Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

[Xbox One] Come On, Jump in! Over One Million Served! Gamertag List in OP

19596979899101»

Posts

  • tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited January 2014
    Darkewolfe wrote: »
    Maximum wrote: »
    I will be the umpteenth person to chime in on the XBone's Netflix.

    For me, the video quality is garbage. I immediately switch over to my PS4, watch the same exact show and it's perfect.

    ....But if I rent a movie on the PSN the video quality is garbage, but then later I rent a movie through the XBox store and it's perfect.

    So, to summarize: I have no goddamn clue.

    The shadowy elephant in the room is likely your ISPs.

    Is netflix pulling from different servers based on which platform its delivering content to? That's the only way that would make sense. Otherwise it's the exact same data being served up to the boxes from the same place, so the ISP wouldn't make sense... Would it?


    *tinfoil hat*net neutrality*/tinfoil hat*

    But really, at a certain point deep inside netflix there might be a shared pool of resources that the content comes from, but somewhere along the line it's likely that there's servers devoted to the Xbox One and servers devoted to the Playstation 4 platform feeding that data out. Even Xbox 360 netflix and Xbox One netflix are both their own services, and one can fail while the other is fine. With that in mind, it's somewhat possible that the ones for serving TV streaming on the Xbox One are throttled or choked, while the ones for serving movies aren't on the Xbox One and vice versa.

    edit: I say this because streaming from my Xbox 360 is garbage, but it's actually great on my Xbox One.

    edit2: also, yeah. I don't know for certain either.

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited January 2014
    I know this sounds silly... but do yourself a favor and try using Google's DNS servers on your console.

    Edit the DHCP settings on the console, give your xbox a static IP (which you open all relevant ports to for NAT), and make the 1st DNS server 8.8.8.8 with your router being the second one.

    You will be surprised how much better lots of stuff runs as a result.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited January 2014
    You're going to have to help me out on that one. Why would that help if the issue here has more to do with an already established and ongoing connection? /boggle

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    At some point, I should try Netflix on my PS3 and see if it's suffering from awkward performance.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    You're going to have to help me out on that one. Why would that help if the issue here has more to do with an already established and ongoing connection? /boggle
    the conspiracy theorist in me wants to think that ISPs are purposefully moving your request to netflix / hulu / etc through a middleman that uses QoS to diminish bandwidth priority.

    All I know is... with both AppleTV and Xbox 360, switching to 8s worked every time.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • AllforceAllforce Registered User regular
    edited January 2014
    Aren't Apple and Microsoft the only two companies requiring Netflix to change their interface to fit their devices? I read Netflix has unified their interface across pretty much all devices at this point), but Microsoft and Apple require Netflix to design their app to fit in with their interfaces.

    Not sure if that makes a difference in quality but it could be a reason if those two are the only outliers.

    Allforce on
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    Allforce wrote: »
    Aren't Apple and Microsoft the only two companies requiring Netflix to change their interface to fit their devices? I read Netflix has unified their interface across pretty much all devices at this point), but Microsoft and Apple require Netflix to design their app to fit in with their interfaces.

    Not sure if that makes a difference in quality but it could be a reason if those two are the only outliers.

    Nah, because it impacted my PS3 back in the day too.

    It is really your ISP, and them taking steps behind the scenes to prioritize bandwidth. It's not even that they are out to screw netflix over or anything, just that they perceive Netflix's swallowing of thier bandwidth as a threat to QoS for everyone else.

    DNS 8.8.8.8 is run completely open and free, and avoids any tampering by your ISP, or even the government (Google has openly said they will not drop sites off of their DNS just because the US Government tells them to).

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
    Synthesis
  • BadwrongBadwrong TokyoRegistered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    You're going to have to help me out on that one. Why would that help if the issue here has more to do with an already established and ongoing connection? /boggle
    the conspiracy theorist in me wants to think that ISPs are purposefully moving your request to netflix / hulu / etc through a middleman that uses QoS to diminish bandwidth priority.

    All I know is... with both AppleTV and Xbox 360, switching to 8s worked every time.

    But setting to googles DNS is only going to effect.... DNS. Its not like you proxy your stream through whatever DNS server you are using.

    I'm not denying it doesn't work, it just makes zero sense. Once my computer/device asks the DNS server what IP to goto for penny-arcade.com, the actual content does not pass through the DNS server at all.

    If an ISP is doing some QoS shit, then the fix would be to encapsulate the traffic via VPN so they don't know what it is and can't fuck with it. I have fios and there are sometimes downloads that I see going only 50k, I put them through a VPN and then magically get 3-5 megs instead. Clearly my ISP having some sorta restriction there.

    Also for DNS, my PS4 is using whatever DNS that my ISP is assigning to me. And my PS4 streams fantastically on netflix, full HD and never buffers more than a second at the start. Try the exact same thing through my Xbone and its going to use the same DNS that the PS4 was, but the quality is night and day. So if there was something wrong on my ISPs DNS server, it would cause the PS4 streaming to suck just as much.

    Steam: Badwrong || Xbox: Duncan Dohnuts || PSN: Buc_wild

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Local H JayLocal H Jay Registered User regular
    new thread title should be "Xbox One: A 13 GB patch is required to post"

    XB1/360 - Local H Jay
    PS4 - Local_H_Jay
    Sub me on Youtube
    And Twitch
    socksProhassWraith260
  • AllforceAllforce Registered User regular
    Yeah it makes no sense that its his ISP if he can just switch to another device and its perfectly fine. If Microsoft and Apple are requiring Netflix to design a custom build and interface for the app, you realistically have to start looking at the problem from there. Everything else now (PS3, PS4, Smart TVs, blu-ray players, Roku, WDTV,etc) uses that standard Netflix interface and it works great.

    http://www.theverge.com/2013/11/13/5098224/netflix-introduces-one-unified-tv-interface-to-rule-them-all
    Of course, Netflix works with partners, so not every device is going to be running the new interface. The Apple TV will keep its current look and feature set, and the Xbox One will be running its own Metro-inspired app (Wii and Wii U owners are also left out in the cold). It’s going to present an interesting conundrum for some users; I’ve personally preferred the straightforward functionality of the Apple TV Netflix app for some time, but over the past week I’ve found the new Netflix to be more helpful when it comes to casual viewing

    You also hear WiiU owners complaining about Netflix performance, it HAS to be something to do with this. Hell Google auto fills "XBox One Netflix quality bad" before you finish typing "Netflix" in the sentence. Something else is going on besides "your ISP is doing it"

  • ProhassProhass Registered User regular
    Xbox one: posts are capped at 30fps

    Local H Jay
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited January 2014
    Badwrong wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    You're going to have to help me out on that one. Why would that help if the issue here has more to do with an already established and ongoing connection? /boggle
    the conspiracy theorist in me wants to think that ISPs are purposefully moving your request to netflix / hulu / etc through a middleman that uses QoS to diminish bandwidth priority.

    All I know is... with both AppleTV and Xbox 360, switching to 8s worked every time.

    But setting to googles DNS is only going to effect.... DNS. Its not like you proxy your stream through whatever DNS server you are using.

    I'm not denying it doesn't work, it just makes zero sense. Once my computer/device asks the DNS server what IP to goto for penny-arcade.com, the actual content does not pass through the DNS server at all.

    If an ISP is doing some QoS shit, then the fix would be to encapsulate the traffic via VPN so they don't know what it is and can't fuck with it. I have fios and there are sometimes downloads that I see going only 50k, I put them through a VPN and then magically get 3-5 megs instead. Clearly my ISP having some sorta restriction there.

    Also for DNS, my PS4 is using whatever DNS that my ISP is assigning to me. And my PS4 streams fantastically on netflix, full HD and never buffers more than a second at the start. Try the exact same thing through my Xbone and its going to use the same DNS that the PS4 was, but the quality is night and day. So if there was something wrong on my ISPs DNS server, it would cause the PS4 streaming to suck just as much.

    unless the PS4 is requesting a different server than the one your xbox one is.


    Here... think of it like this.

    streamexample.xbo.netflix.com resolves to 1.2.3.4

    streamexample.ps4.netflex.com resolves to 1.2.3.5

    Your ISP propagates their own custom DNS which their DHCP server will default you to that points:

    streamexample.xbo.netflix.com resolves to 5.4.3.2

    5.4.3.2 is run by them, and points you and all your requests to netflix's 1.2.3.4 server, only that it only allows for a 2Mb/s connection through the hop.

    And the PS4 one? maybe they haven't gotten to it yet. With Hulu Plus, you used to watch it on the PS3 web browser until the services realized and patched it off. These consoles are still new, and it is possible Microsoft is using the same path as the 360, hence why it sucks from the start.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    Badwrong wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    You're going to have to help me out on that one. Why would that help if the issue here has more to do with an already established and ongoing connection? /boggle
    the conspiracy theorist in me wants to think that ISPs are purposefully moving your request to netflix / hulu / etc through a middleman that uses QoS to diminish bandwidth priority.

    All I know is... with both AppleTV and Xbox 360, switching to 8s worked every time.

    But setting to googles DNS is only going to effect.... DNS. Its not like you proxy your stream through whatever DNS server you are using.

    I'm not denying it doesn't work, it just makes zero sense. Once my computer/device asks the DNS server what IP to goto for penny-arcade.com, the actual content does not pass through the DNS server at all.

    If an ISP is doing some QoS shit, then the fix would be to encapsulate the traffic via VPN so they don't know what it is and can't fuck with it. I have fios and there are sometimes downloads that I see going only 50k, I put them through a VPN and then magically get 3-5 megs instead. Clearly my ISP having some sorta restriction there.

    Also for DNS, my PS4 is using whatever DNS that my ISP is assigning to me. And my PS4 streams fantastically on netflix, full HD and never buffers more than a second at the start. Try the exact same thing through my Xbone and its going to use the same DNS that the PS4 was, but the quality is night and day. So if there was something wrong on my ISPs DNS server, it would cause the PS4 streaming to suck just as much.

    unless the PS4 is requesting a different server than the one your xbox one is.


    Here... think of it like this.

    streamexample.xbo.netflix.com resolves to 1.2.3.4

    streamexample.ps4.netflex.com resolves to 1.2.3.5

    Your ISP propagates their own custom DNS which their DHCP server will default you to that points:

    streamexample.xbo.netflix.com resolves to 5.4.3.2

    5.4.3.2 is run by them, and points you and all your requests to netflix's 1.2.3.4 server, only that it only allows for a 2Mb/s connection through the hop.

    And the PS4 one? maybe they haven't gotten to it yet. With Hulu Plus, you used to watch it on the PS3 web browser until the services realized and patched it off. These consoles are still new, and it is possible Microsoft is using the same path as the 360, hence why it sucks from the start.

    Yeah, I think they do use different servers for each platform. Which... is still why I don't understand why changing the DNS you're going through would fix the issue. :P

    Maybe it will work? MAYBE YOU ARE JUST REALLY CRAZY? Who knows.

    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
  • 8bitogre8bitogre San Antonio, TXRegistered User regular
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • 8bitogre8bitogre San Antonio, TXRegistered User regular
    edited January 2014
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    8bitogre on
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    A static path TO AN IP ADDRESS. Please read the explanation I posted above.

    This feels like we are drifting away from XBO here... but if you have ever edited your hostfile to point to a different IP, then you know how this works.

    All the ISP has to do is set up a box that intercepts, passes through and returns communication, like any good proxy, and have that box only allow X amount of bandwidth per connection, and you have drastically reduced Netflix's capacity to chew on your bandwidth (at the expense of your consumers who hopefully cant tell the difference between SD and HD anyways).

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • 8bitogre8bitogre San Antonio, TXRegistered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    A static path TO AN IP ADDRESS. Please read the explanation I posted above.

    This feels like we are drifting away from XBO here... but if you have ever edited your hostfile to point to a different IP, then you know how this works.

    All the ISP has to do is set up a box that intercepts, passes through and returns communication, like any good proxy, and have that box only allow X amount of bandwidth per connection, and you have drastically reduced Netflix's capacity to chew on your bandwidth (at the expense of your consumers who hopefully cant tell the difference between SD and HD anyways).

    I do know how this works. I work on these things on a daily basis and what I'm paid to do for a living.

    The IP address that the traffic is sent to is controlled by DNS. We can all agree on that. However, the hops that it takes to get there, in between, is not controlled by DNS. Changing your DNS will not do that. The IP address/hostname that the consoles app is sending traffic to is more than likely hardcoded into the app itself, not something that is controlled by the ISP.

    If the ISP sets up something to intercept traffic and prioritize it (QoS, you can set something up on your home router/modem), changing your DNS won't fix that. That's all done at the gateway router. Even if your ISP was poisoning your DNS to point your traffic to another IP address, I doubt Netflix has a "slow server" that is set up for them to limit bandwidth.

    Telling people to switch to Google DNS, unless they have real DNS issues like a downed or badly overloaded server, is not going to solve anything. Any improvements will be a placebo to the expectation that it'll be better. I switched to Google DNS for a few weeks when my ISP had an issue and I noticed that lookups were taking longer than usual. I switched back once they fixed it after I reported it to them.

    If your ISP is a scumbag and throttling traffic over certain ports or protocols, the best you can do is either switch ISPs or call them out on it and hope they do something about it.

  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    edited January 2014
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    A static path TO AN IP ADDRESS. Please read the explanation I posted above.

    This feels like we are drifting away from XBO here... but if you have ever edited your hostfile to point to a different IP, then you know how this works.

    All the ISP has to do is set up a box that intercepts, passes through and returns communication, like any good proxy, and have that box only allow X amount of bandwidth per connection, and you have drastically reduced Netflix's capacity to chew on your bandwidth (at the expense of your consumers who hopefully cant tell the difference between SD and HD anyways).

    I do know how this works. I work on these things on a daily basis and what I'm paid to do for a living.

    The IP address that the traffic is sent to is controlled by DNS. We can all agree on that. However, the hops that it takes to get there, in between, is not controlled by DNS. Changing your DNS will not do that. The IP address/hostname that the consoles app is sending traffic to is more than likely hardcoded into the app itself, not something that is controlled by the ISP.

    If the ISP sets up something to intercept traffic and prioritize it (QoS, you can set something up on your home router/modem), changing your DNS won't fix that. That's all done at the gateway router. Even if your ISP was poisoning your DNS to point your traffic to another IP address, I doubt Netflix has a "slow server" that is set up for them to limit bandwidth.

    Telling people to switch to Google DNS, unless they have real DNS issues like a downed or badly overloaded server, is not going to solve anything. Any improvements will be a placebo to the expectation that it'll be better. I switched to Google DNS for a few weeks when my ISP had an issue and I noticed that lookups were taking longer than usual. I switched back once they fixed it after I reported it to them.

    If your ISP is a scumbag and throttling traffic over certain ports or protocols, the best you can do is either switch ISPs or call them out on it and hope they do something about it.

    Okay, one last time.

    server.x.com SHOULD point to 1.2.3.4

    using your ISP DNS,

    server.x.com MIGHT point to shittything.com, a box inside the ISPs network.

    Shittything takes your request and moves it along to where it should go, handling the traffic through a quality-reduced connection, keeping bandwidth draw at a minimum.

    syndalis on
    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • DehumanizedDehumanized Registered User regular
    And pray that you're not living in an area where your current ISP holds a monopoly.

  • tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    A static path TO AN IP ADDRESS. Please read the explanation I posted above.

    This feels like we are drifting away from XBO here... but if you have ever edited your hostfile to point to a different IP, then you know how this works.

    All the ISP has to do is set up a box that intercepts, passes through and returns communication, like any good proxy, and have that box only allow X amount of bandwidth per connection, and you have drastically reduced Netflix's capacity to chew on your bandwidth (at the expense of your consumers who hopefully cant tell the difference between SD and HD anyways).

    I do know how this works. I work on these things on a daily basis and what I'm paid to do for a living.

    The IP address that the traffic is sent to is controlled by DNS. We can all agree on that. However, the hops that it takes to get there, in between, is not controlled by DNS. Changing your DNS will not do that. The IP address/hostname that the consoles app is sending traffic to is more than likely hardcoded into the app itself, not something that is controlled by the ISP.

    If the ISP sets up something to intercept traffic and prioritize it (QoS, you can set something up on your home router/modem), changing your DNS won't fix that. That's all done at the gateway router. Even if your ISP was poisoning your DNS to point your traffic to another IP address, I doubt Netflix has a "slow server" that is set up for them to limit bandwidth.

    Telling people to switch to Google DNS, unless they have real DNS issues like a downed or badly overloaded server, is not going to solve anything. Any improvements will be a placebo to the expectation that it'll be better. I switched to Google DNS for a few weeks when my ISP had an issue and I noticed that lookups were taking longer than usual. I switched back once they fixed it after I reported it to them.

    If your ISP is a scumbag and throttling traffic over certain ports or protocols, the best you can do is either switch ISPs or call them out on it and hope they do something about it.

    Okay, one last time.

    server.x.com SHOULD point to 1.2.3.4

    using your ISP DNS,

    server.x.com MIGHT point to shittything.com, a box inside the ISPs network.

    Shittything takes your request and moves it along to where it should go, handling the traffic through a quality-reduced connection, keeping bandwidth draw at a minimum.

    I don't mean to dismiss your post in its entirety.... but I think you're taking the

    "*tinfoil hat*net neutrality*/tinfoil hat*"

    part of my earlier post a little too literally. :P

    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
  • 8bitogre8bitogre San Antonio, TXRegistered User regular
    edited January 2014
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    syndalis wrote: »
    8bitogre wrote: »
    Changing DNS wouldn't change the path that your Xbox/PS4/media device goes. All that would happen is that it would possibly get DNS changes quicker than using your ISPs. DNS has nothing to do with speed.

    It's called DNS as proxy, and its a real thing ISPs employ.

    Controlling the hops on services they want to throttle.

    They'd do that kind of routing at the router rather than DNS if they are controlling hops. DNS is a static path.

    A static path TO AN IP ADDRESS. Please read the explanation I posted above.

    This feels like we are drifting away from XBO here... but if you have ever edited your hostfile to point to a different IP, then you know how this works.

    All the ISP has to do is set up a box that intercepts, passes through and returns communication, like any good proxy, and have that box only allow X amount of bandwidth per connection, and you have drastically reduced Netflix's capacity to chew on your bandwidth (at the expense of your consumers who hopefully cant tell the difference between SD and HD anyways).

    I do know how this works. I work on these things on a daily basis and what I'm paid to do for a living.

    The IP address that the traffic is sent to is controlled by DNS. We can all agree on that. However, the hops that it takes to get there, in between, is not controlled by DNS. Changing your DNS will not do that. The IP address/hostname that the consoles app is sending traffic to is more than likely hardcoded into the app itself, not something that is controlled by the ISP.

    If the ISP sets up something to intercept traffic and prioritize it (QoS, you can set something up on your home router/modem), changing your DNS won't fix that. That's all done at the gateway router. Even if your ISP was poisoning your DNS to point your traffic to another IP address, I doubt Netflix has a "slow server" that is set up for them to limit bandwidth.

    Telling people to switch to Google DNS, unless they have real DNS issues like a downed or badly overloaded server, is not going to solve anything. Any improvements will be a placebo to the expectation that it'll be better. I switched to Google DNS for a few weeks when my ISP had an issue and I noticed that lookups were taking longer than usual. I switched back once they fixed it after I reported it to them.

    If your ISP is a scumbag and throttling traffic over certain ports or protocols, the best you can do is either switch ISPs or call them out on it and hope they do something about it.

    Okay, one last time.

    server.x.com SHOULD point to 1.2.3.4

    using your ISP DNS,

    server.x.com MIGHT point to shittything.com, a box inside the ISPs network.

    Shittything takes your request and moves it along to where it should go, handling the traffic through a quality-reduced connection, keeping bandwidth draw at a minimum.

    Again, one last time.

    Maintaining a secondary box to do QoS is stupid and no ISP would do it. For a number of reasons:
    • It's yet another thing you have to maintain
    • You described it as an inline device. Which means if it goes down, ALL THE INTERNET GOES DOWN FOR EVERYTHING. No ISP would do this.
    • Most importantly, it's too easy to bypass. If the goal is to reduce bandwidth, they wouldn't make it so easy to work around.

    All that stuff is handled at the gateway router or firewall.

    Changing your DNS server does not and will not bypass that.

    8bitogre on
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    But it does, and it has, and there are other people out there who have found switching to Google's DNS fixed their issues, especially if they use Comcast or TWC.

    If maintaining a device can save an ISP hundreds / thousands of TB of bandwidth a month with minimal complaints from end users you bet your ass they will incorporate it. And no, its not inline. I have no idea where you got that. It's simply a proxy-like device on their internal network, handling specific requests they direct to it.

    And its only easy to bypass if you have working knowledge of how to edit DHCP settings / even think to do this.

    Just try it and tell me what happens, whomever is having trouble with their netflix streaming. This is a thing I have done with multiple devices over the years to great success, specifically when I have to use TWC. I had no such issues on FiOS.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • zllehszllehs Hiding in a box, waiting to strike.Registered User regular
    Wheres the new thread @syndalis?

  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
  • 8bitogre8bitogre San Antonio, TXRegistered User regular
    syndalis wrote: »
    But it does, and it has, and there are other people out there who have found switching to Google's DNS fixed their issues, especially if they use Comcast or TWC.

    If maintaining a device can save an ISP hundreds / thousands of TB of bandwidth a month with minimal complaints from end users you bet your ass they will incorporate it. And no, its not inline. I have no idea where you got that. It's simply a proxy-like device on their internal network, handling specific requests they direct to it.

    And its only easy to bypass if you have working knowledge of how to edit DHCP settings / even think to do this.

    Just try it and tell me what happens, whomever is having trouble with their netflix streaming. This is a thing I have done with multiple devices over the years to great success, specifically when I have to use TWC. I had no such issues on FiOS.

    This is my last post on this subject. Take it for what you will, but I will break it down for you.

    Firstly - I've worked in many a large corporate environments as well as contract work for companies that host and serve SaaS products. There is no way, EVER, that someone would put in an extra box (which you have to purchase, set up, maintain and license) to do something that is possible natively in a product you are already using in your core infrastructure. It's not cost effective, period.

    Secondly - Changing your DNS is not a strange, archaic journey that it used to be. I've worked with endusers who could click their way out of a paper back that have switched their DNS servers to Google DNS because people, no matter what the issue is, always go "Change your DNS servers".

    Thirdly - The fact that you have no problems on FiOS renders your point entirely moot. Verizon is THE WORST at throttling bandwidth, especially to things like Youtube and Netflix, and are one of the most egregious when it comes to it. They actually won a case that allows them to charge MORE for traffic delivery for content websites (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-14/verizon-victory-on-net-neutrality-rules-seen-as-loss-for-netflix.html).

    The traffic that passes from your home internet to everything outside of it is controlled by a peering arrangement, which is controlled by your ISP, from their routers. DNS does not bypass this.

This discussion has been closed.