient are put into an absurd situation, but their reactions are completely subdued relative to the situation at hand. Instead of freaking out the Doc just says "Why is this cat here?... Oh well, prep him for surgery to remove it, I guess", and the patient just looks confused and not particularly concerned; both are ridiculous reactions and subvert our expectations (irony).

    Now the "punch" comes from cranking up the absurdity in the final panel. Somehow, against all reason and logic, the patient has ANOTHER cat sewed onto him; yet despite the increase in absurdity Abby continues to play her characters straight. That's what draws a laugh at the end.

    This sort of humor is Abby's specialty and one of her big advantages. She doesn't need to rely on crafting the perfect punchline to get a laugh. She puts her characters into strange, surreal situations and it's the LACK of reaction that's funny. Her characters are just as confused as we are but for some reason they take it all in stride.

    It's also that the cats are just being cats. Pleased as punch and indifferent to being sown into the torso of a man.

    Abby's style goes a long way in conveying a sense of fun about the whole thing. That's the whole "Kate Beaton" vibe, which I don't think is a bad thing.
    It's her delivery that helps to carry things through, even if there isn't really a structured joke with a punchline.

    Twenty Sided on
    emarecksaykay
  • Twenty SidedTwenty Sided Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    People are also way to hung up on what proper irony is supposed to be. I stopped caring a long time ago.
    The basic gist of it, is that irony is the subversion of some kind of expectation, sometimes for emphasis. You can stuff all your adjectives and qualifiers.

    Twenty Sided on
    GiftsOfMenMekkaBkekrops_A Concerned Citizenemarecksaykay
  • KalTorakKalTorak Way up inside your butthole, Morty. WAAAAY up inside there.Registered User regular
    It just dawned on me that some people are probably spending more time writing in and reading this discussion of the competition than Mike and Jerry spent being the actual judges of it.

    That's probably not that uncommon. I'm sure more time has been spent analyzing and writing about (for example) Star Trek than all the years of Gene Roddenberry's life.

    emarecksaykay
  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    Which of the characters in Abby's strip are reacting in an unexpected way? the patient looks terrified, the doctor reacts pretty much how I expect a doctor to do so. The cat gives no fucks, which is about how I expect cats to act all of the time. :)

    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    Just because mike and jerry throw one strip out for "not using the themes" doesn't make this a hard and fast primary rule about the way they're judging.

    Mike and Jerry are just looking at the two strips and picking the one they like best. That's all. If you start constructing arbitrary frameworks and rules for their judgements, and applying them to different situations then you're going to fall down.

    "This one uses the themes better" is always going to be a factor, but it's a bit silly to apply the logic that separated two comics to be a sole rule to separate two entirely different comics.

    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
    A Concerned Citizenemarecksaykay
  • DevoninDevonin Registered User regular
    FrodoLives wrote: »
    I laughed at Abby's comic initially. I read it again and . . . nothing. I hope she does better next time. I like her.

    The problem with absurdity is that it is really only funny as an unexpected thing. Once you know what is going to happen, it loses the punch. Finding the comic less funny with each reading is just going to happen with that style of humour, but that first reaction is the key one.

  • LampLamp Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    ahdok wrote: »
    Which of the characters in Abby's strip are reacting in an unexpected way? the patient looks terrified, the doctor reacts pretty much how I expect a doctor to do so. The cat gives no fucks, which is about how I expect cats to act all of the time. :)

    Really? If a live animal got stitched into a patient's torso you'd expect the doctor to call on someone to fix it before he even gets an answer to *how* or *why* this happened? You'd expect him to act as if the whole thing was just some kind of weird accident? Then you would expect him to walk away and not check on the patient again until after *another* surgery, when during the previous surgery a *live animal* was stitched to the patient? And upon seeing the result -- ANOTHER live animal has been grafted on -- his reaction would simply be to scratch his chin and mutter "Well Goddammit," the sort of reaction someone gives when they realize they forgot to grab their lunch out of the fridge before driving to work?

    Imagine a horror movie (or a horror comic for that matter) where a crazed surgeon surgically attaches live animals onto patients during surgery. Now imagine what the reaction of the patient and the doctor would be in that story. Probably a lot closer to how people would really react in that situation: the patient is terrified, the doctor is filled with revulsion and dread, the cat is kicking helplessly and mewing in obvious pain and discomfort. Now ask yourself why that scene wouldn't be funny, even though it has the same setup. You say the humor in Abby's comic comes simply from "ridiculousness." Well, my hypothetical horror story has the same setup, but different reaction from the characters, and gets no laughs. That's because in Abby's story it's the REACTIONS of the characters that is truly ridiculous. And why is it ridiculous? Because it's nothing like you would expect someone to really react in that situation.

    Lamp on
    emarecksaykayminor incident
  • alironaliron Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Lamp wrote: »
    Imagine a horror movie where a crazed surgeon surgically attaches live animals onto patients during surgery. Now imagine what the reaction of the patient and the doctor would be in that film. Probably a lot closer to how people would really react in that situation. Now ask yourself why that scene wouldn't be funny, even though it has the same setup. You say the humor in Abby's comic comes simply from "ridiculousness." Well, my hypothetical horror story has the same setup, but different reaction from the characters, and gets no laughs. That's because in Abby's story it's the REACTIONS of the characters that is truly ridiculous. And why is it ridiculous? Because it's nothing like you would expect someone to really react in that situation.

    The ridiculousness comes from having another cat sewn onto the initial cat (as if that wasn't absurd enough). That's the main twist...not the blase reaction of the characters. Although that might be part of the humor--the strip might be less funny if the doctor and everyone else was freaking out the whole time.

    I don't want to be drawn into the irony definition discussion but the punchline is based on irony...everyone expects the cat to be removed but the exact opposite happened.

    aliron on
    parmeisanYasmine Teeth
  • WordLustWordLust Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    I agree with Lamp. I also agree with him about it being a form of irony.

    I compared it to Monty Python style humor for the very reasons Lamp is describing. You will notice that in a great many of Monty Python's best sketches, the intensity of the humor arises from a contrast between what the audience knows and what the characters know. This isn't the only situation where such a contrast is used. For example, many stories create suspense through the use of Dramatic Irony, where the audience knows a bit of critical information of which the characters are oblivious. So, for example, YOU know that the protagonist should not open the basement door because there is a monster down there, but the protagonist does NOT know about the monster, so when the audience watches the protagonist stroll toward the door without a care in the world, it makes the audience tense, because they know there will be consequences, and they are powerless to stop them.

    What Abby does here, and what Monty Python often does, is very similar to Dramatic Irony. What the audience knows in the Abby strip (or in a Monty Python sketch) that the characters do not know is that the entire situation is unbelievably ridiculous in the most literal sense. That is to say that the events unfolding before the audience are so ridiculous that no one in the audience would for a second believe that they are intended to portray anything like reality. Not even a FICTIONAL reality. They are obviously and intentionally unreal. It is clear that the authors have purposefully launched this story so far out of reality's atmosphere that there can be no mistake: they never intended to convey a reality in the first place. THIS is what the audience knows.

    But the IRONY is that the characters within the story do NOT know this. To them, this completely absurd and utter silliness is serious business. They don't laugh at what is obviously funny. They don't call bullshit on things that could never in a million years possibly be true. It doesn't matter if a man torn in half has had a cat sewn into his midsection or if the King of England is galloping across the land on an invisible horse while a man walks behind him and bangs two coconuts together. The people in both of these worlds perceive these situations as reality. They perceive nothing out of the ordinary. They see nothing ridiculous about it.

    That we know these situations are utter absurdity taken to the height of exaggeration and that the characters are, seemingly, completely oblivious to this obvious fact is the heart of the joke. Per the Monty Python formula, the more ridiculous you make the scene as it goes along and the more you intensify the contrast between the audience's and the character's perception of the scene, the funnier it gets.

    EDIT:

    I would agree that expecting the cat to either be removed or fail to be removed and then having an unexpected THIRD possibility introduced (another cat sewn on) is also ironic.

    The fact that it is never explained or even suggested how the cats are getting there also contributes to the joke.

    WordLust on
    Lampemarecksaykay
  • DevoninDevonin Registered User regular
    E B White wrote:
    “Explaining a joke is like dissecting a frog. You understand it better but the frog dies in the process.”

    emarecksaykay
  • coltclassiccoltclassic Registered User regular
    Here's hoping Abby succeeds in her endeavors. Both of her elimination strips keep me and my friends laughing. That last panel with the doctor's reaction is too much for my funny bone

    emarecksaykay
  • eagleagl Registered User regular
    Speaking of the remaining prizes... Did Mike have his MS surface pro before the show was filmed? Seems like giving all the strippers one of those would be a good way for MS to pay back some of the free publicity Mike has been giving them. Or MS could give every PA fan one, because I want one too.

  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    Lamp wrote: »
    Really? If a live animal got stitched into a patient's torso you'd expect the doctor to call on someone to fix it before he even gets an answer to *how* or *why* this happened? You'd expect him to act as if the whole thing was just some kind of weird accident? Then you would expect him to walk away and not check on the patient again until after *another* surgery, when during the previous surgery a *live animal* was stitched to the patient? And upon seeing the result -- ANOTHER live animal has been grafted on -- his reaction would simply be to scratch his chin and mutter "Well Goddammit," the sort of reaction someone gives when they realize they forgot to grab their lunch out of the fridge before driving to work?

    That's NHS hospitals for you.

    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
    A Concerned Citizen
  • NijhazerNijhazer Sunnyvale, CARegistered User regular
    So, let me get this straight:

    You're a cartoonist. You spend so much time worrying about your art-- you take art classes, you draw every day, you spend hours and hours crafting each strip, getting the lines and the colors just right... But when folks read it, all they're looking for is a joke, and if the joke isn't funny, your strip is instantly discarded.

    One day, you're selected to enter a cartooning competition, in which your work will be judged by the best-known cartoonist on the Web. You create a strip, and when he reads it, all he's looking for is a joke, and if the joke isn't funny, your strip is instantly discarded.

    The life of a cartoonist seems terrible.

    kekrops_Yasmine Teethwahay
  • eobeteobet Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    shiser wrote: »
    Fatal mistake by Tavis in basing the comic on a business that has no franchises in the Pacific Northwest (where the judges live). I had no idea there was even a joke in the comic until I looked up the name he referenced (had never heard of that business or seen their cars) and found out it actually was funny.

    Yeah, wow. I heard he said "something" car, but since it wasn't clear and utterly unfamiliar to me, I just brushed it off. Looking up "Truly Nolen" definitely took his strip from a huh to a haha.
    Still would have picked Abby's, but at least some insight into what Tavis was going for was nice, and I'm sure that people for whom the reference "clicked" would actually have found it funny from the get-go, rather than just surreal.

    PHOTO_13568666_63278_21932090_ap_420X315.jpg

    Or at least differently surreal ;-)

    Oh, that strip suddenly makes sense now. He should have used a more recognizable vehicle, though, like the Pussy Wagon from Kill Bill for example.

    Also, several small cats hanging on to the car instead of one large one (obscuring some of the recognizable car features even) would have worked better, but perhaps he ran out of time.

    But yeah, the other one also made me laugh out loud. And like others have said, feels very much like Kate Beaton's style (+Allie Brosh imo) but that's not a bad thing because she rocks it!

    eobet on
    Heard the proposition that RIAA and MPAA should join forces and form "Music And Film Industry Association"?
  • ahdokahdok Figment of your imagination Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    In all seriousness.

    1) I think the reaction of "that guy has a cat sewn into him, we need to get him into surgery at once" and "now that guy has two cats sewn into him... goddamnit" are pretty sensible reactions to those situations. They might not be the only reactions to those situations, but they're not particularly zany ones.

    2) There is a difference between irony and non-sequitur. For something to be truly ironic, the result of events has to be in some way linked to said history of events (for example, it's ironic that the man who invented the guillotine was killed with one.) - You could argue that it's ironic that the result of removing a cat is to get another cat, but I wouldn't make that argument, when I can just revel in unbridled silliness instead.

    This might be a subtle sense difference in the use of words from across the pond though.
    Nijhazer wrote: »
    So, let me get this straight:

    You're a cartoonist. You spend so much time worrying about your art-- you take art classes, you draw every day, you spend hours and hours crafting each strip, getting the lines and the colors just right... But when folks read it, all they're looking for is a joke, and if the joke isn't funny, your strip is instantly discarded.

    One day, you're selected to enter a cartooning competition, in which your work will be judged by the best-known cartoonist on the Web. You create a strip, and when he reads it, all he's looking for is a joke, and if the joke isn't funny, your strip is instantly discarded.

    The life of a cartoonist seems terrible.

    If I spend 90 minutes drawing a strip for "cats/cars" then the post gets three positive votes. If I spend 5 seconds taking a screencap of the latest episode page and posting it to the forum, that post gets 13 positive votes. :)

    ahdok on
    http://www.socksandpuppets.com for comics, art and other junk.
    miaAusaemarecksaykay
  • LampLamp Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    ahdok wrote: »
    In all seriousness.
    1) I think the reaction of "that guy has a cat sewn into him, we need to get him into surgery at once" and "now that guy has two cats sewn into him... goddamnit" are pretty sensible reactions to those situations. They might not be the only reactions to those situations, but they're not particularly zany ones.

    Ok, let's examine a different aspect of the story in Abby's strip that we haven't really touched on. The patient didn't just have a live cat sewn into his torso -- this happened while the surgeon was "reattaching his lower half." Even in this aspect the story is unreal and impossible; you don't just "reattach" someone's legs and pelvis after they've been ripped apart in a car crash. And yet the doctor's is describing the operation as if it is totally normal. To him, it is reasonable to state "yep, the guy was ripped in half, but we sewed him back together and he's good as new" as if the operation requires no further explanation; as if it ISN'T ridiculous and impossible, even though (to us, the audience) it obviously is.

    Perhaps this example will illustrate the contrast between how these characters approach the surreal situation they find themselves in (as if it is normal, albeit unfortunate), vs. how you would expect a real person to react (probably with horror and outrage if not outright disbelief) If not then I guess this conversation is hopeless.

    ahdok wrote: »
    2) There is a difference between irony and non-sequitur. For something to be truly ironic, the result of events has to be in some way linked to said history of events (for example, it's ironic that the man who invented the guillotine was killed with one.) - You could argue that it's ironic that the result of removing a cat is to get another cat, but I wouldn't make that argument, when I can just revel in unbridled silliness instead.

    Actually your guillotine example is consistent with the concept of irony but the link you describe is not actually a necessary component of irony; although I will concede that your description matches the colloquial definition most people operate under, the concept of irony as a literary technique is actually quite a bit broader than that. More importantly, who cares about semantics. It's pointless to argue about whether we're describing the concept with the right word. The point is that I'm talking about a specific technique which highlights an incongruity between the actual result of a situation and the normal or expected result. Call it "smirony" for all I care.

    Lamp on
    emarecksaykay
  • DevoninDevonin Registered User regular
    Irony Smirony

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