Submited wrong GPA to prospect employer, now what?

hulk007hulk007 Registered User new member
i went to a community college before I transferred to a University. I always kept track of all my classes and grades on an excel spreadsheet so as soon as I graduated I knew my GPA before the official transcripts came out. Anyway, I got an interview and was asked what my GPA was. I told them my calculated GPA. They asked for a transcript so I had the university send them my official transcript. Turns out not all classes were transferred from the community college to the university and my GPA ended up being o.2 less then what I originally told the hiring manager. The hiring manager has not received the transcripts yet, my question is, what do I do? I do not want to make it seem like I lied or fudged my gpa, it was an honest weighing error on my part. any input would be greatly appreciated.

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  • _J__J_ Pedant Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Contacting the manager, and explaining the situation, seems like a sensible thing to do.

    For future reference, though, it is always best to utilize official transcripts rather than self-calculated ones. Usually, a university gives students access to this information through their website.

    SkeithKetBraAl_watEncLostNinjaCambiataYoSoyTheWalruszagdrob
  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    You don't have to tell him how the mistake occurred, just let him know, apologize for the error, and let it go.

    YoSoyTheWalrus
  • Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    edited January 2014
    send a short concise email that effectively says "oops! I just realized I initially gave you an incorrect GPA - the correct value is X.X. My transcripts will verify this. Thanks!"

    its probably not even a big deal, but sending an email (or making a phone call, whatever) is probably a good idea.

    Al_wat on
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  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Definitely email the guy, admit the mistake and do it now.

    Actually having somebody admit a mistake voluntarily is a positive to me in a job applicant. It shows they care about things being right and don't have a problem with admitting errors. These are positives in pretty much any workplace.

    CelestialBadgerDaenrisSkeithYoSoyTheWalrus
  • lessthanpilessthanpi Registered User regular
    Based on the hiring teams I've been a part of no one even cares about gpa. They just want to see a degree.

    Metalbournezagdrob
  • msuroomsuroo Registered User regular
    lessthanpi wrote: »
    Based on the hiring teams I've been a part of no one even cares about gpa. They just want to see a degree.

    I think this is true in a lot of cases (at a certain point, everyone I know stopped putting it on their resume), but if you are asked in an interview what your GPA is, and are further asked for an official transcript, it's fair to assume they are looking at it. Best to straighten the situation up before being caught in a discrepancy.

  • RendRend Registered User regular
    msuroo wrote: »
    lessthanpi wrote: »
    Based on the hiring teams I've been a part of no one even cares about gpa. They just want to see a degree.

    I think this is true in a lot of cases (at a certain point, everyone I know stopped putting it on their resume), but if you are asked in an interview what your GPA is, and are further asked for an official transcript, it's fair to assume they are looking at it. Best to straighten the situation up before being caught in a discrepancy.

    Yes. In some fields, and for some companies, GPA is absolutely a determiner.

    So, definitely email your contact immediately. You don't have to go into detail unless asked. One of the most important things I've learned professionally is to know when to shut up.

    Admitting your failures is fine. Everyone makes mistakes. Detailing them unsolicited can draw too much attention to them, and cause people to make judgments you don't want them to, even if it was a perfectly reasonable mistake.

  • Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    Just send them a note saying that you made an error calculating your GPA, and that the final transcript they were forwarded is correct. More detail than that is unnecessary, and frankly it'd be sort of weird if they asked

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