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[Board Games]: Meeples, Minis, Dice, Cards and Tokens galore!

ForarForar #432Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
Hey there! This thread is about board games. Let me tell you about them!
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Welcome, traveller! But perhaps you come to this thread as a regular attendee; in that case, I move aside to let you pass, give you a fraternal nod, and I gesture you towards your regular chair. For the rest of you, I continue:

Perhaps you have heard tales of “penile locomotives” (see above spoilered comic and associated post). Perhaps you have been referred here, and still grasp the scribbled directions to this odd corner of the PA district, itself an odd corner of the Coruscant-like internet metropolis. Perhaps a search has brought you here, dropping you off unceremoniously at our door like some rude chauffeur. Whatever the circumstances, I again say, welcome!

This thread exists to convey one simple message: board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk. Like, a really long way. Perhaps you like those well enough, but fear the time investment. Perhaps you’re looking for quick games to play during your lunch hour. Perhaps you’re looking for something for when friends want to hang out. Perhaps you’re looking for an all-day simulation of the asymmetrical struggles of Europe during the Protestant Reformation. No problem, gotcha covered. So without further ado, let me attempt to give you a barely-sketched outline of what is possible in cardboard, wood and plastic.


GREAT GAMES TO INTRODUCE TO JUST ABOUT ANYONE (including those new to games):

Ticket to Ride
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Quite possibly one of the best entry-level games. Draw cards into your hands, claim a route between two cities with your train cars by laying down same-color cards that match a route on the board. Simple, intuitive. Kids can grasp it, adults can play it more cut-throat and get into deeper strategies. Many versions have been made; they are pretty much all great, but check to see how many people can play. There’s also plenty of expansion maps, including a highly-rated Asia map for team play up to 6.

Dominion
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This genre-defining game is played entirely with cards. Hey, I thought we were talking about board games! We are, shut up, it’s a problem of semantics, whatever. Anyway, in this game you build up your own personal deck by accumulating money cards (to buy things), action cards (to make cool stuff happen), and victory point cards (which give you points but clog up your deck). Each game has different action cards to buy so every game is different. There are a TON of expansions; good ones are Seaside (adds effects which carry over into later turns), Intrigue (a lot more interaction between players), and Prosperity (adds higher-value money and victory point cards). It plays fast, but some of the expansions slow it down a bit. Don’t buy Village.

Carcassonne
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Another older game, which has aged well because of its short length and wide appeal. Pick up a tile, add it to the tiles already placed so that you match the road, castle, or field. You may optionally “claim” a road, castle, or field with one of your followers or “meeples”, which gives you points. A great, quick game for pretty much all ages, but it is especially good for a younger crowd.

Small World
Wil Wheaton! In this very spoiler! But if you let him out you'll have to say his name three times to put him back.
Choose from the randomized races, spread out, hold key areas, gain points every round. Once you have extended as much as you can, put the race into decline (i.e. you can’t do anything with it but it still gives you points), and choose a new race. You get the good feeling from wiping someone out without as much of the hurt feelings, because they can just get a new race and ethnic-cleanse you in return. Popular, has a bunch of expansions.

Lords of Waterdeep
Newer game, but it has really made a splash. It’s a fairly light worker-placement euro that non-gamers (or minimal-gamers) really seem to enjoy. The “worker-placement” part is themed up as sending knights and wizards off to accomplish quests, and there’s even a bit of back-stabbery against the other players.


REALLY GOOD TWO-PLAYER GAMES:

Twilight Struggle
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Probably the best epic 2-player game. Epic because of its length and scope. Intensely confrontational without being a wargame. Imagine a game about the Cold War where the mechanics take, at face value, the rhetoric of both sides. In other words, it’s the USA versus the USSR, and all the other nations in the world are just pawns to be influenced one way or the other. Influence is what you “spend” every round, to control a nation or even cause an uprising in a less-stable nation. Influence tends to spread through a region like a virus. You can use an event card for the event (which is some historical event or concept), or use it for influence, or even put it towards the space race. The only possible downside is that it’s long for a 2-player game, so it may be hard to introduce to a casual gaming group.

Memoir '44
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This is simply the easiest introduction into a whole family of light wargames: Commands & Colors: Ancients, Commands & Colors: Napoleonics, BattleLore, BattleCry. Most can be played within an hour, but can feel suitable epic. The basic idea is that the battlefield is divided into a left, center, and right flank. You play a card that “orders” units in a flank (or flanks), which allows it to move and attack. You attack by rolling dice, which can cause hits or retreats. You win by wiping out a set number of units (and maybe occupying critical points). A brilliant system that each game has a special “spin” on. Memoir is a bit simpler and has a very appealing theme. Ancients is also highly regarded here (and is my favorite); it has a priority on melee attacks and gives additional benefits if your units are lined up.

Summoner Wars
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Think of this as some strange asymmetric chess variant where the pieces are cards. Each player chooses a faction, and your goal is to kill the enemy summoner. Your units are ranged or melee, and have different attack strengths, and different hit points. You attack with dice. You bring new units out of your hand onto the board if you can pay the cost in magic. You gain magic by killing units or by dumping cards from your hand. Each faction plays VERY differently, and in fact every single card has some special ability (like moving extra spaces or attacking in a different way). There are a TON of factions for this game -- I think 16 right now -- and expansions for limited deck construction, and even some alternate summoners, so there’s a lot of stuff to try out.

Battle Line
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This SOUNDS like another combat game, but it’s not. It’s an abstract game where you’ve got 9 flags in a row, and you take turns playing one card in front of a flag. You need a better “set” of three cards in front of a flag to “claim” that flag as yours. Get 5 total flags or 3 adjacent flags to win. It’s a game where you’re working through the odds of finishing a “set”, against a bit of guessing as to what your opponent is holding onto in his hand.

Hive
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This is an abstract game where the entire game is 22 hexagon pieces of bakelite. There’s not even a board. The pieces are bugs, each of which moves in a particular way. The winner is the one that surrounds the enemy queen. It looks pretty nice as the game plays itself out, too.

BattleCON (War of Indines)
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Round 1! Fight! Yes, another "fighting game simulation" where you have a movement track and play attacks simultaneously, and try to out-think/out-maneuver your opponent. Your "hand" is made up of a few "styles" (unique to your character) and "bases" (mostly the same for everyone), and an attack combines one style and one base. Any attack you do is on "cooldown" and can’t be used for 2 beats. The game comes with 18 characters, and they are all QUITE different to play. This one will inevitably get compared to Yomi (and Flash Duel), but I think that this is somewhat easier and/or more fun to learn. The print-and-play comes with 4 characters and is pretty easy to put together, if you want to try it out.

Android: Netrunner
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Newer asymmetric game that is very geeky and very good. The "corporation" player must defend and score their agendas. The "hacker" player must steal agendas from the "corporation". The agendas are worth points, and first to 7 points wins. What really sets this one apart is that almost everything the corporation does is hidden information (i.e. face-down cards), so there's ample room for bluffing and traps. This is a "Living Card Game", which means that there are numerous expansions, each of which is a fixed number of cards so you know what you're buying. Still allows for spending a lot on the game, but the base game comes with a LOT of stuff to try out (i.e. multiple hacker and corporation "identities").


BIG-GROUP FUN (6+ players):

Bohnanza
Great little game of planting, trading, and harvesting beans. The trick is that you can’t rearrange your hand; you must trade in order to plant the beans you want. Once you get enough of a particular type of bean (or when you’re forced to plant another type of bean), harvest it for points. It get special kudos from me because it’s great with kids and adults. Plays up to 7.

Dixit (Odyssey)
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A party game! Well, sort of. In this game everybody is given a hand of imaginative, surreal, and evocative cards. The active player puts a card face down, and give a phrase, word, or noise that goes with it. Everyone else ALSO puts in a card that best goes with that “clue”. They are mixed up, shown, and people get points for picking the active player’s card, or for getting people to choose their card. But if the clue is too obvious or too hard, the active player gets NO points. So there are serious demands made on the imagination of the players -- dull clues or simply half-hearted ones diminish the game experience. But knowing that caveat, it’s a GREAT game. There are a couple of versions of this one, but Odyssey plays up to 12.

Time’s Up! (Title Recall)
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Another party game, but you might call this one a “proper” party game. You play in pairs, and you have 30 seconds at a time to make your partner guess what’s on the cards. In the first round, you can use just about any clues, gestures, and noises. In the second round, you are limited to ONE WORD for a clue and one guess. In the third round, NO talking but gestures and noises still allowed. Absolute hilarity ensues. The "Title Recall" version is the best, because even if you don't know the movie/book/song, you can give hints one word at a time (i.e. "Devil With the Blue Dress On" is easier than "Rutherford B. Hayes" if you are unfamiliar with both).

Citadels
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Straight-forward, almost bare-bones social game that is also great and plays up to 8. Pass around the role cards, pick one secretly, the king calls out the roles in order. A good way to introduce the “social” type of board games.

7 Wonders
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30-minute game that is VERY popular game these-a-days for a group of up to 7. You build up a civilization, which really just means you play cards that produce some product, or provide military strength, or give you points directly, or improves your science. So multiple win paths, which is always cool. Each player has a hand, but you only play ONE card before passing your hand to the adjacent player. You can also trade with your neighbors, so overall you are VERY interested in what other players are doing, and you often have to change your strategy to thwart theirs. Highly recommended by this thread.

The Resistance
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You ever play mafia or werewolf? Some smart guy boiled it down into a 5-10 player game that can be played in 30 minutes. Every round someone becomes the leader, who then chooses a team for a mission. Each person on the team secretly contribute a “pass” or “fail” card for that mission. Since there are spies, some missions are going to fail. Incriminations will fall like the rain on the moor. Best 3 out of 5 missions. An elegant and tense social game, but like all social games it is somewhat dependent on the group. Quick enough for multiple games (which will often be stridently demanded). There's also a newer, advanced version of this game called "Resistance: Avalon", where one character (Merlin) knows who the bad guys are, but the bad guys will win if they identify Merlin.


LONGER GAMES (3+ hours):

Twilight Imperium (3rd edition)
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Ah, the game that defines epic space expansion and warfare. In a nutshell, the hex-based “board” is made up of planetary systems, which can be conquered. You “spend” command tokens to activate a system and move stuff there or build stuff. Then there’s technology research, trading, dice-based warfare, secret objectives, phase selection, a hand of action cards,... and on and on. Pretty intense. Pretty long. But there’s something about the theme that makes it almost irresistible.

Eclipse
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This game LOOKS similar to Twilight Imperium. Sci-fi space exploration with hexes, dice combat, and tech research. However, it is QUITE different in scope and "feel". This is a premier mechanic-centered euro in the same class as Power Grid and Agricola. This means that it’s a bit more indirect than you might expect in the genre; it has been described as “intensely passive-aggressive”. Many of your thoughts are about optimizing your actions or making other people’s actions sub-optimal, rather than "space ship battle pew pew". However, direct conflict has a definite place in this game, and furthermore it has awesome stuff like exploration-produced initial maps, and also customizing your own spacecraft blueprints.

Arkham Horror
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In many ways this is on the other end of the spectrum from the sterile spaceships and abstracted planet-conquering of Twilight Imperium or Eclipse. This game is all about the atmosphere, and trying to hold it together while you avoid being devoured by nameless horrors. Those horrors are of the Lovecraftian kind, and the rulebook kind. Seriously, the FAQ has its own FAQ. But if you can pierce through the “rule crust” into the pulsing black heart of the game, you’ll probably... uh... go insane. But madmen are often happy, right?

Risk: Legacy
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This has consistently been one of the most-talked-about games since it came out. It’s a streamlined version of Risk with a huge twist -- after each game you will permanently alter the board (naming a continent, adding a city), the cards (ripping up(!) one of them), and/or the rule book itself. It comes with packets that you will open after meeting certain criteria. It’s meant to be played over 15 games with the same group of people, producing a totally unique map which is also a testament to each previous battle. Not all groups can make this kind of commitment, but we can dream, can’t we?

Dominant Species
A grand worker-placement and area-control game, that still very successfully conveys the theme of struggling for survival on a map that’s far too small and environmentally hostile.

War of the Ring
The definitive LOTR experience in board game form. It’s everybody against the Sauron player, and you have to keep the One Ring out of his hands while also keeping his armies from turning Middle-Earth into a suburb of Mordor.


And here are some common board game categories, and some representative games for each:

DECK-BUILDING:
Dominion -- (mentioned above)

Thunderstone (Advance)
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This was the next big game after Dominion that used the same mechanic, but it has a real theme! It’s a dungeon crawl. Wait, what? No, seriously! The basic idea is that you alternate between buying adventurers and weapons and stuff in the village to improve your deck, and then trying to defeat monsters in the dungeon, which also get added to your deck, giving you points and other benefits. Has a ton of expansions. There’s a new version of this called “Thunderstone Advance” that is probably your best choice if you’re starting off.

Quarriors
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Dice. Lots of dice. Cool dice. You roll dice and buy things with... ugh... “quiddity” shown on them. You buy monsters that attack other players’ monsters. Doesn’t have a lot of depth, especially when compared to other games with this mechanic (I would lean towards calling it filler), but it’s flashy and quick and good for getting an “Oh, cool!” out of people you introduce it to. There are some "advanced rules" if you want to mix up and/or deepen the gameplay, though it makes the game a bit longer.

Ascension

ROLE SELECTION
Puerto Rico
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The premier euro game. Shoot, the premier board game. Rich, deep, and meaty. Grow crops, sell them, buy buildings which give you abilities and benefits, and you need laborers for all this stuff as well. You choose a role which helps you in some way every round. High player interaction, though it's not direct. For such a deep game, it’s not actually that difficult to teach to new players, but there can be a big gulf in player skill. Some people who have played this forever can be a bit hostile to newbies, but that is NOT true of the people in this thread, that I've seen. Playable online -- many people here will help you get started if you ask.

Race for the Galaxy
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Card-based space-exploration/conquest economic game, though the theme isn’t very strong. Players choose a phase simultaneously, and the only phases in the round are the ones that players picked. Has a pretty dense iconography, making it a bit daunting for new players, but it allows for a fleshed-out and satisfying game with multiple paths to victory. Low player interaction. Has a bunch of expansions; I suggest the first one (Gathering Storm), as it improves the base game and adds some optional goals to provide a focus for new players. Good with two players, also.

Citadels
-- see above

ROUTE BUILDING/CLAIMING:

Ticket to Ride (mentioned above)

Power Grid
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A meaty, polished, economic game. Buy a network of cities, bid on power plants to power those cities, profit. You need to supply your power plants with resources (oil, nuclear, etc), but the cost of a resource goes up if everybody needs it. There’s math. LOTS of math. There’s also a bit of fiddling as you decide the turn order (and whether you’re going through it forwards or backwards), refilling resources, knowing when to go to “Step 2/3”, and so on. So not really an introductory-level game, but very satisfying.

Steam
This is the latest incarnation of a very good series of route-building goods-delivery games. This one is great because it has a totally viable "basic" version of the rules, streamlined and appropriate for casual groups, and a "standard" version of the rules, with auctions for everything and a much more demanding economic system. It's almost two games in one. Whenever I play Ticket to Ride (except for the Asia team game), I fantasize about playing this one instead.

HIDDEN TRAITOR:

Battlestar Galactica
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In the description for The Resistance, I called it “tense”. Battestar Galactica redefines the term into something devastating. It’s a game with a strong theme from the TV series, but the game is good enough to be fully enjoyed by people who have who have never seen the show. The goal is to get to Earth, but the ship is faced with environmental threats in deep space, hostile Cylon warships, and internal Cylon traitors. Each player has a hand of cards that is used to meet (or sabotage) these threats. The basic flow is “Jump into terrible location, deal with terrible event after terrible event, deal with an increasingly terrible Cylon armada, and then jump again... if anybody is still alive”. Popular here on the forums as PbP.

ABSTRACT:
Ingenious
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Great, intuitive abstract that scales well from 2-4. Place a tile on the hexagonal board to score points for matching icons. You need to score well in EVERY icon type, because only your WORST icon score is your actual score. Get it? Part of the appeal of this game is the excellent component quality. Chunky plastic tiles, fabric bag, and solid cardboard.

Blokus
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A more confrontational abstract, where you simply need to get as many of your pieces on the board as possible. Anything not placed counts against you. Blocking others is inevitable but still tricky. Simple enough for young players. A possible downside is that it is really best with 4 players. For a slightly more flexible (in terms of players) and forgiving variant, try Blokus Trigon. But my wife swears by the original.

Through the Desert
Another Knizia classic. You place colored camels one at a time, getting points by getting to an oasis or cordoning off a section of the board. It's vaguely reminiscent of Go, actually.

Hive -- (mentioned above)

OP shamelessly stolen from @jergarmar

First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
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Posts

  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    WORKER PLACEMENT:
    Lords of Waterdeep (mentioned above)

    Kingsburg
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    A pretty and fairly light dice-driven euro. Roll dice, place dice, manipulate dice. Build buildings and reap the rewards. Fairly high amounts of interaction. You’re fighting over resources, but at the end of every round you fight off a growing Horde. Each phase has lots of interesting choices. Has some catch-up mechanics too, making it fairly easy to introduce to new players.

    Agricola
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    Farming-themed game of resource management. Sound exciting? It is! You struggle just to get your family fed, and yet you also need to scrabble for resources to improve your farm. One of the most satisfying things is upgrading your wood hut to stone. Fairly easy to teach to others, simply because the theme is so immediately understandable, and the turns are quick, and because at the end of the game, even if you lose, you can admire and show off the farm you made. So I would call it a good introduction to the longer euro games.

    NEGOTIATION:
    Cosmic Encounter
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    A strange entry into this genre, but this is a difficult-to-classify and yet really good group game that I must mention. In this game each player has 5 planets and 20 ships, and to win they need to get at least one ship (a "colony") on 5 foreign worlds. Each player also gets an alien power, and some of them are absurdly powerful and unfair. But that just means that they will find everyone teaming up against them. You don't choose who to attack (the destiny deck decides that), but you CAN choose who to ally with. So it takes the fangs out of the confrontation, and fewer people get their feelings hurt. It's very much a social game that can be played as friendly or as back-stabby as the group wishes. It's not TOO serious or strategic, so it might not be the best for your hardcore wargame group, but it is a lighter game that has aged amazingly well.

    Game of Thrones
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    I LOVE that I'm putting this game after Cosmic Encounter. They could not be more different in tone. CE is ponies and rainbows, and this one is flint knives and broken glass. In other games there is a back-stab mechanic -- in this game it is the driving force of the game. This is because you have your territory to defend, but you simply can’t defend against all threats. You place order tokens face down into different regions on the board, allowing for a surprise on the reveal phase. And even after you reveal, you have opportunities for deception (for example, promising to help defend but then you join the attack). Here’s a bible verse: “Behold, you are trusting in Egypt, that broken reed of a staff, which will pierce the hand of any man who leans on it.” Except that EVERYBODY is Egypt, including you. As soon as you reeeeally need someone to support you (or vice versa), that's when they will invade your unprotected flank, undoing what it took you half the game to build up. There seems to be some common sentiments that this is the kind of game where you can’t WAIT to play again... and also where you FEAR playing it again.

    TRADING:
    Settlers of Catan
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    Ah, the grandfather of what’s called the “euro-game”. Little direct confrontation, trading, grabbing valuable resources or positions before your opponent, a bit abstract, and you win by accumulating the most points. You accumulate and trade to get certain combinations of resources to get cities and roads. Your cities help you gather more resources. It’s a bit grey around the temples these days, and there are probably better expressions of these mechanics, but it has stood the test of time and one huge reason to include it here is that you may have already played it. If you want an expansion, get “Seafarers”.

    Bohnanza
    -- see above

    COOPERATIVE:
    Pandemic
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    This is the most “mainline” of a group of games with similar mechanics. The others are Forbidden Island (search for treasure theme, a bit easier) and Defenders of the Realm (fantasy theme, a bit more involved). You play cooperatively against the game, needed to coordinate and combine your special abilities in order not to die horribly. In Pandemic the theme is fighting disease outbreaks all over the world.

    Space Alert
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    One criticism of standard co-op games is that a knowledgeable player can power-game and boss the other players around. Space Alert seeks to solve this problem by making “that guy” the captain (responsible for any and all failures), and by adding a time restraint. You actually play a track off of a CD, which will give you a certain amount of time to meet each threat. You play cards to “go to this room, press this button” to deal with the threat. After the mission track is over, you go through everyone’s cards and determine whether you succeeded, or (much more likely) you determine which threat caused everyone to die a gruesome death. Super cool but also a much more intense and stressful games than some people enjoy. But those people don’t deserve to be your friends, now, do they?

    AREA CONTROL:
    El Grande
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    An older euro game, but the daddy of all area control games, and still very highly regarded. You play "caballeros" into regions adjacent to the movable “king” figure, and then you score points in a region by having more of them than the others. There are semi-randomized event cards which drive the action every round, so every game and every round is different. A bit abstract but still pretty approachable.

    Chaos in the Old World
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    Area control meets Warhammer fantasy chaos gods. Not exactly child-safe content (“Rain of Pus”, et al), but a strong theme meeting a solid euro mechanic. Encourages some deliciously evil role-playing and temporary alliances. The characters play out VERY differently in how they score points and manage their hand -- kudos for the (mostly) balanced asymmetrical play. Popular here as PbP.

    Age of Empires III: Age of Discovery
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    A bit of genre-crossing while colonizing the new world. You place colonists to establish control of an area, but you’re also putting down buildings to get benefits and points, and doing some worker-placement to make stuff happen. “Stuff” can be over-generalized as discovery, trading, and colonizing, each of which is a valid path to victory. A nice way to scratch that civilization-building itch in just a couple of hours.

    RACING:
    RoboRally
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    Programmable robots! You choose 5 instruction cards out of your hand to move your robot on a board filled with hazards. Cards are revealed simultaneously, keeping the action moving along. You need to land on flags in order, which are scattered across the board. If you bump another robot, that robot continues its instructions for that round, potentially driving it into a pit or missing the flag. Hugely customizable -- it’s almost a game system in its own right, allowing and encouraging variants like “blocker” robots and team-based capture-the-flag.

    Galaxy Trucker
    Racing game? Well, yeah, but the most fun is the time-limited and frenzied ship-building phase. Or maybe the most fun is watching your friend’s ship get sawn in half by an errant meteor. Anyway, you get points for bringing home cargo ahead of your competitors, but there’s a good chance that nobody even makes it to the finish line. And nobody seems to mind!

    Formula D
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    An attractive Formula 1 racing game. There are some flaws here, such as a runaway-leader problem and player elimination, but it plays quickly so it doesn’t matter TOO much. You want to get into the higher gears to move faster, but it has a contrary push-your-luck mechanic in that you have to stop X number of times in a corner. It also has drafting, customizable car stats, and fiery crashes. It plays a LOT of people, too -- up to 10.

    DEXTERITY:
    Crokinole
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    Dexterity games are not mentioned much here, but they are still worth a look. Crokinole is a classic where the gameplay revolves around flicking disks into certain areas of a circular board. It’s also about letting your teammates down, after being set up for the perfect shot. This is an expensive game, but it can also be a beautiful conversation-starting display game.

    Sorry! Sliders
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    This is a cheap, readily available dexterity game that kids seem to love. You slide pieces down a track to score points on a concentric-ring target. The track can be made longer for a more “adult” difficulty.

    Pitchcar
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    A modern dexterity classic where you race around a track by flicking your car. There’s also a version of Sorry! Sliders (Cars 2?) with this mechanic that might be easier to find.

    Catacombs
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    A newer dexterity game with a dungeon-crawl twist. You flick your heroes (or monsters) against the enemy to score “hits”. Some characters are ranged and have little discs to fire, also.

    TACTICAL MINIATURES:
    X-Wing Miniatures Game
    This is probably one of the biggest wallet-smacking games in this thread, but it’s irresistible. It’s a fairly quick and easy system to send a handful of TIE fighters against a couple of X-Wings and see what happens. Oh, but there’s also Y-Wings. And TIE Interceptors. And A-Wings. And the Millenium Falcon and Slave 1. And they all look pretty great. You can also choose pilots like Luke and Vader and Biggs, and add mech droids like good ol’ R2-D2. But for a proper game you’ll probably want 2 core sets, 1 X-Wing and 1 TIE (for the extra pilots), a couple of Interceptors, a couple more rebel ships to taste.... yeah. But it’s Star Wars! So queue up the John Williams on your MP3 player and get started.

    Super Dungeon Explore
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    Some games here remind one of a video game (i.e. space exploration --> Masters of Orion); this game tries to evoke something like Gauntlet in a more direct way. Anime-style characters, monster spawning portals, light hack-n-slash gameplay, and really really impressive miniatures. But there's the rub -- you have to put the darn things together, and it is NOT trivial. But once you're done, you'll have something that turns heads when you bring it out.

    Descent 2.0
    Looking for an old-fashioned fantasy RPG with an epic campaign, packaged into bite-sized scenarios? You might try this one. This new version has really boiled it down to it’s best parts, and there’s already expansions in the works, so there’s no better time to jump into it.

    D&D games
    This is not a single game, but a whole family of light dungeon-crawl skirmish games (Wrath of Ashardalon, Legend of Drizzt, Castle Ravenloft), which are all compatible with each other and have some pretty cool looking monsters.

    LIGHT/SHORT/FILLER:
    7 Wonders (mentioned above)

    King of Tokyo
    A little game by Richard Garfield (i.e. creator of Magic) that is way more fun than it has any right to be. Each player is a giant monster, and you can attack each other by rolling a bunch of dice, but the big points are gained when you go into Tokyo and stay there for as long as you can. While you're there you can be attacked by everybody, so there's a push-your-luck element to it.

    Hey, That's My Fish!
    Fun game of sliding penguins and claiming fish and blocking opponents, that's ALSO cutthroat enough for adults to play.

    Love Letter

    Roll Through the Ages
    A surprisingly satisfying little civ-building dice-rolling game.

    No Thanks
    pic225997_md.jpg
    Simple, light bidding (or perhaps anti-bidding) game that everybody enjoys. Each player is given chips, which give them the ability to "pass" and avoid taking a card. The chips build up on the card until somebody takes it. Plays in 20 minutes, tops.

    For Sale
    pic712836_md.jpg
    Simple auction game that everybody likes. In the first phase you bid on properties ranging from cardboard box to space station. In the second phase you blind bid properties to get checks. Count up the checks at the end and the person with the most money wins.

    AND INTRODUCING SOME REGULARS TO THE THREAD :

    JonBob
    JonBob

    Short, filler games
    No Thanks! - This game is basically perfect. A very small set of rules leads to very interesting emergent behavior.
    For Sale - What No Thanks! does for push-your-luck games, For Sale does for auctions. Simple, quick, easy to teach.
    King of Tokyo - Roar! Monsters! Everyone can get into the theme here, and it's hard to take it too seriously. Power Up! is a great expansion, but it does make the game longer.

    Light, Gateway games
    Ticket to Ride is a classic for good reason. The base game is greatly improved by 1910, and Team Asia is also fantastic.
    Pandemic remains my favorite co-op, especially revitalized with On the Brink.
    San Juan... I honestly prefer it to papa Puerto Rico or twin brother Race for the Galaxy] in most ways. I'm in the minority.

    Light, but not really gateway, games
    Dominion is still probably the best basic deckbuilding game mechanically, if it is thematically dry. Try Prosperity first if you want to expand it.
    7 Wonders is short, but can be fairly deep. You won't understand what decisions are good ones the first time, which is why I don't put it in "gateway." The second time and thereafter, it's a blast. Best with the Leaders expansion.
    Kingdom Builder is dry, but the variable setup lends a lot of variety. It's basically an abstract, and I think refines ideas from classics like Through the Desert very well.

    An oddball suggestion
    Zendo is my favorite board game, bar none. I barely ever get to play it.

    Trynant
    Favorite Games:
    Earth Reborn - Best tactical minis game out there. Crazy deep almost to the point of simulation, but slowly eases you into it. Cannot recommend enough.
    Archipelago - Maybe not for everyone, but this game takes a good worker placement game and adds a heavy dose of theme and player interaction. Clever, amazing game.
    Space Alert - The best coop game. Play space cadets trying to deal with alien attacks, but in REAL TIME (tm). Great stuff.
    Dominant Species - Best game closest to a traditional worker-placement game I've played; although it's more like an abstract war game in many ways!
    Splotter games (Great Zimbabwe, Roads and Boats, Indonesia, Antiquity, Greed Inc.) - if you can get your hands on one (or more) of these, do so. Best kinds of straight euros out there.

    Worst Games:
    Fluxx
    Munchkin
    Titan
    HORUS HERESY - what an awful game

    Namrok
    My favorite games lately are Commands & Colors: Ancients and Napoleonics. Their fluid, quick gameplay really captures the feel of the battles for me, but stays relatively rules light. After that there is Chaos in the Old World, one of my favorite blends of European and American styles, and an exemplary case of asymmetric gameplay. I've also been completely enamored by X-Wing lately. The pilot skill system creates this fantastic sliding scale of partial knowledge as you take your turn. Plus individual actions resolve incredibly fast for a miniatures game. On the lighter side I've finally discovered Roll Through the Ages, and adore it. It's amazing how well this game captures civilization building in a 20 minute dice game that doesn't just feel like Yahtzee or shameless push your luck.

    ArcticLancer
    Core Worlds is still probably my favourite game. Even without Galactic Orders, it doesn't play out the same twice. Even when you don't win, you still have fun along the way. It's not an overly complex game, and it tends to work pretty well at damn near any player count. Overall, Core Worlds is full of genuinely meaningful decisions. Since drafting and actions happen interchangably, you have to make some tough choices, and it combines a strong tactical element (What is my priority right now? Is someone else going to take the card/world I want before I take another turn?) with a strong strategic element as you aim to take your final worlds.
    Everything syncs up remarkably well, and is supported with nicely flowing gameplay and gorgeous artwork.

    Inquisitor
    Favorite games:

    A Few Acres of Snow, Chaos in the Old World (sans expansion), GOSU, Citadels, Puerto Rico, Ghost Stories (favorite co-op), Twilight Struggle. Ascension (strictly as a portable, play by post, iOS experience).

    Games I dislike that other people like:

    Arkham Horror, Space Alert, Galaxy Trucker, Dominion

    jakobagger
    All-time favourites:
    A Game of Thrones: the Board Game
    Battlestar Galactica
    Blood Bowl
    Chaos in the Old World
    Civilization (2010)
    Dominion
    Dune
    Magic: the Gathering
    Puerto Rico
    Through the Ages
    Twilight Struggle

    Currently playing (apart from favourites):
    7 Wonders
    A Few Acres of Snow
    Blood Bowl Team Manager
    Citadels
    Horus Heresy
    Infiltration
    Innovation
    Lords of Waterdeep

    Want to get into/play more:
    Andean Abyss
    Android: Netrunner
    Republic of Rome

    Games I was less into:
    Ideology: the War of Ideas
    Junta
    Monopoly
    Outpost
    Power Grid: Factory Manager
    Zombies!!!

    I like: strong theme combined with tight/elegant mechanics, asymmetry/variable player powers, moving dudes around on a map, some amount of luck to ensure variation and re-playability (Cards over dice), breaking up turns to remove or minimize downtime.

    Dislike: overly dry or pasted-on theme, abstracts, games with perfect information and no luck (games that feel solvable I guess?), games with too much randomness or unpredictability, games that are longer than their depth can justify.

    Vyolynce
    I write about board games. A lot. Like, every other week for the last five years and counting. And I play more than that, thanks to a great weekly group at my FLGS that has been meeting for over six years now.

    As a Magic Judge, I'm predisposed to liking card-based games and have a definite bias against randomness (read: dice) affecting strategy*. As such, some of my favorite games are Race for the Galaxy, Sentinels of the Multiverse, and Ascension. You can see my full Top 10 (and collection) on BGG. I'm also a big fan of abstracts, but those don't usually get talked about as much since they're typically dry two-player affairs. Sadly, I don't get to play as many "epic" games as I would like due to my Board Game Night happening in the middle of the work week.

    *Games where dice drive strategy (Castles of Burgundy, Alien Frontiers) are usually ok.

    Good places to play games online:

    Boite a Jeux
    -- Agricola
    -- Alhambra
    -- Castles of Burgundy
    -- Dixit
    -- Trajan

    OCTGN
    -- THE place to play Android: Netrunner

    Yucata
    -- A Few Acres of Snow
    -- Roll Through the Ages
    -- El Grande
    -- Fearsome Floors
    -- Hawaii
    -- Stone Age

    Board Game Arena
    -- Race for the Galaxy
    -- Seasons
    -- Puerto Rico
    -- Libertalia
    -- Troyes
    -- Caylus

    BrettspielWelt
    -- ton of games but daunting


    Good places to find out more about games:

    BoardGameGeek
    The definitive site for all things board game. Forums, reviews, pictures, marketplace, you name it. Also complex and daunting at first. If you want to start using it, just start with looking up games you're interested in.

    The Dice Tower (also has The Dice Tower podcast)
    Very good podcast that is also an umbrella for a bunch of gaming podcasts and reviewers. Tom Vasel himself is a pretty good reviewer, but not so interested in the heavier euro games, especially those with threadbare themes.

    Shut Up and Sit Down
    Paul and Quinns are very funny reviewers of board games. The videos are great, but I think their blog reviews can be even better.

    Critical Failures PbP Gaming Index
    A repository of PbP games. Quite an assortment. Especially successful are Battlestar Galactica and Chaos in the Old World.

    Kickstarter Tabletop Games
    NEVER GO HERE. You'll end up paying some ridiculous amount for a miniatures game that won't ship for like 6 months because of the meticulously crafted minis and numerous stretch goals that they add-- hey! Didn't I just tell you not to go there?


    And finally, here are some previous incarnations of this thread (newest to oldest):
    -- Running all your nets, winging all your exes
    -- Saving the world...
    -- Wil Wheaton's cardboard nerd-cred...
    --
    Risk Legacy is Neat...
    -- Space Alert Owns...
    -- Citadels For > 5 People...

    Forar on
    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
    Vyolyncetzeentchling
  • VyolynceVyolynce Registered User regular
    Forar wrote: »
    board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk

    Hell, even Risk has come a long way since Risk. Monopoly not so much.

    jergarmarThe MantizposhnialloZonugal
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    Vyolynce wrote: »
    Forar wrote: »
    board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk

    Hell, even Risk has come a long way since Risk. Monopoly not so much.

    It now uses credit cards removing the key attraction of the game: stuffing handfuls of paper money into your trousers.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    ElvenshaeCaptainPeacock
  • Mikey CTSMikey CTS Registered User regular
    New SUSD Podcast is available! Conversations about awkward encounters with designers at conventions and Netrunner returns.

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  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    @Forar, since you posted the thread, you should feel free to add/remove/change whatever. You should know, though, that the OP is actually THREE posts, and you just got the first one.

    When I was a child, I had a fever...
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  • GuibsGuibs Weekend Warrior Somewhere up North.Registered User regular
    Oh shiny new thread!

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  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    jergarmar wrote: »
    @Forar, since you posted the thread, you should feel free to add/remove/change whatever. You should know, though, that the OP is actually THREE posts, and you just got the first one.

    O.O

    Woooow. Well, at least I can axe my first reponse to tuck in a second. Hopefully I don't have to do much of a butcher job to fit in all three.


    Can't wait to hit up Eldritch Horror. Arkham Horror is, as has been mentioned a few times now I'm sure, a bit of a sore spot, in that I've never seen it be anything but an afternoon long effort in watching the board win. Which is rather appropriate given the source material, but if I really wanted that I could just read one of Lovecraft's tales. If we're going to spend an hour or more setting it all up and god knows how long playing it, I'd like at least a chance to win.

    If nothing else, the lack of an abundance of expansions (for now) may be the saving grace. With AH my crew always uses at least one 'big' expansion, one 'small' one, and I'm reasonably certain the decks are twice the size they start at with other odds and ends. Apparently there's even been discussion about playing it without any expansions next time, just to prove to me that it can be won by my crew. I'll believe it when I see it.

    Wish I'd had the time to justify going to Arkham Nights to try it out and snag some swag. Maybe next year.

    Edit 2: okay, had to strip out notes and a bunch of BGG urls in one of the 'get to know the regulars' sections to free up the 1200 characters over the post limit, but I managed to trim the OP down to 2 posts, but respect that the next thread iteration may do well with 3 opening posts for the free room to grow as new games come up. Luckily the original is always available (and now linked), so it isn't a big deal to go grab the originals if necessary/desired.

    Forar on
    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
    jergarmar
  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Vyolynce wrote: »
    Forar wrote: »
    board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk

    Hell, even Risk has come a long way since Risk. Monopoly not so much.

    Believe it or not, Monopoly DOES has some interesting ways to play these days. Tom Vasel really likes the "Tropical Tycoon" version. A buddy of mine likes the "Monopoly Deal Card Game" version.

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
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  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    So Roll Through the Ages: Iron Age has one of the most bizarre funding curves I've ever seen on Kicktraq. Everyone who cared ordered it in the first 3 days, and it passed over 200% funded. And for the last 20 days it's been nothing but a trickle.

    Probably doesn't help that they all went completely AWOL for BGG con. They also only now introduced a stretch goal. But they are pretty clearly treating this as a pre-order service.

  • VyolynceVyolynce Registered User regular
    jergarmar wrote: »
    Vyolynce wrote: »
    Forar wrote: »
    board games have come a long way since Monopoly and Risk

    Hell, even Risk has come a long way since Risk. Monopoly not so much.

    Believe it or not, Monopoly DOES has some interesting ways to play these days. Tom Vasel really likes the "Tropical Tycoon" version. A buddy of mine likes the "Monopoly Deal Card Game" version.

    But is it still Monopoly at its core like Risk: Legacy is still Risk? Because that's most of the problem, honestly. Monopoly spin-offs are often more than fine.

  • EndaroEndaro Registered User regular
    Coup sounds intriguing, sounds very similar to Masquerade. Is it worth having both?

    I should probably wait until I finally get Love Letter to the table though. I picked up the Japanese edition under the store owners recommendation because of supposed limited edition promo cards and both versions were equally priced. Now that I've opened it, I really regret not picking up the other version. The art is far worse, the unique promo cards are laughable, and I think the gameplay changes are greatly to it's detriment.

  • PMAversPMAvers Registered User regular
    Endaro wrote: »
    Coup sounds intriguing, sounds very similar to Masquerade. Is it worth having both?

    Probably, since Coup is best 4-5 players, and Masquerade is 6+.

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  • Mikey CTSMikey CTS Registered User regular
    Uh I'm pretty sure Mascarade is 4-12 players.

    // PSN: wyrd_warrior // MHW Name: Josei //
  • PMAversPMAvers Registered User regular
    Right, I mean "best" 6+.

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    Mikey CTS
  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    Hey board game thread.

    I'm going shopping for new games in TWO HOURS. My group already has a big collection of games, most of the classics and big names, so I'm looking for any interesting or more obscure new hotness suggestions.

    On my list are Cyclades, Letters to Whitechapel, and Archipelago.

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • DarkPrimusDarkPrimus Registered User regular
    Whatever you're planning on getting, forget it. Just spend all the money on X-Wing.

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    Gamertag: PrimusD | Rock Band DLC | GW:OttW - arrcd | WLD - Thortar
    Elvenshae
  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    Personally I'd pass on Cyclades. It's just...meh. I've heard great things about Kemet though.

  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    DarkPrimus wrote: »
    Whatever you're planning on getting, forget it. Just spend all the money on X-Wing.

    Star Trek: Attack Wing is the more "obscure" version of the X-Wing system... which makes it automatically better. Only those smart enough etc etc etc.

    Seriously, though, it's hard to get more "interesting" than Archipelago. By all accounts and my personal experience, it feels a LOT different than just about anything.

    When I was a child, I had a fever...
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  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    Kemet is absolutely fantastic. A friend of mine owns it and is a distillation of combat-based board games to their purest, most murderous fundamentals.

    I've heard Cyclades is quite good in a different way, though I disapprove of dice-based combat. What makes it meh?

    As for Archipelago, I love how it sounds, but the victory conditions don't seem very clear - is it possible for one player to win who isn't the sympathizer/traitor, or is it always a cooperative game for the other players (or everyone, if he's not in the game)? I thought it was an economy-management VP race, but some reviews have made it sound like something else.

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • Mikey CTSMikey CTS Registered User regular
    edited December 2013
    I own and love Cyclades. One of the most satisfying experiences I've had boardgaming was sending the Kraken to murder six of my brothers ships. Good times.

    Mikey CTS on
    // PSN: wyrd_warrior // MHW Name: Josei //
  • jergarmarjergarmar inside your hollow manRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Kemet is absolutely fantastic. A friend of mine owns it and is a distillation of combat-based board games to their purest, most murderous fundamentals.

    I've heard Cyclades is quite good in a different way, though I disapprove of dice-based combat. What makes it meh?

    As for Archipelago, I love how it sounds, but the victory conditions don't seem very clear - is it possible for one player to win who isn't the sympathizer/traitor, or is it always a cooperative game for the other players (or everyone, if he's not in the game)? I thought it was an economy-management VP race, but some reviews have made it sound like something else.

    Archipelago is NEVER cooperative, really. It's just that everybody can lose. Think CitOW. And it's NOT mainly about economy-management, because the victory conditions are wildly different from game to game. One time the VPs come from building cities, another time it's exploration tokens. You have to suss out what gives points from the other players, while working on your own goal card, while also obfuscating it from everyone else. So it's part bluffing, part negotiation, part economy, part hidden traitor.

    jergarmar on
    When I was a child, I had a fever...
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  • BogartBogart I Will Cure You Registered User, Moderator mod
    Hey board game thread.

    I'm going shopping for new games in TWO HOURS. My group already has a big collection of games, most of the classics and big names, so I'm looking for any interesting or more obscure new hotness suggestions.

    On my list are Cyclades, Letters to Whitechapel, and Archipelago.

    @Evil Multifarious If you have six, seven or eight regulars get Space Cadets: Dice Duels. Fast, funny, exciting and is one of the few games to be team vs team. Also different roles offer different experiences, so you can play four games and never be playing the same game twice.

  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Cyclades just had issues with my group. It just broke. Someone on BGG would probably accuse us of playing it "wrong". It basically boiled down to 2 player games being flat out broken. Within 3 turns one player consistently boxed out the other, and there was nothing they could do. 3 player games were also pretty fucked since we quickly discovered that all one player has to do is let himself get boxed into one island, then hoard. The other two players will have no choice but to keep each other in an extremely careful balance. Then the turtle player busts out with an indomitable warchest and wins the game. With 4 or 5 players the game would just...end? Just when we felt like the game was really getting going, someone would just suddenly have 2 metropolises and win.

    Maybe if we played it a lot more we'd have found solutions to these problems. We could have learned the strategy to a 2 player game better, so that an auto-win doesn't happen. We could avoid knocking a player back to a single island in a 3 player game, disallowing the turtle catchup abuse strategy. In a 4+ player game we could better pay attention to everyone's avenues towards victory. But the game was just so consistently underwhelming for the first 6 or 7 plays, no one wanted to put that effort in. Not when we owned Chaos in the Old World, and enjoyed it so very much more.

    Namrok on
  • Bear is DrivingBear is Driving Registered User regular
    edited December 2013
    PMAvers wrote: »
    Endaro wrote: »
    Coup sounds intriguing, sounds very similar to Masquerade. Is it worth having both?

    Probably, since Coup is best 4-5 players, and Masquerade is 6+.

    Just a quick addition if anyone is worried: Coup plays totally fine with 6. That's how we usually play it actually, as a spiteful nightcap after AGOT or something - in case people didn't hate each other enough (the game night I host is called "You're Not Here To Make Friends").

    Bear is Driving on
    tzeentchling
  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    jergarmar wrote: »
    Kemet is absolutely fantastic. A friend of mine owns it and is a distillation of combat-based board games to their purest, most murderous fundamentals.

    I've heard Cyclades is quite good in a different way, though I disapprove of dice-based combat. What makes it meh?

    As for Archipelago, I love how it sounds, but the victory conditions don't seem very clear - is it possible for one player to win who isn't the sympathizer/traitor, or is it always a cooperative game for the other players (or everyone, if he's not in the game)? I thought it was an economy-management VP race, but some reviews have made it sound like something else.

    Archipelago is NEVER cooperative, really. It's just that everybody can lose. Think CitOW. And it's NOT mainly about economy-management, because the victory conditions are wildly different from game to game. One time the VPs come from building cities, another time it's exploration tokens. You have to suss out what gives points from the other players, while working on your own goal card, while also obfuscating it from everyone else. So it's part bluffing, part negotiation, part economy, part hidden traitor.

    ...hhhnnnggghhhh

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • poshnialloposhniallo Registered User regular
    jergarmar wrote: »
    Kemet is absolutely fantastic. A friend of mine owns it and is a distillation of combat-based board games to their purest, most murderous fundamentals.

    I've heard Cyclades is quite good in a different way, though I disapprove of dice-based combat. What makes it meh?

    As for Archipelago, I love how it sounds, but the victory conditions don't seem very clear - is it possible for one player to win who isn't the sympathizer/traitor, or is it always a cooperative game for the other players (or everyone, if he's not in the game)? I thought it was an economy-management VP race, but some reviews have made it sound like something else.

    Archipelago is NEVER cooperative, really. It's just that everybody can lose. Think CitOW. And it's NOT mainly about economy-management, because the victory conditions are wildly different from game to game. One time the VPs come from building cities, another time it's exploration tokens. You have to suss out what gives points from the other players, while working on your own goal card, while also obfuscating it from everyone else. So it's part bluffing, part negotiation, part economy, part hidden traitor.

    ...hhhnnnggghhhh

    I love it, and a lot of people have been very impressed with it at our game group.

    Cyclades I love too, and I win a fair bit, and I almost never roll dice. There are multiple routes to victory, and mine has been the political/geographical - positioning us so that 'Let's you and him fight' happens a lot, and then thinking Really Hard about the auctions. It has multiple routes to victory, and is just always good.

    I figure I could take a bear.
  • FishmanFishman Long time gone, Constantinople Registered User regular
    I love Archipelago so much. It's enjoyability more than makes up for it's relatively minor flaws. My biggest problem is that games night occurs after hours on a work night, so there isn't enough time to play a long-form full game.

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  • GoodOmensGoodOmens Registered User regular
    I had the opportunity to play Lost Legends over the weekend. 7 Wonders-esque card drafting where the cards represent weapons, armor and other fantasy what-not. Draft some cards, use the stuff you accumulated to go kill monsters or, just as likely, get your head caved in by them. It's definitely not as strategic as 7W because you don't know what monsters you'll end up facing (though there are some ways to control that), but it was good fun. And I actually managed to win!

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  • ArcSynArcSyn Registered User regular
    My secret santa from the GnT subforum got me the Paint the Line ECG! My wife is working tonight but I'm gonna try a few solo games so I can explain it to her when we play.
    The d20 is pretty poorly made (some of the numbers are shallow/missing paint making them hard to read), but I've got bags of dice I can use, but none white/orange. May need to find a nice one online. :D

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  • ehronlimeehronlime Southbank, Melbourne, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    Has anyone else been playing the iOS version of Lords of Waterdeep? I've racked up quite a few offline plays since I'm out of town for work and far away from my other games.

    I feel like the AI gets a bit weird sometimes. In the first 10 or so games, I never received any of the side benefits of Intrigue cards. Might have just been weird run of luck, but I imagined the AIs were conspiring against me, heh. Then yesterday, while I was about 15 points behind everyone else, I got slammed with 3 consecutive Mandatory Quests. Now I'm convinced the AIs are out to get me...

    (I did have both a 20 pt and a 25 pt quest almost ready to go, so I don't doubt the logic behind the moves. Just thought it was pretty funny.)

    My boardgames: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/collection/user/ehron
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  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    So I got to play a bunch of Coup tonight. That was a lot of fun. But we only played it with 3 players, and 2 of us were super honest. I can imagine all the more fun we'll have with more players, and more liars. And alcohol will help too.

    We also played 3 games of Forbidden Desert, and a game of Eminent Domain. Forbidden Desert is pretty badass on Elite or Legendary. We almost squeaked a win on Elite. Had all the parts, was running for the hangar. Then the last card of the last turn we needed to get through used up the last sand token. End game. Oh well. Also, Eminent Domain just keeps growing on me. I was this close to trading it away between Core Worlds and Race for the Galaxy. But it's just so damn good, in its own way. I feel good about having decided to keep all three. If only I could get Race to the Galaxy back to the table.

  • lowlylowlycooklowlylowlycook Registered User regular
    [Finds the right thread]

    Now that GameZone has pulled their HeroQuest Kickstarter, the next thing they should do is contact to people behind Super Fantasy: Ugly Snouts Assault and arrange a joint Kickstarter for a Deluxe Edition with miniatures. Probably should get a better subtitle too.

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    (Please do not gift. My game bank is already full.)
    caliber
  • Mikey CTSMikey CTS Registered User regular
    edited December 2013
    @IronWeasel So they ran a Kickstarter for a new print run of Alien Frontiers with specialized rocket-shaped dice add-on.

    19881bd6668e491ba1da1acd890cbbde_large.jpg?1365294400

    It's apparently taken longer to manufacture these dice than they projected. So rather than pay seperate shipping for the base game and the dice, they delayed the base game to the new completion date of the dice. Which I believe is in February. Even if you did not order the stupid-butt rocket dice. As you can imagine, a lot of people are angry.

    Mikey CTS on
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  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    [Finds the right thread]

    Now that GameZone has pulled their HeroQuest Kickstarter, the next thing they should do is contact to people behind Super Fantasy: Ugly Snouts Assault and arrange a joint Kickstarter for a Deluxe Edition with miniatures. Probably should get a better subtitle too.

    I want more info on this. What happened, HeroQuest was completely canned?

    What is this I don't even.
  • lowlylowlycooklowlylowlycook Registered User regular
    Apparently this got sent to backers (I got it from the reaper forums):
    Dear Backers
    Last Friday we were surprised by the pause placed on our kickstarter Project of HQ25. We wrote a communiqué to you, which was also posted on our site heroquestclassic.com. In our letter we tried to communicate to you in the clearest fashion what was happening and as well to share with you all, our petition to kickstarter to have the project reopened. To do all of this publicly was to us the correct way for you as our backers to be informed of the situation and the most correct and transparent way to communicate with you as well, as our backers you have the right to know what was going on with this project.
    We have done what you have ask for, we have waited in silence for KS’ answer. It has arrived. KS would prefer to keep the project on hold and wait for us to come to an agreement with third part.
    The KS answer can be seen at our site.
    KS’ position does not agree with as at all. The situation produced by the pause of the project has been harmful.
    We do not feel that our legitimate rights over the Trademark have been protected and above all we do not wish to do business with third part under threats or duress of any sort. As a result we are proceeding to solicit KS to cancel our project on their platform.
    Is this the end of HQ25? Of course not! Keep reading!
    We accept the all of the respectful critics that has come our way because we learn from these things and if someone thinks differently they are free to express those opinions. What we do not accept is the disinformation y distortions that have been happening during the project's pause on KS in which we have remained silent and waited.
    During these past few days our creative design crew has still been working on the development of various components, the same as always, the idea being to not lose any energy with this controversy.
    The thirteen on the gallows, as we have fondly started calling the 13 professionals that are implicated in the creation of the project, have as a priority the development of this commemorative game.
    We are truly more worried about you, the backers. We want thank you for the messages of support that have been rolling in. The public reaction to the news of a new edition of this classic provided undeniable and sincere joy to many. We will hold onto this as the rout to follow.
    After this communiqué is sent out we will proceed to ask KS to cancel the project on their platform. After this is done we will immediately restart and continue the HQ25 project. More info at heroquestclassic.com tomorrow. Therefore the HQ25 project will return to active status. We will move from victims to survivors and conquer as we go.
    We understand that KS has a larger public base than any other crowed funding platform today; we understand that moving the project to another site will mean that out backer support will decrease. However we are ready and willing to continue this campaign in a place that will offer us the correct guaranties for our trademark. We would prefer to raise fewer funds and still move forward with and produce it in time for the 25th anniversary.
    We await your support and enthusiasm in this renewed crowed funding campaign.
    Again, we would like to thank our backers from the bottom of our hearts, please do not regret supporting us. Let us all together get this back on track and make this dream a reality.
    Gamezone

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    (Please do not gift. My game bank is already full.)
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    MAN, those guys seem super shady.

    What is this I don't even.
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Sounds like Gamezone also still didn't have Hasbro's permission to use THEIR IP and were refusing to license the Heroquest name from the current Trademark owner in the U.S. (Which is a different game, but still the trademark.)

    This Spanish company is just running rogue as a bunch of rookies and refusing to do things legally, hoping the kickstarter money will smooth things over. With a decent chance, I'd imagine, that after the kickstarter money went through everyone might be SOL.
    The trademark “Heroquest” is registered by Francis Greg Stafford with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (Registration Number 4082281) for use in game book manuals. Moon Design Publications LLC has the exclusive license for use of that trademark. For some time now we have been working on creating a board game called “Heroquest” pertaining to the mythology of Glorantha and an updated version of our Heroquest roleplaying game.

    The project by Gamezone, a Spanish game company, proposes to remake a role-playing/board game originally produced by Milton Bradley and Games Workshop in 1989. The project calls their game “Heroquest” which is identical to our registered mark and easily confused with it.

    Gamezone initially asked us for use of the Heroquest trademark on July 31, 2013. The next day we asked them if they could provide us with a copy of any written agreement with Hasbro to produce a 25th Anniversary Edition of Hasbro’s board game. Gamezone did not provide us with any written confirmation (and as of this date still has not done so). On August 26, 2013, we informed Gamezone by email that we must decline their request.

    Despite being explicitly refused permission to use our trademark, Gamezone went ahead and launched this Kickstarter. As a New York State corporation, Kickstarter is subject to US trademark laws and the use of our trademark in the campaign was a violation of those laws.We told Gamezone that they needed to immediately get a licensing agreement from us (which, among other things, would require that they pay us for the rights to the name since it would mean foregoing our opportunity to release our game using our trademark and to compensate us for that lost revenue).

    Gamezone did not get back to us within the period we set, and rather than have this end up in litigation (which could also bring in other parties with IP at stake), we asked Kickstarter to suspend the campaign. We then spoke to Gamezone informing them that we had certain non-negotiable demands for any license agreement, among them a statement that Gamezone has explicit permission from Hasbro to make this game based on their IP. Gamezone has assured us that they can get such permission, but until we see confirmation, we cannot responsibly license our trademark to be used in this Kickstarter campaign.

    http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1079761/moon-design-publications-official-statement-on-gam

    Darkewolfe on
    What is this I don't even.
  • NamrokNamrok Herndon, VARegistered User regular
    Honestly, it sounds like Moon Design saved a bunch of people from being taken for a ride. Hasbro or Games Workshop would have likely waiting until the project was funded and some ways down the line before acting legally. Apparently that's their MO according to legal "experts" on BGG? Whatever.

    I'm glad someone challenged it now and sort of won than lots of people being out $200+ each. I wanted to believe in that project so bad. But it seemed so fucking shady. It was gonna turn into another Valley Games episode.

    DarkewolfeCantide
  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Gotta agree. I've got a copy of the original HQ in the den, and it comes out to be played once in a while to this day.

    Oh well, hopefully seeing them raise half a million in a couple days will spur someone to get it done properly. And it's not like there aren't also a dozen different options available for similar gameplay out there now.

    I know it didn't wow a lot of people, and there's some reluctance based on Flying Frog's other offerings, but my crew is eagerly awaiting Shadows of Brimstone. Obviously a wildly different setting (Malifaux meets Rifts as a dungeon crawler boardgame is how I'm thinking of it) but solo to 6 player co-op with a simply crazy amount of expansion material ought to keep us busy for years.

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
  • Bear is DrivingBear is Driving Registered User regular
    Namrok wrote: »
    So I got to play a bunch of Coup tonight. That was a lot of fun. But we only played it with 3 players, and 2 of us were super honest. I can imagine all the more fun we'll have with more players, and more liars. And alcohol will help too.

    You don't have to lie per se but you do need to double bluff and act like you're lying constantly so other people end up killing themselves trying to call you on your perfectly legitimate shenanigans. I've found the more I protest that I never lie the more people think I always lie.

    Not that it matters, as the owner of the game I have to die at least second or third after the previous round's winner.

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