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[Roleplaying Games] Play Everything, Only GM the Games You Want To

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  • Al BaronAl Baron Registered User regular
    The beta for Age of the Rebellion is hitting soon.

    Seems like Duty is this book's Obligation.

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    Ringo
  • ElldrenElldren Is a woman dammit ceterum censeoRegistered User regular
    Well 13th Age is getting buzz right now because the first wave of books are hitting backers/early adopters.

    true

    but I have pdfs of all three right now

    fuck gendered marketing
  • SteelhawkSteelhawk Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    I was involved with both of the stalled attempts at getting an IKRPG game going here. I would love it if someone were to try and fire one up again. I'm itching to play more than just a taste of the game.

    Maybe I'll even bust my PBP GM'ing cherry and run one here.

    Steelhawk on
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    I had a fellow player throw out the possibility of playing Iron Kingdoms at one point, but we went with Fate instead. I enjoyed my 3e excursion into that setting.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    Star Wars: Age of Rebellion was just announced.

    It's version of the roleplaying mechanic is Duty, as opposed to Obligation in EotE. I am intrigued already, as that's a mechanic that was tried in Saga edition.. sorta..

    He/Him
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Elldren wrote: »
    Well 13th Age is getting buzz right now because the first wave of books are hitting backers/early adopters.

    true

    but I have pdfs of all three right now

    While true, I've had pdfs of 13th age for like six months...but now the book has hit is when I'm gearing up to play.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • ElldrenElldren Is a woman dammit ceterum censeoRegistered User regular
    Elldren wrote: »
    Well 13th Age is getting buzz right now because the first wave of books are hitting backers/early adopters.

    true

    but I have pdfs of all three right now

    While true, I've had pdfs of 13th age for like six months...but now the book has hit is when I'm gearing up to play.

    I spose its because I only play games on the interwebs

    incidentally having to open up a physical book every time i need to look something up (which I do for Burning Wheel and Mage: the Awakening)

    is so

    so

    annoying

    fuck gendered marketing
  • jdarksunjdarksun Struggler Registered User regular
    Al Baron wrote: »
    The beta for Age of the Rebellion is hitting soon.

    Seems like Duty is this book's Obligation.
    I want this nooowww! Gotta get my old SIlver Squadron game going again.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    Given that I'll be paying them for the final project, I am unlikely to pay them for the privilege to playtest for them.

    But I do eagerly await the final product. I just really hope it's not on the Dark Heresy - Rogue Trader model.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    I'm hoping it's same power-level, just a different focus.

    usnTyq4.jpg
    Gamertag: PrimusD | Rock Band DLC | GW:OttW - arrcd | WLD - Thortar
    Utsanomiko
  • UtsanomikoUtsanomiko Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    I have double-posted. but I will say I agree with the posted above and below.

    Utsanomiko on
    hmm.gif
  • UtsanomikoUtsanomiko Registered User regular
    Going by the text posted, looks like the Duty mechanic in Star Wars: AoR starts at 0 value and builds up as goals are achieved, which makes it seem like it could be used to measure access to military resources and assets without depending upon a strict rank system across all careers.

    Speaking of careers, one photo is labeled as Soldier career, which shouldn't be surprising.

    Droids and Bothans return (and Humans undoubtedly), which the included page showing Duros and Gran. Going by the available individual character illustrations, we also appear to have Ithorians, Sullustans, and Mon Calamari; eight total, just like EotE's species count.

    I say this as not a big fan of playing Rebels or Civil War-themed Star Wars adventures: I am going to get this and I am super-excited to beta test it.

    hmm.gif
  • AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    After how much I enjoyed the EotE beta... I'm.. considering it. I'd prefer to have a PDF and a promise at a future discount, but... well, like I said. We'll see how much things balloon, and how much is rendered redundant between the two books. But who knows, maybe FFG won't cripple my wall-- oh, who am I kidding.

    He/Him
  • VanguardVanguard A wretched country of duskRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Mikey CTS wrote: »
    I can understand why people are so excited about 13th Age. Having read some of the rules it is definitely the spiritual successor to D&D4e, which is the favored system of this board. It's even more gamist than 4e, having a lot of risk/reward style mechanics. I think that's a good thing. I feel like this hobby sometimes has focused too much on the roleplaying and too little on the game aspect. By that I mean they've focused too much on simulation because it is supposed to increase immersion. I think that's bs, but to each their own. What I mean is it is a game, so the rules that govern it should be fun to play with. Give players some real decisions with their powers/abilities rather just picking the best one for the current situation. I also like some of the story gaming elements they've added, like the Icons and One Unique Thing.

    One of my problem pa with the system is actually the inclusion of story game elements. Not because they're there, but they seem tacked on. The explanation of failing forward is particularly poorly integrated.

  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Athenor wrote: »
    After how much I enjoyed the EotE beta... I'm.. considering it. I'd prefer to have a PDF and a promise at a future discount, but... well, like I said. We'll see how much things balloon, and how much is rendered redundant between the two books. But who knows, maybe FFG won't cripple my wall-- oh, who am I kidding.

    No PDFs is probably part of the deal to get the Star Wars license.

    usnTyq4.jpg
    Gamertag: PrimusD | Rock Band DLC | GW:OttW - arrcd | WLD - Thortar
  • bssbss Brostoyevsky Madison, WIRegistered User regular
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    3DS: 2466-2307-8384 PSN: bssteph Steam: bsstephan Twitch: bsstephan
    Tabletop:13th Age (mm-mmm), D&D 4e
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  • PMAversPMAvers Registered User regular
    Guessing they'll have the Age of Rebellion books at GenCon like they did with EotE last year.

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    COME FORTH, AMATERASU! - Switch Friend Code SW-5465-2458-5696 - Twitch
    jdarksun
  • AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    edited August 2013
    PMAvers wrote: »
    Guessing they'll have the Age of Rebellion books at GenCon like they did with EotE last year.

    Pretty safe bet. So that means it'll take 3 years to get all the books out. I wonder how fast the supplement system will be? I mean, we've already got the first crunch add-on for EotE, in the form of a career book. So there's probably 4 more of those. Vehicle/toy stuff can be packed in those...

    I dunno. I always found it kinda cool that I was able to "complete" Saga edition (though not by WotC's choice, I'm sure). I'd like to do the same with FFG's game, as it seems a hell of a lot more fun.

    Edit: I wonder how much my complete Saga edition would fetch me...

    Athenor on
    He/Him
  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Athenor wrote: »
    I wonder how much my complete Saga edition would fetch me...

    I know some individual volumes can fetch over $80.

    usnTyq4.jpg
    Gamertag: PrimusD | Rock Band DLC | GW:OttW - arrcd | WLD - Thortar
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    KotOR is worth a mint. The rest I don't know.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. Now With Ninjas!

    They tried to bury us. They didn't know that we were seeds. 2018 Midterms. Get your shit together.
  • Edith UpwardsEdith Upwards Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    Deadlands Reloaded
    DL.png

    The year is 1879, but the history is not our own. The guns of the Civil War are silent in a tense cease-fire. California is shattered by the Great Quake Quake of ’68, a superfuel called ghost rock revealed in the new channels and cliff faces. Powerful Rail Barons strive to complete a transcontinental railroad, and the Great Rail Wars exact a bloody toll in the Union, the Confederacy, the Sioux Nation, the Mormon state of Deseret, and the Independent Commonwealth of California.

    The Tombstone Epitaph has always been filled with lurid tales of daring desperadoes and deadly drifters, but lately the West’s most-read tabloid claims there’s something more sinister stalking the fronteir’s lonely plains: monsters! Fortunately, where there are monsters, there are heroes. Squint-eyed gunfighters, card-chucking hexsligners, savage braves, and righteous padres have all answered the call. And if they fight hard enough, they might just discover the identity of the mysterious Reckoners some say are behind it all.

    Deadlands Noir
    DLN_sans_noir.png

    New Orleans, 1935. Whoever called this “the Big Easy” sure got that one wrong. Things are tough all over. Honest work is hard to find, and even dishonest jobs are getting scarce. The one thing that’s not in short supply is trouble. From shady thugs to crooked cops to Mafia soldiers, there’s plenty of characters out there looking to give an honest Joe a hard time.

    And that’s not the worst of it.

    There are stories going round about things that go bump in the night. Things you wouldn’t want to meet in a dark alley on a darker night. And those stories aren’t just coming from rummies or saps who read that Epitaph rag.

    Still, there are a few heroes left in the concrete jungle. Steely-eyed private dicks, fast-talking grifters, wild-eyed inventors, and shadowy houngans still struggle against the encroaching darkness. With enough moxie—and more than a little luck—they might just be enough to turn the tide.

    Hell On Earth Reloaded
    HOE.png
    There came a Reckoning...

    The year is 2094, but the future is not our own. For over 200 years, a Cold War was waged between the United and Confederate States of America. The American Civil War ended in a stalemate in the late 1800s, leaving the South a free and independent nation. A long, tense peace was punctuated by brief spasms of violence and briefer moments of cooperation for a greater good.

    The long Cold War came to an end on September 23, 2081, at 6:17 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Judgment Day arrived on the wings of irradiated ghost rock bombs, leaving about six billion dead. Of the four billion or so who survived, most fell victim to starvation, disease, random violence, and worse in the chaotic days following the end of the world. Desperate Gunfighters prowl the irradiated High Plains alongside Doomsayers, Ravenites, and Toxic Shamans.

    But all is not lost. Now that the Reckoners have taken mortal form, some whisper they might be destroyed permanently.

    Edith Upwards on
    MrVyngaard
  • ShadowenShadowen Snores in the morning Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Athenor wrote: »
    I wonder how much my complete Saga edition would fetch me...

    I know some individual volumes can fetch over $80.
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    KotOR is worth a mint. The rest I don't know.

    ...it's too bad that Saga Edition is the only system I've ever had a complete set of. $80 a book is tempting, but not enough to get me to break up the band.

    Shadowen on
  • Chomp-ChompChomp-Chomp Shonen Princess Registered User regular
    Totally late on my OP kudos, but still:

    Hell yes Lady Blackbird


    Also, I apparently need to get The 13th Age now.

    I know what "One Unique Things" are about, but can somebody explain Icons?

  • AthenorAthenor Battle Hardened Optimist The Skies of HiigaraRegistered User regular
    Yeah... I'd actually wash on KoToR, as I got it for $75 - my LGS is more about making money than being stand up for his customers, which is his right. So unless I could sell it for more than that, it's not worth that much to sell.

    I hear Starships of the Galaxy might be rare too. I think Threats is too, but no one cares about a monster manual.

    He/Him
  • VanguardVanguard A wretched country of duskRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited August 2013
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    Can't comment on the icons as I didn't spend much time with them.

    Vanguard on
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    Vanguard wrote: »
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    Can't comment on the icons as I didn't spend much time with them.

    I thought it was a classy way to acknowledge that it's not their original idea, and I don't think there's much to explain. Although the rules generally assume you're familiar with RPGs - they don't hold your hand.

    As for the Icons, they're huge, iconic personalities, such as The Emperor or The Orc Lord. You choose connections (good, bad, or conflicted) to a few of them in character creation, and then roll at the start of the session to see if they'll be a part of the session, and at other times. There is a lot more to the rules, but that's the basics. A connection to some of the movers and shakers of the world.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • bssbss Brostoyevsky Madison, WIRegistered User regular
    Vanguard wrote: »
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    I think I can agree with that. My only material complaint about the book is that it often feels like you need to consume the entire thing to really get the vision, and I think failing forward is one of the ideas they pitch by little examples and thematic nods throughout. (Ultimately though I love the writing style in the book, so it all works out.)
    Also, I apparently need to get The 13th Age now.

    I know what "One Unique Things" are about, but can somebody explain Icons?

    Icons are kind of like the NPCs/gods presented in any campaign setting, with a couple distinctions. For starters, they are mortal entities in the setting, with specific goals and intrigues rather than aloof immortal beings. (The gods themselves are left to "worship whatever you make up" by default; you could come up with specific deities if you wish, the game has no real mechanical tie to individual deities or religions.) Their organizations/cultists/etc are the big movers and shakers of the world, and it's from this that the PCs get involved. Icon relationships allow, from 1st level, the players to inject themselves in the events of the world, for roleplaying purposes. You have a couple points to spend with a positive/conflicted/negative hook with specific icon(s) that both convey some backstory and give you storygaming benefit.

    So if my concept involved being a kicker of demon asses and reformed follower of the dark gods, I might start with a conflicted relationship with the Crusader (who is big on both kicking demon asses and worshipping evil deities) --- my concept could be that I led a local chapter of demon hunters and worshipers of Yig, but saw the light and now don't worship the dark gods. I am still known for and enjoy wrecking some demons, but now that we don't see eye-to-eye, some of my former allies or other members of the Crusader's order are just as likely to show me the door (or worse, have it in for me).

    So, they start with being a background hook, but the points in my relationship also come up for story elements in game. There's a kind of gradient of application. If I'm dealing with followers of the Crusader, I'd roll my relationship to see if I can convince them to lend some aid, or get information out of them, or whatever benefited us at the moment. That might not succeed in any tangible way, I might roll well and get my wildest dreams, or it might roll interestingly and I get more or less what I wanted, but with some kind of monkey wrench (because storytelling). That's the fairly expected use of the mechanic. Things get even more storygamey in the start of the session, when everyone rolls all of their relationships and it's a kind of "I wonder who today's story is about" move --- if you roll good results for the Crusader at the start, we are more or less obligated to wrap him into the plot somehow.

    Some classes have additional features based on icons --- the bard is a good example, since they are thematically the premiere magical storytellers, so they have optional features like singing a song to gain extra temporary relationships which tend to mean more opportunities to cause hilariously bad unintended things to happen steer the plot of the session.

    I hope that explains it. Since I just dumped a bunch of words on this thread about the game (again), if people feel the need to split 13th Age off into its own thread, I'll gladly contribute.

    3DS: 2466-2307-8384 PSN: bssteph Steam: bsstephan Twitch: bsstephan
    Tabletop:13th Age (mm-mmm), D&D 4e
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  • LeperLeper Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    To add (a little) to that, Icons are generally mortal(ish) Big Players in the setting.

    They provide a way for players to tie their characters into the setting in a meaningful way, without things getting too out of hand by providing a balancing mechanic for their involvement in the campaign. e.g. "I'm the daughter of X big player and Y big player and Z big player is my god-father while I frequently have afternoon tea with V and W, who normally hate eachother, but really get together because they're both super cool with me, so I get all these favors from all of them all the time, and also this other lady hates me because I'm so perfect but really that jealousy is a cover for infatuation so sometimes she might help me too." Not actually possible (at least from the get-go) under the rules.

    Whether your player ties themselves intimately to one or more of the big noises or not, there's still a concrete limit to how far that tie will go. In keeping with the "crunchy mechanics with some indie stuff," it can help players get invested in the world itself by allowing them some narrative control over parts of the world other games might consider "hands off" or at least "DM territory only."

    Leper on
    If my role play is hindered by rolling to play, then I'd prefer the rolls play right, instead of steam-rolling play-night.
  • VanguardVanguard A wretched country of duskRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    Can't comment on the icons as I didn't spend much time with them.

    I thought it was a classy way to acknowledge that it's not their original idea, and I don't think there's much to explain. Although the rules generally assume you're familiar with RPGs - they don't hold your hand.

    As for the Icons, they're huge, iconic personalities, such as The Emperor or The Orc Lord. You choose connections (good, bad, or conflicted) to a few of them in character creation, and then roll at the start of the session to see if they'll be a part of the session, and at other times. There is a lot more to the rules, but that's the basics. A connection to some of the movers and shakers of the world.

    I think that the concept needs some solid examples to show the difference between static failure (it doesn't happen) and dynamic failure (you do not succeed, which causes x, y, and z to happen). Like, in Burning Wheel, when going over the intent and task system, Luke makes you note the subtleties of the intent, "Pick the lock before the guard comes." Static failure is that you fail the action--you don't pick the lock. But, as he says, if you look at the intent, particularly, "before the guard comes", you can still fail the roll but progress the story in a way that drives a better conflict. In this case, you ice the lock, but the guard arrives and now you're in conflict.

    Elldren
  • VanguardVanguard A wretched country of duskRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    poshniallo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    Can't comment on the icons as I didn't spend much time with them.

    I thought it was a classy way to acknowledge that it's not their original idea, and I don't think there's much to explain. Although the rules generally assume you're familiar with RPGs - they don't hold your hand.

    As for the Icons, they're huge, iconic personalities, such as The Emperor or The Orc Lord. You choose connections (good, bad, or conflicted) to a few of them in character creation, and then roll at the start of the session to see if they'll be a part of the session, and at other times. There is a lot more to the rules, but that's the basics. A connection to some of the movers and shakers of the world.

    I think that the concept needs some solid examples to show the difference between static failure (it doesn't happen) and dynamic failure (you do not succeed, which causes x, y, and z to happen). Like, in Burning Wheel, when going over the intent and task system, Luke makes you note the subtleties of the intent, "Pick the lock before the guard comes." Static failure is that you fail the action--you don't pick the lock. But, as he says, if you look at the intent, particularly, "before the guard comes", you can still fail the roll but progress the story in a way that drives a better conflict. In this case, you ice the lock, but the guard arrives and now you're in conflict.

  • Iron WeaselIron Weasel Dillon! You son of a bitch!Registered User regular
    Steelhawk wrote: »
    I was involved with both of the stalled attempts at getting an IKRPG game going here. I would love it if someone were to try and fire one up again. I'm itching to play more than just a taste of the game.

    Maybe I'll even bust my PBP GM'ing cherry and run one here.
    The IK RPG really sounds like a laser aimed directly at my brain. I know I'll never get to play a RPG game, but I may order the core rulebook just to own it.

    Currently Playing:
    The Division, Warframe (XB1)
    GT: Tanith 6227
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    Vanguard wrote: »
    poshniallo wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    bss wrote: »
    It may come down to being a question of personal preference in the end, but I wouldn't call them tacked on, if you're talking about the icons, at least. A number of the classes have options that mechanically tie in various ways to the icons and icon relationship rolls. The mechanic may feel bolted on because it's not d20, but that is a distinct design decision that they call out --- they wanted to segregate the storygaming relationships from magic items and ability check bonuses and whatnot. The OUT and failing forward are non-mechanical basically by definition, so I don't really know how they could really be integrated in a way other than a pretty common "this is what we think you should do" guideline.

    I read the section and they basically said, "Indie game designers have been using this concept and they're right. You should do it sometimes, too!" I understand its not mechanical, but I think a little more explanation is needed to really implement this concept.

    Can't comment on the icons as I didn't spend much time with them.

    I thought it was a classy way to acknowledge that it's not their original idea, and I don't think there's much to explain. Although the rules generally assume you're familiar with RPGs - they don't hold your hand.

    As for the Icons, they're huge, iconic personalities, such as The Emperor or The Orc Lord. You choose connections (good, bad, or conflicted) to a few of them in character creation, and then roll at the start of the session to see if they'll be a part of the session, and at other times. There is a lot more to the rules, but that's the basics. A connection to some of the movers and shakers of the world.

    I think that the concept needs some solid examples to show the difference between static failure (it doesn't happen) and dynamic failure (you do not succeed, which causes x, y, and z to happen). Like, in Burning Wheel, when going over the intent and task system, Luke makes you note the subtleties of the intent, "Pick the lock before the guard comes." Static failure is that you fail the action--you don't pick the lock. But, as he says, if you look at the intent, particularly, "before the guard comes", you can still fail the roll but progress the story in a way that drives a better conflict. In this case, you ice the lock, but the guard arrives and now you're in conflict.

    The book has plenty of examples, and gives about a page to the idea.

    I think that is a testament to the excellence of the original idea - once you have heard it, it makes sense very quickly. It's amazing to come up with it, but easy to grasp.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • OminousLozengeOminousLozenge Registered User regular
    Steelhawk wrote: »
    I was involved with both of the stalled attempts at getting an IKRPG game going here. I would love it if someone were to try and fire one up again. I'm itching to play more than just a taste of the game.

    Maybe I'll even bust my PBP GM'ing cherry and run one here.
    The IK RPG really sounds like a laser aimed directly at my brain. I know I'll never get to play a RPG game, but I may order the core rulebook just to own it.

    The book is a work of art. I like to open it just to admire the pages.

    Similarly, the Dresden RPG has loads of character. Lots of post-its, highlighters, and markups by characters from the novels. Mostly it's just color commentary, but it's funny and really gives the book life like I wouldn't have expected.

    Let me know if you do pick up IK RPG sometime. I've always wanted to do a game of it.

    Sometimes I have ideas for things.
  • jdarksunjdarksun Struggler Registered User regular
    Hey, if any of you fine folk are going to GenCon this weekend or PAX at the end of the month and are willing to pick up Age of Rebellion for me, I'll gladly pay for it and shipping!

    (assuming FFG doesn't put it up for sale by then)

  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    I am being sorely tempted. I went and looked up flight prices and somehow a package of flight+hotel+rental car is cheaper than just the flight. I'd end up flying at crazy times no doubt.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • mightyspacepopemightyspacepope Registered User regular
    jdarksun wrote: »
    Al Baron wrote: »
    The beta for Age of the Rebellion is hitting soon.

    Seems like Duty is this book's Obligation.
    I want this nooowww! Gotta get my old SIlver Squadron game going again.

    Yes.

    jdarksun
  • jdarksunjdarksun Struggler Registered User regular
    jdarksun wrote: »
    Al Baron wrote: »
    The beta for Age of the Rebellion is hitting soon.

    Seems like Duty is this book's Obligation.
    I want this nooowww! Gotta get my old SIlver Squadron game going again.
    Yes.
    And I can use roll20 instead of futzing around with a million layers in gimp! So excited!

  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    I just noticed that I have 19 systems on pdf and 3 in paper and the only game I've involved in is Marvel Heroic. I wish my working hours were more stable so I could put together a gaming group, either in RL or through Roll20.

    webguy20
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    I've got way too many systems right now and not nearly enough game time to play them all. It saddens me. My buddies and I are going to play some blood bowl this fall though, and that should be fun. The two new guys have been part of a league for a few years and they are looking for new blood. Should be fun.

    Would playing the video game version help me play the table top version?

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    tzeentchling
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    I've got way too many systems right now and not nearly enough game time to play them all. It saddens me. My buddies and I are going to play some blood bowl this fall though, and that should be fun. The two new guys have been part of a league for a few years and they are looking for new blood. Should be fun.

    Would playing the video game version help me play the table top version?

    Haven't played the tabletop but the video game version sure as hell felt like they just automated a table top system and through fancy graphics on top.

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
    Auralynx
This discussion has been closed.