Species ALRE - A Realistic Emergent Evolution Game (PC, Windows only for now)

TubeTube Administrator, ClubPA admin
Hello all. I'm Quasar, lead developer and coder, and I'd like to introduce you to

Species: Artificial Life, Real Evolution.

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Formal Description: Species ALRE is a scientifically-founded artificial life game wrapped around a complex, first-principles simulation of evolution by natural selection.

Non-formal Description: Species aims to be approximately what you'd get if you genespliced Dwarf Fortress and Spore, the resulting abomination was carried to maturity by Yog Sothoth, and David Attenborough and GLaDOS co-narrated the birth.



It's currently only on it's third public alpha release (0.6.0, available for free download from the site), so the much of the graphics, AI and physics are still placeholder, and it can be unstable over the course of extended play (crashes somewhat mitigated by frequent autosaves).

The fundamental game mechanics are working, however: the in-game creatures are actually living entities by some definitions of life. Based on the random mutation and emergent selection pressures, expect to see speciation, punctuated equilibrium, convergent evolution and all that other wonderful ultrasciency nerdy stuff. (And if that bores you, there are also drivable rovers with ridiculous physics, climate controls and oh just watch the video)

Oh, and the randomly generated creatures tend to straddle the line between nightmarishly horrific and hilariously absurd, so there's that too.

Cheers!
Qu

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Posts

  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Loved the hideous space wormcow things. Great demonstration video.

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  • bamjobamjo Registered User regular
    This is so awesome! I am downloading the alpha right now.

    In case the dev is reading this: The video showed a pretty diverse ecology developing. I saw that you can vary the climate globally, but do local environmental factors affect speciation? In worlds that have been running for a while, do you see species variation develop according to biome?

  • QuQuasarQuQuasar Overlord Brisbane, AustraliaRegistered User new member
    bamjo wrote: »
    This is so awesome! I am downloading the alpha right now.

    In case the dev is reading this: The video showed a pretty diverse ecology developing. I saw that you can vary the climate globally, but do local environmental factors affect speciation? In worlds that have been running for a while, do you see species variation develop according to biome?

    Yep. :)

    Of course, since it's a first-principles simulator, all of these things are emergent from the simpler mechanics of evolution, so it can be hard to identify when they're occuring, especially with the tiny biome sizes.

    The best way to see it is to generate a lake or ocean with two distinct, seperate islands. Genetic drift then occurs and you usually end up with two very different lineages on each island, providing you can keep both of them alive and they don't develop enough speed to swim the gap.

  • BloodySlothBloodySloth Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    This is SUPER NEAT. In my first world, my arctic forest type biome now features these relatively familiar looking, stocky giraffe creatures that have evolved over time from slugs without any interference from me. My northern island is a big jungle biome that is periodically completely stripped of all plant life, and then all the animals try to forge the ocean to the southern island. Most of those that make it freeze to death, but there's occasionally a few survivors that branch off into a new species.

    EDIT: Aaaaannnd of course my awesome giraffe monsters go extinct as soon as I post. At least my jungle island still has these neat, kind of dinosaur-looking things that walk on clawed forelimbs.

    EDIT 2: Something about the environment of my south island seems to encourage long necks. A group of lucky giant headed lizard things that managed to acclimate to the cold of the south island during one of my mass migrations has started spreading out over a now empty frozen wasteland, growing long, pencil thin necks in the process.

    BloodySloth on
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