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[Roleplaying Games] Play Everything, Only GM the Games You Want To

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Posts

  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    Ah the joy of backing a new kickstarter.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    New Bundle of Holding is up. It's full of Champions.

  • RingoRingo He/Him Bury me at Lone Tree DenRegistered User regular
    Glazius wrote: »
    If you're fine with that, you'll be fine with Numenera. I, however, am looting it viciously for a Fate Accelerated hack.

    You're not the only one, @Glazius‌

    http://talescorps.tumblr.com/

    Unless, of course, that's you

    (My friends and I are just starting a FATE Numenera game, but we've decided to run with FATE Core as it's more familiar)

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Starting a Torchbearer game tonight, should be an interesting change of pace from D&D.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    Vanguard
  • InkSplatInkSplat 100%ed Bad Rats. Registered User regular
    So, I was thinking of running a Android: Netrunner FATE game to learn the system (so, obviously you'd have to be willing to put up with that. :stuck_out_tongue: ) (though, after seeing the new Destiny live action trailer, I'm tempted to run a game in that setting instead, ha.)

    Would anyone be interested in playing a short little adventure in which there will likely be a bit of floundering?

    Origin for Dragon Age: Inquisition Shenanigans: Inksplat776
    jakobagger
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Hachface wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    The issue with the oWoD is that the books never really imparted what a game looked like. It was very hard to read those and get a sense of what the average session looked like and, if you didn't have someone to show you the way, the game probably died after a session or two.

    This.
    To use a term coined in this insightful RPG.net post, oWoD games tended to suffer from a lack of obvious rut.

    On this topic, what is the expected "rut" in a game of nWoD? I'd like to run a plain mortals game, but I'm not at all sure how to go about it. The book throws in several appropriately spooky and mysterious scenes almost as an afterthought, but doesn't give you any guidance on where to take them.

    I can think of several "ruts" and their disadvantages:
    1. If you give the players things they can fight, it stops being a horror game and starts being "badasses vs the Darkness".
    2. If you give the players things they can't fight, it quickly becomes frustrating.
    3. If you give the players challenges that can only be overcome in unconventional or symbolically-appropriate ways (like destroying the pocketwatch in the Nightmare at Hill Manor published scenario), it devolves into puzzle-of-the-week, which will be boring and/or frustrating depending on the GM's skill.

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    My first personal experience of oWoD is a bunch of Goth people digging into vampire lore and identifying with the dark broodiness of the whole affair, while only marginally playing an RPG on the side. For those people, it was more of a lifestyle choice than a game that they played on weekends. I'm fully aware that my "vampire groupie Goth lifestyle" exposure probably wasn't the game that was intended (especially when I played through some of the Vampire computer games), but everyone has their own different kinks I guess. Everyone has some sort of identity issues... some folks just choose to identify as pale people with fangs.

    If you are playing an all-mortal campaign, like Hunter, there's nothing wrong with setting up like an episodic television show where you have the "mystery of the week" like X-Files or Fringe, as long as everyone is on board with it. There's also nothing wrong with going on a hack-and-slash kill'em-all approach, either. And if you are running a Scooby-Doo campaign, the "running away" aspect might even be appropriate. :D

    Di87pOF.jpg
    PSN: Hahnsoo | MH Rise: Hahnsoo, Switch FC: SW-0085-2679-5212
  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    Hachface wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    The issue with the oWoD is that the books never really imparted what a game looked like. It was very hard to read those and get a sense of what the average session looked like and, if you didn't have someone to show you the way, the game probably died after a session or two.

    This.
    To use a term coined in this insightful RPG.net post, oWoD games tended to suffer from a lack of obvious rut.

    On this topic, what is the expected "rut" in a game of nWoD? I'd like to run a plain mortals game, but I'm not at all sure how to go about it. The book throws in several appropriately spooky and mysterious scenes almost as an afterthought, but doesn't give you any guidance on where to take them.

    I can think of several "ruts" and their disadvantages:
    1. If you give the players things they can fight, it stops being a horror game and starts being "badasses vs the Darkness".
    2. If you give the players things they can't fight, it quickly becomes frustrating.
    3. If you give the players challenges that can only be overcome in unconventional or symbolically-appropriate ways (like destroying the pocketwatch in the Nightmare at Hill Manor published scenario), it devolves into puzzle-of-the-week, which will be boring and/or frustrating depending on the GM's skill.

    If I ran a mortals game, I'd probably do something like the Friday the 13th TV show with some x-files mixed in. I'd be looking at a mixture of second tier kind of monsters. Some of the lower end slashers, spirits, and relics. The idea for mortals is weird. The other splats are Weird + Politics but for mortals it's about more them seeing the weird and those would be the elements I focus on. Maybe it's a monster of the week they can beat like a slasher. Maybe it's something they can just contain like the plans of a Immortal.

    Then you have stuff like Innocents which as a very focused rut to play in.

  • HuddsHudds Fool Just Outside TimeRegistered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    Hachface wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    The issue with the oWoD is that the books never really imparted what a game looked like. It was very hard to read those and get a sense of what the average session looked like and, if you didn't have someone to show you the way, the game probably died after a session or two.

    This.
    To use a term coined in this insightful RPG.net post, oWoD games tended to suffer from a lack of obvious rut.

    On this topic, what is the expected "rut" in a game of nWoD? I'd like to run a plain mortals game, but I'm not at all sure how to go about it. The book throws in several appropriately spooky and mysterious scenes almost as an afterthought, but doesn't give you any guidance on where to take them.

    I can think of several "ruts" and their disadvantages:
    1. If you give the players things they can fight, it stops being a horror game and starts being "badasses vs the Darkness".
    2. If you give the players things they can't fight, it quickly becomes frustrating.
    3. If you give the players challenges that can only be overcome in unconventional or symbolically-appropriate ways (like destroying the pocketwatch in the Nightmare at Hill Manor published scenario), it devolves into puzzle-of-the-week, which will be boring and/or frustrating depending on the GM's skill.

    Core book/Mortals games are kinda rough on finding a "rut" to get into. I always tried to make it a mix of 1 and 3. I always made sure there were minions around for the combat-oriented folks to get their game on with and puzzles and such to overcome the main antagonist.

    If you focus on atmosphere and exploration it's a bit easier to keep it horror. Some of the main WoD books that don't fall under a "Splat: The Splooshing" do a good job of showing the kinds of things that build the world outside of the specific supernatural creature types. Midnight Roads has some cool stuff for the highways and back roads of the WoD, Tales from the 13th Precinct covers police stories, Slasher does the serial killer genre... There's a lot of good setting stuff out there depending on what you're looking for.

    nWoD has less "rut" than oWoD because there isn't as much focus on the overall metaplot. It's a lot more what you make of it.

  • ElbasunuElbasunu Registered User regular
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...

    g1xfUKU.png?10zfegkyoor3b.png
    Steam ID: Obos Vent: Obos
  • RingoRingo He/Him Bury me at Lone Tree DenRegistered User regular
    InkSplat wrote: »
    So, I was thinking of running a Android: Netrunner FATE game to learn the system (so, obviously you'd have to be willing to put up with that. :stuck_out_tongue: ) (though, after seeing the new Destiny live action trailer, I'm tempted to run a game in that setting instead, ha.)

    Would anyone be interested in playing a short little adventure in which there will likely be a bit of floundering?

    I would be interested @InkSplat

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...

    It's the question of what do we do in this game. So with D&D it's kill monsters, take their loot. With Shadowrun it's make an elaborate plan to steal stuff then throw out that plan when it's time to steal stuff.

    ElbasunuElvenshae
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...
    Read Hachface's link:
    http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?433358-Crunch-fluff-and-the-other-thing

    But in short, it's "Here's a path for how you are going to play each session." Also "What do the PCs actually DO?"

    For example, in Shadowrun, it's pretty obvious... you are Shadowrunners who go on Shadowruns, which are illegal missions done on the behalf of corporations under the guise of plausible deniability and secrecy.

    In Dungeons and Dragons, it's usually "You are a party of adventurers... go forth into the world and kill a bunch of monsters and grab the loot while leveling up."

    Stargate SG-1 "We go through the gate, we get into trouble, we fix the problems, we leave (and let the SGC or Daniel Jackson sort it out later)"

    I don't like the term "rut" either. :-P

    Hahnsoo1 on
    Di87pOF.jpg
    PSN: Hahnsoo | MH Rise: Hahnsoo, Switch FC: SW-0085-2679-5212
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    You could run something where it isn't about killing the monsters but understanding them. Scientists studying werewolves and vampires, trying the find the "science" behind magic, ect. It let's your players decide the path, let them come up with how certain things work (even if it isn't what the other games say blah works) and throw in conspiracy and government politics, something between Supernatural, X-Files, and Alphas.

  • RendRend Registered User regular
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...

    In this context you have "crunch" which are the rules of the game, "fluff" which is the settings, and "rut" which is what you do.

    To be topical about it, every game in this thread uses the same crunch (FATE), but every game uses different fluff (star ward, android, etc). The originally linked post has a pretty good example of rut:
    http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?433358-Crunch-fluff-and-the-other-thing
    that post wrote:
    So what is rut?

    It's the mode of play. It's what PCs actually do for their living. I'll name a few examples to make it clearer.

    In Vampire we often joke that you can either play Superhero-With-Fangs or Angst-Drama. If two guys both run a Vampire game they will share the same system (crunch), the same world of darkness (fluff), but they can wildly diverge in terms of what they envision for the PCs to do (rut).

    Other example, D&D 3.x is a game about dungeoncrawling and killing monsters Yet it had rules for basketweaving, playing the violin, and other seemingly superfluous things. Along came 4e, a game about... dungeoncrawling and killing monsters. While the fluff was largely the same (an implied setting without anything really substantial) and the rut was identical, the crunch was not only different but also focused purely on the expected rut. Gone are arts and crafts, cooking, and dancing. You get new rules, but they'll only cover the adventuring. (Much wailing and gnashing of teeth.)

  • ElbasunuElbasunu Registered User regular
    Good read, thanks.

    As for what to do in the WoD campaign, why not add a little shadowrun or D&D to the old formula. Maybe the Immortals need something from places that only mortals can go? Big big prizes await their success. So you get kind of a dungeon crawl/ heist rut.

    g1xfUKU.png?10zfegkyoor3b.png
    Steam ID: Obos Vent: Obos
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...
    Read Hachface's link:
    http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?433358-Crunch-fluff-and-the-other-thing

    But in short, it's "Here's a path for how you are going to play each session." Also "What do the PCs actually DO?"

    For example, in Shadowrun, it's pretty obvious... you are Shadowrunners who go on Shadowruns, which are illegal missions done on the behalf of corporations under the guise of plausible deniability and secrecy.

    In Dungeons and Dragons, it's usually "You are a party of adventurers... go forth into the world and kill a bunch of monsters and grab the loot while leveling up."

    Stargate SG-1 "We go through the gate, we get into trouble, we fix the problems, we leave (and let the SGC or Daniel Jackson sort it out later)"

    I don't like the term "rut" either. :-P
    "Rut" is an awful, terrible nonsensical abbreviated pseudo-word.

    Shadowrunners typically don't have day jobs. But some do. That can get interesting sometimes, but unless it's a "you've got work to do, wagemage" campaign those characters can end up getting everything all messed up...assuming your GM is going to do that. Which is probably why everyone was super confused by the value of the SIN "drawbacks." Because it generally isn't a thing GMs do.

    D&D adventurers actually can (and often should) have day jobs because it makes them more interesting characters and encourages role-playing.

    Stargate SG-1 actually talks about what the teams do when they're not "on stage." In short: military life is generally 70% or more tedium. Like cleaning weapons, writing and filing after action reports, etc. Then there's training. You'll do a lot of that. Honestly I'm pretty sure I could run a Stargate game that nobody would actually want to play if I injected enough "verisimilitude" into it.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
    MrVyngaard
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    I wonder why WoD hasn't included aliens. Imagine playing a race that goes from planet to planet taking resources like locusts and you are an advance party. Except Earth isn't like any planet you visited before and humanity is changing you. So you could pretend to be human, help stop the coming invasion, or stick with your mission.

  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    I wonder why WoD hasn't included aliens. Imagine playing a race that goes from planet to planet taking resources like locusts and you are an advance party. Except Earth isn't like any planet you visited before and humanity is changing you. So you could pretend to be human, help stop the coming invasion, or stick with your mission.

    There are a couple of hints of them. Summoners has Grey Aliens (kinda) and I believe one of the books has the alien abduction style MiBs.

  • InkSplatInkSplat 100%ed Bad Rats. Registered User regular
    Ringo wrote: »
    InkSplat wrote: »
    So, I was thinking of running a Android: Netrunner FATE game to learn the system (so, obviously you'd have to be willing to put up with that. :stuck_out_tongue: ) (though, after seeing the new Destiny live action trailer, I'm tempted to run a game in that setting instead, ha.)

    Would anyone be interested in playing a short little adventure in which there will likely be a bit of floundering?

    I would be interested @InkSplat

    @Ringo‌ Would Destiny be good for you? Cause...



    Is getting me all sorts of amped to run something that looks like that. But, since you're the one who responded, if Android is more your setting of choice, that'll just give me more time to work on what to plug in for a Destiny game once i'm more comfortable with the system.

    Origin for Dragon Age: Inquisition Shenanigans: Inksplat776
  • CalicaCalica Registered User regular
    Of the TV examples people are giving me, the only one I've seen was
    Ardent wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    Elbasunu wrote: »
    What is a "rut" in this context? Normally ruts are bad...
    Read Hachface's link:
    http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?433358-Crunch-fluff-and-the-other-thing

    But in short, it's "Here's a path for how you are going to play each session." Also "What do the PCs actually DO?"

    For example, in Shadowrun, it's pretty obvious... you are Shadowrunners who go on Shadowruns, which are illegal missions done on the behalf of corporations under the guise of plausible deniability and secrecy.

    In Dungeons and Dragons, it's usually "You are a party of adventurers... go forth into the world and kill a bunch of monsters and grab the loot while leveling up."

    Stargate SG-1 "We go through the gate, we get into trouble, we fix the problems, we leave (and let the SGC or Daniel Jackson sort it out later)"

    I don't like the term "rut" either. :-P
    "Rut" is an awful, terrible nonsensical abbreviated pseudo-word.

    Shadowrunners typically don't have day jobs. But some do. That can get interesting sometimes, but unless it's a "you've got work to do, wagemage" campaign those characters can end up getting everything all messed up...assuming your GM is going to do that. Which is probably why everyone was super confused by the value of the SIN "drawbacks." Because it generally isn't a thing GMs do.

    D&D adventurers actually can (and often should) have day jobs because it makes them more interesting characters and encourages role-playing.

    Stargate SG-1 actually talks about what the teams do when they're not "on stage." In short: military life is generally 70% or more tedium. Like cleaning weapons, writing and filing after action reports, etc. Then there's training. You'll do a lot of that. Honestly I'm pretty sure I could run a Stargate game that nobody would actually want to play if I injected enough "verisimilitude" into it.

    It's a real word, and it's the one the post used, so I borrowed it for clarity. But the question was, "What do you actually DO when you play this game?" not, "What do the characters do when they're not onstage/adventuring?" So I'm not sure what point you were trying to make.

    Jedoc wrote: »
    The GOP cares about babies until they're born, soldiers until they're in need of care, and families until they interfere with stockholder dividends.
    Elvenshae
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    I think he conflated my post with another post where someone mentioned this quote:
    that post wrote:
    So what is rut?

    It's the mode of play. It's what PCs actually do for their living. I'll name a few examples to make it clearer.

    In Vampire we often joke that you can either play Superhero-With-Fangs or Angst-Drama. If two guys both run a Vampire game they will share the same system (crunch), the same world of darkness (fluff), but they can wildly diverge in terms of what they envision for the PCs to do (rut).

    Other example, D&D 3.x is a game about dungeoncrawling and killing monsters Yet it had rules for basketweaving, playing the violin, and other seemingly superfluous things. Along came 4e, a game about... dungeoncrawling and killing monsters. While the fluff was largely the same (an implied setting without anything really substantial) and the rut was identical, the crunch was not only different but also focused purely on the expected rut. Gone are arts and crafts, cooking, and dancing. You get new rules, but they'll only cover the adventuring. (Much wailing and gnashing of teeth.)

    The bolded part seems like a point of confusion. The way they are using the term "rut" is NOT what the PCs do for their living. It's the way you are going to play each session as the PCs when you sit down the play the game.

    Again, I don't like the term, really.

    Di87pOF.jpg
    PSN: Hahnsoo | MH Rise: Hahnsoo, Switch FC: SW-0085-2679-5212
  • RingoRingo He/Him Bury me at Lone Tree DenRegistered User regular
    @InkSplat I'd prefer Android: Netrunner personally

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    Calica wrote: »
    It's a real word, and it's the one the post used, so I borrowed it for clarity. But the question was, "What do you actually DO when you play this game?" not, "What do the characters do when they're not onstage/adventuring?" So I'm not sure what point you were trying to make.
    That's a modus operandi or MO if you need a short pseudo-word.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    Thomamelas wrote: »
    I wonder why WoD hasn't included aliens. Imagine playing a race that goes from planet to planet taking resources like locusts and you are an advance party. Except Earth isn't like any planet you visited before and humanity is changing you. So you could pretend to be human, help stop the coming invasion, or stick with your mission.

    There are a couple of hints of them. Summoners has Grey Aliens (kinda) and I believe one of the books has the alien abduction style MiBs.
    Aliens exist in oWoD. They're just hidden among the other monster types.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • WearingglassesWearingglasses Of the friendly neighborhood variety Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    I think he conflated my post with another post where someone mentioned this quote:
    that post wrote:
    So what is rut?

    It's the mode of play. It's what PCs actually do for their living. I'll name a few examples to make it clearer.

    In Vampire we often joke that you can either play Superhero-With-Fangs or Angst-Drama. If two guys both run a Vampire game they will share the same system (crunch), the same world of darkness (fluff), but they can wildly diverge in terms of what they envision for the PCs to do (rut).

    Other example, D&D 3.x is a game about dungeoncrawling and killing monsters Yet it had rules for basketweaving, playing the violin, and other seemingly superfluous things. Along came 4e, a game about... dungeoncrawling and killing monsters. While the fluff was largely the same (an implied setting without anything really substantial) and the rut was identical, the crunch was not only different but also focused purely on the expected rut. Gone are arts and crafts, cooking, and dancing. You get new rules, but they'll only cover the adventuring. (Much wailing and gnashing of teeth.)

    The bolded part seems like a point of confusion. The way they are using the term "rut" is NOT what the PCs do for their living. It's the way you are going to play each session as the PCs when you sit down the play the game.

    Again, I don't like the term, really.

    We could call them boondoggles.

    i-wGBLPCx-1050x10000.jpg

    Or... maybe not.

  • InkSplatInkSplat 100%ed Bad Rats. Registered User regular
    For anyone who either wants to play, or give me any suggestions on the chargen I've laid out, feel free to check out the [pbp] Android: FATE of the Net thread I tossed up earlier.

    Origin for Dragon Age: Inquisition Shenanigans: Inksplat776
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    Since we've actually been discussing this because we hit a major milestone...

    Creating GOOD Aspects for FATE

    This is sort of a condensing of the lessons experienced FATE players utilize when jotting down Aspects. Personally I'm also fond of providing some example compels and invokes so the GM knows where it should be applicable. For example:
    Seeker of the lost
    The first real nudge that sent Jax spiraling out of Imperial orbit were rumors of a lost starship that could dredge new Canals and he’s still looking for other relics and artifacts of the past glories of the Stellar Empire. Of course, he has little use for most of them once acquired, as he is perhaps the least materialistic person most people will ever meet. Invoke to recall details of a lost treasure, locate something hidden, or navigate to an object of interest. Compel to force Jax to turn over a relic, let someone else “win” a prize, or get Jax lost.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
    ElvenshaeDex Dynamo
  • TalonrazorTalonrazor Registered User regular
    I know @InkSplat‌ mentioned it but Destiny is seriously getting me jonesing for some more Novo Aether FATE.... I just need to not run a bunch of games and start a new job at the same time.

    sig4.jpg
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    edited September 2014
    Talonrazor wrote: »
    I know @InkSplat‌ mentioned it but Destiny is seriously getting me jonesing for some more Novo Aether FATE.... I just need to not run a bunch of games and start a new job at the same time.
    Why not both?

    Side note: welcome back, man.

    Ardent on
    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
  • TalonrazorTalonrazor Registered User regular
    Thanks! I missed this place. I am very tempted to try and get Aftermath back up and running. No idea how many of the original people are still around though.

    sig4.jpg
  • EttinEttin Registered User regular
    Ardent wrote: »
    Personally I'm also fond of providing some example compels and invokes so the GM knows where it should be applicable.

    I get my players to do this, it's fantastic. It can also help you dodge a bullet if it turns out you can't think of anything it would do that another aspect doesn't.

    Dex Dynamo
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    Ettin wrote: »
    Ardent wrote: »
    Personally I'm also fond of providing some example compels and invokes so the GM knows where it should be applicable.

    I get my players to do this, it's fantastic. It can also help you dodge a bullet if it turns out you can't think of anything it would do that another aspect doesn't.
    Yeah, we constantly find ourselves forgetting that we can be compelled. The invoke helps when scoping the aspect. Does it make sense for him to be able to use the aspect to help pick an ancient mechanical lock? Yeah, that's pretty much what it's for. Does it mean he can use it to hack a malfunctioning electronic lock to his quarters that's on the fritz? Nope. That's not really aspect-related.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    Missing compels is the hardest thing I found about running Fate.

    There's a ton of character material that the gamemaster has to keep track of constantly.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
    Elvenshae
  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    Missing compels is the hardest thing I found about running Fate.

    There's a ton of character material that the gamemaster has to keep track of constantly.
    This is, amusingly, one of the primary topics of the weekend over on the G+ community. There's a variety of responses on ways to handle this.

    Cheatsheets is the common one. It's interesting because old school cheatsheets included a bunch of stuff you wanted to know in general like falling damage and such, where now you want a cheatsheet for specifics: a handful of aspects likely to come up frequently for each character, some notes on their unique stunts, etc.

    Ironic that we've sort of inverted the old standards.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
    Dex Dynamo
  • ThomamelasThomamelas Only one man can kill this many Russians. Bring his guitar to me! Registered User regular
    I use cheat sheets for everything. Hell I use a cheat sheet when running Leverage.

  • TalonrazorTalonrazor Registered User regular
    FATE has quickly become my go-to system after backing FATE Core. I usually run with a list of character aspects before each scenario and it helps a lot.

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  • ArdentArdent Down UpsideRegistered User regular
    Talonrazor wrote: »
    FATE has quickly become my go-to system after backing FATE Core. I usually run with a list of character aspects before each scenario and it helps a lot.
    The FATE-using community is significantly larger now than it was even three years ago, so I only get blank looks half as often when I put FATE forward.

    Steam ID | Origin ID: ArdentX | Uplay ID: theardent | Battle.net: Ardent#11476
  • WearingglassesWearingglasses Of the friendly neighborhood variety Registered User regular
    What, in your opinion, are the elements of a really good boss battle?

    - Not just a bullet/swordhack/damage sponge
    - Not anticlimactic
    - Any surprises should not make the PC feel like the boss pulled it out of its ass
    - ???

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