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Shower/Tub Caulking Question

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Posts

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I'd say if you went with a claw tub, greenboard is fine since you're not against the wall, otherwise concrete board, but that only doubles the drywall costs, tbh, maybe not even that much because you're not concrete boarding the whole bathroom... I mean you can if you want but that's crazy.

    Ladies.
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    Ha. I don't think there will be much doing it myself. I seriously just don't have time between work and school and the kid. I am definitely getting quotes from other places, though. That will also include "what if I rip the wall out myself", because I'm pretty sure I can remove the caulk and pull it out without fucking anything up or wasting more time than I have.

    I've already talked to homeowners insurance. They'll pay to repair the actual damage, but not to fix the actual problem... it's stupid. And I have a $1000 deductible, so for the $1500, insurance is useless. And just to be clear, that $1500 included repairing ceiling damage because they were already out there for a leak. I do think they either misdiagnosed the source of the leak or there were actually 2 leaks.

    Yes, that $1500 is high as well, honestly. I was fine with that. I needed shit done, I needed it done now, I didn't feel like fucking around, and I knew I was paying a premium there. If the house is going to keep falling apart I am going to have to drop that attitude, though. I can afford to be that way over a few hundred bucks every couple of years, not over thousands of dollars every few months. All the shit you see wrong there with the tub mounted wrong, the giant hole for the plumbing, missing shit, etc. was not them. That was done before I even owned the house. They cut two holes in the ceiling, replaced a bit of plumbing, replaced a flaky shut off valve as long as I had them there anyway, and were going to patch the ceiling back up except it's still leaking.

    I may fight them some on the $1500 from the point of "you said you'd fix it, it's not fixed. That's a lot of money to spend on not fixed.", but they did no extra damage or anything.

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    I can understand not going clawfoot, as if it's an alcove setup you're looking at either major wall mods to make it work right or the creation of a really hard to clean space. I mean, if the tub isn't leaking and you just need to fix the plumbing, that's a decently quick and non-invasive job.
    Ripping up the floor could get you into all kinds of new trouble though, as you may find something like I did - vinyl tile covering plywood that's nailed and glued to 100 year old hardwood on top of a too-thin subfloor. Then you're into a new subfloor, trim adjustments, leveling and a whole host of other things that are pains in the ass.
    I mean, if you're planning on redoing stuff anyway, it's a good impetus, but if you just want a functional bathroom, fix what's broken and do it another time.

    bowenzepherin
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    I can understand not going clawfoot, as if it's an alcove setup you're looking at either major wall mods to make it work right or the creation of a really hard to clean space. I mean, if the tub isn't leaking and you just need to fix the plumbing, that's a decently quick and non-invasive job.
    Ripping up the floor could get you into all kinds of new trouble though, as you may find something like I did - vinyl tile covering plywood that's nailed and glued to 100 year old hardwood on top of a too-thin subfloor. Then you're into a new subfloor, trim adjustments, leveling and a whole host of other things that are pains in the ass.
    I mean, if you're planning on redoing stuff anyway, it's a good impetus, but if you just want a functional bathroom, fix what's broken and do it another time.
    Yeah, I've never opened up a wall, floor or ceiling and said. "That is what I like to see. Everything is doing great here." Usually when I open a wall my frown is frowning.

    Essee
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    I can understand not going clawfoot, as if it's an alcove setup you're looking at either major wall mods to make it work right or the creation of a really hard to clean space. I mean, if the tub isn't leaking and you just need to fix the plumbing, that's a decently quick and non-invasive job.
    Ripping up the floor could get you into all kinds of new trouble though, as you may find something like I did - vinyl tile covering plywood that's nailed and glued to 100 year old hardwood on top of a too-thin subfloor. Then you're into a new subfloor, trim adjustments, leveling and a whole host of other things that are pains in the ass.
    I mean, if you're planning on redoing stuff anyway, it's a good impetus, but if you just want a functional bathroom, fix what's broken and do it another time.

    Yeah, it's going to come down to
    1) What does it cost to fix the immediate problem
    2) How does that compare to the cost of replacing it all
    3) If I don't actually remove the tub and at least have it re-installed, is it likely to re-break every few years because of the tub not being mounted properly

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    schuss wrote: »
    I can understand not going clawfoot, as if it's an alcove setup you're looking at either major wall mods to make it work right or the creation of a really hard to clean space. I mean, if the tub isn't leaking and you just need to fix the plumbing, that's a decently quick and non-invasive job.
    Ripping up the floor could get you into all kinds of new trouble though, as you may find something like I did - vinyl tile covering plywood that's nailed and glued to 100 year old hardwood on top of a too-thin subfloor. Then you're into a new subfloor, trim adjustments, leveling and a whole host of other things that are pains in the ass.
    I mean, if you're planning on redoing stuff anyway, it's a good impetus, but if you just want a functional bathroom, fix what's broken and do it another time.
    Yeah, I've never opened up a wall, floor or ceiling and said. "That is what I like to see. Everything is doing great here." Usually when I open a wall my frown is frowning.

    It's incredibly to see the kind of corners people will cut to save like $20.

    Ladies.
    zepherincabsyEssee
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    schuss wrote: »
    I can understand not going clawfoot, as if it's an alcove setup you're looking at either major wall mods to make it work right or the creation of a really hard to clean space. I mean, if the tub isn't leaking and you just need to fix the plumbing, that's a decently quick and non-invasive job.
    Ripping up the floor could get you into all kinds of new trouble though, as you may find something like I did - vinyl tile covering plywood that's nailed and glued to 100 year old hardwood on top of a too-thin subfloor. Then you're into a new subfloor, trim adjustments, leveling and a whole host of other things that are pains in the ass.
    I mean, if you're planning on redoing stuff anyway, it's a good impetus, but if you just want a functional bathroom, fix what's broken and do it another time.
    Yeah, I've never opened up a wall, floor or ceiling and said. "That is what I like to see. Everything is doing great here." Usually when I open a wall my frown is frowning.

    Exactly. I just noted that he stated he had kids and a busy schedule, so sometimes you band-aid with a ~2 weekend job until a more suitable time, as the materials for this would be minimal in cost vs. full replacements. The purist in me says "do it right", but reality is a bitch.

    bowenzepherinEssee
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    edited February 2014
    At the advice of a friend I pulled the shower head and arm out to check for the pipe back there being cracked. I tried to get pictures. I can't tell if this is a possible crack or just normal casting imperfections.
    showerarmconnection2_zps9b3f4174.jpg
    showerarmconnection1_zps7c691158.jpg

    Jimmy King on
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Looks like a molding line.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Looks like the seal on that might have been really bad, either the caulk or tape (can't tell which) was barely used?

    Ladies.
    schuss
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    Yeah, I retaped that shit up to be safe and stuck it all back together. I have "found" the problem, the plumber was semi-right, but I still don't believe I need $7k worth of tub/shower. It definitely is only leaking when I stand in the shower. I'm not sure if that's because of my weight shifting the tub down and creating a crack for water to sneak through or if it's always there and water only makes it to the crack by bouncing off of/around me.

    In any case, water is definitely getting back into the lip behind the tub. That is filling up and then it is overflowing. I'm waiting on some input from my father in law's friend - they are all old rednecks who have done large parts of building houses themselves. Pending his input, my current plan is to remove the caulking from that seam between the tub and shower wall and re-caulk (using proper tub caulk like ge silicone II, which is what was used before as well) with the tub full. The top of the shower wall has already been re-caulked and it doesn't get that much water on it. I'm not sure I had the tub full of water when I last re-caulked that seam, though, and caulking with it full would allow me to caulk for when it is shifted down already. Then I'll test it to make sure it seems to be properly sealed. If it is, I'll have that ceiling patched back up. Due to the angling of the tub/floor, all of the water dumps out of one corner of the lip, so I'll stick a bucket or bowl underneath that and just have to look under there regularly until I'm sure it's not pulling back apart.

    Assuming it seals back up properly, even if it does slowly pull back apart that should give me time to figure out what I really need/want to do, get more quotes for doing that, and sort out finances rather than rush into a repair job that every person I've talked to says is way too expensive.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    If it's the lib around the tub that joins to the wall, yeah, caulk that shit right up.

    Ladies.
    schuss
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    yeah, my best guess is that is letting water in. The tub sits kind of retarded and so one part of it has a huge gap. I wouldn't be surprised if between changes in temperature and being my first time caulking anything, my caulk job is sucking now and letting some water through. I probably need to redo it with the tub full of water so that it's heavy and shifted down already when I caulk rather than when it's empty so the caulk stretches when I stand in it.

    I figure if nothing else, this is likely to give me 4-6 months to figure out what I really want and prepare financially before it fucks up again and I decide I need to just have it all pulled out because it's seated/mounted poorly. I discovered while poking around in there this weekend that the asshole who installed the tub apparently chipped out chunks of the studs to make room for the tub because it was too big.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I think you can notch out studs so long as it doesn't compromise structure. So if it takes out more than 20% of the stud, they fucked your structure and you should look to repair it.

    Makes sense that you standing in the tub shifts it, now. Especially if it's pulling away from a wall like that.

    Ladies.
  • KakodaimonosKakodaimonos Registered User regular
    The rule of thumb is <25% on load bearing studs and <40% on non-load bearing studs. If it's engineered wood, you shouldn't do any notching.

    bowen
  • Jimmy KingJimmy King Registered User regular
    I think these were just on the non-load bearing studs. The ones on the real wall looked ok, this is just the mini-wall separating the sink and tub. Definitely not 40% knocked out of those.

    So, yeah, that's where it stands for now. Hopefully tonight I'll have time to remove the old caulk, may let it sit overnight to dry out more, then recaulk, let it sit again, etc.

  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    0could you also just shim the tub up where its sagging to keep it from sagging, at least until you do a reno

    camo_sig.png
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    mts wrote: »
    0could you also just shim the tub up where its sagging to keep it from sagging, at least until you do a reno

    Or pour some mortar mix underneath it. That's what I used to set my shower base.

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