DyasAlure - My art thread

DyasAlureDyasAlure SeattleRegistered User regular
edited December 2013 in Artist's Corner
So, I have been out of art for a long time. I don't think I will be doing new things for a while. After this month maybe, but I wanted to share a journal I have just scanned. I only have two images ready to view, they scanned as PDF. I tried to fix color just a little, but old, bad scan isn't the best. But here you go:

Thy%20Hair%20Thy%20Lips%20Thumb.jpg?psid=1
Face%20and%20Random%20Thumb.jpg?psid=1

My%20Steam.png?psid=1My%20Twitch%20-%20Mass%20Effect.png?psid=1=1My%20Youtube.png?psid=1
DyasAlure on

Posts

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Those images are huge, bro. You need to grab a program to re-size them before you post them.

  • DyasAlureDyasAlure SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Sorry, I made them smaller and link to big size if you want. What is preferred size? Is that small enough?

    Edit:
    And trying to help out. I'm new to showing my art.
    Tell us what your goals as an artist are.
    Ok, I would like it to be a hobby. I enjoyed it in high school and college. I don't plan on making money on it, but do want to expand my art. I do Photoshop, illustrator, and have done line drawing in past as these. I love these types of drawings. I don't know if people consider them art, but I enjoy making them.

    Are you a hobbyist looking to learn to draw landscapes for fun?
    I would like to make cartoons. I hope to use illustrator, but I wanted to start with things I have done so you can see what I have done in the past.
    Are you putting together a portfolio to get into art school?
    Nope, but I'm thinking of putting together some kind of web page thing. I don't know what to do there.
    Are you currently a professional looking to further refine your skills in a certain area?
    Nope.
    How long have you been practicing this form of art?
    I have been playing with illustrator for a year. I have played with Photoshop art since 1996. The drawings I am posting now I started doodeling around 1996. I have picked up and done more off and on since than.
    Who are some artists or styles that you admire who you strive to be like in your own work?
    I like David Willis (dumbing of age) & Tim Buckley (Ctrl+Alt+del).

    I hope this helps you direct my stuff. I'm going to keep adding them as I get them scanned and stuff. I can start adding some of my illustrator stuff after that.

    DyasAlure on
    My%20Steam.png?psid=1My%20Twitch%20-%20Mass%20Effect.png?psid=1=1My%20Youtube.png?psid=1
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Being a hobbyist is sort of a tricky thing in drawing. Its sort of like being a hobbyist car mechanic. There is a level that is easy to get to where you can do a few things that maybe your average driver cant, like change the oil, or replace a tire. There comes a point where you get to something more difficult, something under the chassis, and you need to make a choice. Are you going to buy a jack that is nice and sturdy, learn about all the shit under your car, and just go for it? Or would you rather be a guy that just changes his own oil?

    The reason that I am presenting you with this analogy is that, if you are going to stay at that oil change level, you really dont need any help. Those geometric drawings are kinda fun, and are probably satisfying your urge to be creative. Once you get to "I want to draw cartoons" You are in a whole new realm of commitment. There is a pretty defined path of learning how to get those fundamentals in drawing, and it is a longer, tedious road that requires time. You'll need to buy a Jack and get under the chassis, because thats where stuff like anatomy, form, and light are. If you need help taking the first steps, we can guide you along, but people are going to probably push you in the same direction that we do for people who want to be the greatest artist ever. That's just because, in the end, you'll need/want the same foundation to really get working results.

    You could, conceivably, just copy cartoons you see until you have a sort of workable solution. You are going to want to look at stuff like the character construction enrichment, and maybe look at John K's blog. Even for a hobbyist I would recommend still life drawing, to work at your observation. So its all up to you where you want to take it.

    Angel_of_BaconDasUberEdwardtynictapeslingerkevindee
  • DyasAlureDyasAlure SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited December 2013
    Iruka wrote: »
    Being a hobbyist is sort of a tricky thing in drawing. Its sort of like being a hobbyist car mechanic. There is a level that is easy to get to where you can do a few things that maybe your average driver cant, like change the oil, or replace a tire. There comes a point where you get to something more difficult, something under the chassis, and you need to make a choice. Are you going to buy a jack that is nice and sturdy, learn about all the shit under your car, and just go for it? Or would you rather be a guy that just changes his own oil?

    The reason that I am presenting you with this analogy is that, if you are going to stay at that oil change level, you really dont need any help. Those geometric drawings are kinda fun, and are probably satisfying your urge to be creative. Once you get to "I want to draw cartoons" You are in a whole new realm of commitment. There is a pretty defined path of learning how to get those fundamentals in drawing, and it is a longer, tedious road that requires time. You'll need to buy a Jack and get under the chassis, because thats where stuff like anatomy, form, and light are. If you need help taking the first steps, we can guide you along, but people are going to probably push you in the same direction that we do for people who want to be the greatest artist ever. That's just because, in the end, you'll need/want the same foundation to really get working results.

    You could, conceivably, just copy cartoons you see until you have a sort of workable solution. You are going to want to look at stuff like the character construction enrichment, and maybe look at John K's blog. Even for a hobbyist I would recommend still life drawing, to work at your observation. So its all up to you where you want to take it.

    Thank you for reply. I guess I want to be a little above hobby. I have great ideas (I think) for short little stories. I don't have a desire to write though. I enjoy graphic arts. I have done a few things for small businesses, but not much. So yeah, I guess I would like to do a little more than hobby. I am not looking to make a living this way. But than maybe I will surprise myself and end up with a following. I want to get a site to post my cartoons and share at some point. I love sharing. :)

    I will look at that thread. I do not know who John K is? Also, I can draw Garfield, so I did imitate one cartoon a long time ago. I didn't get far on that. I also learned to draw Ed from the lion king, so I can try and imitate some for practice.

    Thank you again for your reply.

    Edit:
    I just saw the link to John's blog. Oh, and also, how much do I need to learn real life if I want cartoon? I don't want real life.

    DyasAlure on
    My%20Steam.png?psid=1My%20Twitch%20-%20Mass%20Effect.png?psid=1=1My%20Youtube.png?psid=1
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    If you want to be able to tackle cartoons, I would at least say that you should be able to tackle a basic still life. You need to learn the same concepts as a "realistic" artist would learn. Light, form, perspective, and shape. You'd want to get into these studies http://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/172670/feb-monthly-enrichment-simple-shapes-light-and-form and try setting up a still life and drawing from life. There is no short cut around that, really.

    Doing things like copying Garfield will only get you so far, depending on how you are doing it. If you are just using graph paper and copying it square by square, for instance, you aren't actually learning how to draw Garfield. That's sort of being like a glorified scanner/printer, you are just taking the information from one place and putting it in another.

    If I were to use the car analogy, It would be like if you managed to completely recreate the outside of a car with out anything in it. It would look fine, but you didn't learn anything about the guts, and the car wouldn't work. You couldn't take your shell car and build a whole new one from the ground up.

    You aren't going to be able to avoid the technical stuff. You'll be much happier with your results if you embrace that fact.

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