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Turnabout [Chat]

19495969799

Posts

  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I don't think I've ever fully grasped what SAT scores mean, or what is being scored

    vocabulary, grammar, algebra, and maybe some other secondary school mathematics

    So like, how many exams is it? Do you do anything subject specific? Also wiki seems to suggest they're all multiple choice.

    When i took it the SAT was a 2 part exam, and each exam may have been several parts (I don't remember). You receive a verbal score and a math score. They've added a writing section since then, but they're either discussing removing it or they've decided to do so.

    Nothing subject specific. There are subject specific exams called the SAT 2 exams, but they're much less prevalent.

    The verbal and math are definitely all multiple choice.

    sig.gif
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    the verbal in my day was basically two things. Reading short essays and answering questions about them and filling in ridiculous analogies that used words no human has ever actually uttered

    The Math stuff pretty much peaked at pre-calc level questions and was more about knowing geometry and algebra rules than actual computations. Like if you knew the applicable rules there was usually only one answer that made any sense

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    I suppose it's coming from a system where I did seven exams at age 14 in named subjects, each of which was a full written exam in its own right (although some had multiple choice elements), then five at 15 (which were the basis of my university application, although I carried on at school for a further year, which meant ... four more exams).

    I can't really wrap my head around a system where you apply to university without any subject specific examination.

    jakobaggerFeral
  • y2jake215y2jake215 certified Flat Birther theorist the Last Good Boy onlineRegistered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    I suppose it's coming from a system where I did seven exams at age 14 in named subjects, each of which was a full written exam in its own right (although some had multiple choice elements), then five at 15 (which were the basis of my university application, although I carried on at school for a further year, which meant ... four more exams).

    I can't really wrap my head around a system where you apply to university without any subject specific examination.

    SAT 2s are subject specific but not strictly mandatory, there are also AP exams which can be listed on transcripts etc

    C8Ft8GE.jpg
    maybe i'm streaming terrible dj right now if i am its here
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    the SAT does separate subject tests in the sciences and other things but they're hardly required unless you're going into a very specific field.

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    eeeeeeee

    13018010323_dae73768fe.jpg

    13018007313_d08da1524c.jpg

    he was so goooooooood

    Taminwandering
  • OrganichuOrganichu jacobkosh Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    I suppose it's coming from a system where I did seven exams at age 14 in named subjects, each of which was a full written exam in its own right (although some had multiple choice elements), then five at 15 (which were the basis of my university application, although I carried on at school for a further year, which meant ... four more exams).

    I can't really wrap my head around a system where you apply to university without any subject specific examination.

    whether you're required to take subject specific exams to be considered for admission to university depends, basically, on the rigorousness of the school. so getting into a state school (even a fairly renowned school like penn state university or the university of virginia) will just require the general SAT exam (and mid tier schools in other parts of the country might use an alternate exam called the ACT which similarly is a general test). i'd say probably 95% of schools only call for the generic exam (SAT or ACT, depending on region). of course, the admissions process is holistic (grades, SAT/ACT score, and as the school grows more renowned or specific in its mission, extracurricular activities, entrance essays displaying passion etc)

    however, as you get to the top end (mit, caltech, stanford, any of the ivy league schools, etc) it is also required for you to take the subject tests. this process is also holistic but it's sort of assumed that your school grades will be exemplary, your SAT/ACT scores will be at the very high end of the scale, et cetera. those things are basically a given if you're to be considered, and then you also must do well in the specific subject tests (of which there are a few) and have a great essay, great extracurricular activities etc.

    Feral
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    eeeeeeee

    [img]http://farm8.sta ticflickr.com/7443/13018010323_dae73768fe.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://farm4.stat icflickr.com/3465/13018007313_d08da1524c.jpg[/img]

    he was so goooooooood

    did he talk at all about Cosmos?

  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    Organichu wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I suppose it's coming from a system where I did seven exams at age 14 in named subjects, each of which was a full written exam in its own right (although some had multiple choice elements), then five at 15 (which were the basis of my university application, although I carried on at school for a further year, which meant ... four more exams).

    I can't really wrap my head around a system where you apply to university without any subject specific examination.

    whether you're required to take subject specific exams to be considered for admission to university depends, basically, on the rigorousness of the school. so getting into a state school (even a fairly renowned school like penn state university or the university of virginia) will just require the general SAT exam (and mid tier schools in other parts of the country might use an alternate exam called the ACT which similarly is a general test). i'd say probably 95% of schools only call for the generic exam (SAT or ACT, depending on region). of course, the admissions process is holistic (grades, SAT/ACT score, and as the school grows more renowned or specific in its mission, extracurricular activities, entrance essays displaying passion etc)

    however, as you get to the top end (mit, caltech, stanford, any of the ivy league schools, etc) it is also required for you to take the subject tests. this process is also holistic but it's sort of assumed that your school grades will be exemplary, your SAT/ACT scores will be at the very high end of the scale, et cetera. those things are basically a given if you're to be considered, and then you also must do well in the specific subject tests (of which there are a few) and have a great essay, great extracurricular activities etc.

    or your dads rich and buys a new football stadium

    jakobaggerkedinik
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    Tamin wrote: »
    eeeeeeee

    [img]http://farm8.sta ticflickr.com/7443/13018010323_dae73768fe.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://farm4.stat icflickr.com/3465/13018007313_d08da1524c.jpg[/img]

    he was so goooooooood

    did he talk at all about Cosmos?

    yep

    I guess it is going to be simultaneously released in like 150 countries, 45 languages

    obama is going to introduce the first episode

    squeee

    wanderingCorehealer
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    now the founder of AOL on entrepreneurship, and then I think I am done for the day

    I am bummed that I was up too late to see julian assange though : (

    DasUberEdward
  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    man

    i took too long to like

    do stuff outside today

    now i don't feel like going anywhere or doing anything :(

    steam_sig.png
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    also sigglesworth I think the gatorade cured my hangover, so good looking out

    So It Goes
  • ShivahnShivahn Unaware of her barrel shifter privilege Eastern coastal temptressRegistered User regular
    Organichu wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    I suppose it's coming from a system where I did seven exams at age 14 in named subjects, each of which was a full written exam in its own right (although some had multiple choice elements), then five at 15 (which were the basis of my university application, although I carried on at school for a further year, which meant ... four more exams).

    I can't really wrap my head around a system where you apply to university without any subject specific examination.

    whether you're required to take subject specific exams to be considered for admission to university depends, basically, on the rigorousness of the school. so getting into a state school (even a fairly renowned school like penn state university or the university of virginia) will just require the general SAT exam (and mid tier schools in other parts of the country might use an alternate exam called the ACT which similarly is a general test). i'd say probably 95% of schools only call for the generic exam (SAT or ACT, depending on region). of course, the admissions process is holistic (grades, SAT/ACT score, and as the school grows more renowned or specific in its mission, extracurricular activities, entrance essays displaying passion etc)

    however, as you get to the top end (mit, caltech, stanford, any of the ivy league schools, etc) it is also required for you to take the subject tests. this process is also holistic but it's sort of assumed that your school grades will be exemplary, your SAT/ACT scores will be at the very high end of the scale, et cetera. those things are basically a given if you're to be considered, and then you also must do well in the specific subject tests (of which there are a few) and have a great essay, great extracurricular activities etc.

    I think the UC system wanted subject tests, but I might be remembering wrong. And California is, in general, kind of weird.

  • ShivahnShivahn Unaware of her barrel shifter privilege Eastern coastal temptressRegistered User regular
    man

    i took too long to like

    do stuff outside today

    now i don't feel like going anywhere or doing anything :(

    There are a lot of things I need to do but I'm just like

    ugh

    A variety of ughs

    DasUberEdwardCorehealer
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    Tamin wrote: »
    eeeeeeee

    [img]http://farm8.sta ticflickr.com/7443/13018010323_dae73768fe.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://farm4.stat icflickr.com/3465/13018007313_d08da1524c.jpg[/img]

    he was so goooooooood

    did he talk at all about Cosmos?

    yep

    I guess it is going to be simultaneously released in like 150 countries, 45 languages

    obama is going to introduce the first episode

    squeee

    that's pretty impressive.

    skippydumptruck
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    it looks like my twitter was shut down for inactivity

    is that a thing?

    DasUberEdward
  • PowerpuppiesPowerpuppies Registered User regular
    At the highest level, in the us, college admissions are a crap shoot no matter how good you are.

    sig.gif
    skippydumptruck
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    Huh. The system here is basically that an institution will set their entry requirements in terms of grades in subjects studied.

    Like, for the undergraduate course I took, the entry requirements for an entrant coming from the Scottish system are four As and one B or better in Scottish Higher Grade exams, with Maths and Physics being required subjects in which grade A had been obtained, with Advanced Higher (which is an exam that becomes available if you continue at school for another year after completing the Highers) in Maths and Physics recommended, and given greater weight when considering applications.

    The other three subjects can notionally be anything but in practice the institution will tend to favour candidates having studied subjects relevant or related to the degree subject.

    James
  • OrganichuOrganichu jacobkosh Registered User regular
    At the highest level, in the us, college admissions are a crap shoot no matter how good you are.

    yeah they turn away tons of >4.0, >1500 on the SAT, all AP classes, built homes in guatemala over the summer etc kids

    just not enough spots

    and too many tiger moms

  • BeNarwhalBeNarwhal The Work Left Unfinished Registered User regular
    If things are going according to plan, my buddy should be proposing to his girlfriend as I type this <3

    He/Him
    Narwhal, you should make "Sometimes while someone is explaining something to me, I am thinking about rockets" your signature
    DasUberEdwardCorehealer
  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    it looks like my twitter was shut down for inactivity

    is that a thing?

    yessir

    happened to me.

    steam_sig.png
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    Huh. The system here is basically that an institution will set their entry requirements in terms of grades in subjects studied.

    Like, for the undergraduate course I took, the entry requirements for an entrant coming from the Scottish system are four As and one B or better in Scottish Higher Grade exams, with Maths and Physics being required subjects in which grade A had been obtained, with Advanced Higher (which is an exam that becomes available if you continue at school for another year after completing the Highers) in Maths and Physics recommended, and given greater weight when considering applications.

    The other three subjects can notionally be anything but in practice the institution will tend to favour candidates having studied subjects relevant or related to the degree subject.

    this is crazy to me

    I didn't know what I wanted to major in until I was 20 I think

    and it was probably a mistake

    I can't imagine stuff you took at 14 starting to determine what you could then take in college

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    it looks like my twitter was shut down for inactivity

    is that a thing?

    yessir

    happened to me.

    hmm

    do I make a new handle not related to this one

  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    do i want lo mein

    for dinner

    or. . .

    steam_sig.png
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    Huh. The system here is basically that an institution will set their entry requirements in terms of grades in subjects studied.

    Like, for the undergraduate course I took, the entry requirements for an entrant coming from the Scottish system are four As and one B or better in Scottish Higher Grade exams, with Maths and Physics being required subjects in which grade A had been obtained, with Advanced Higher (which is an exam that becomes available if you continue at school for another year after completing the Highers) in Maths and Physics recommended, and given greater weight when considering applications.

    The other three subjects can notionally be anything but in practice the institution will tend to favour candidates having studied subjects relevant or related to the degree subject.

    this is crazy to me

    I didn't know what I wanted to major in until I was 20 I think

    and it was probably a mistake

    I can't imagine stuff you took at 14 starting to determine what you could then take in college

    At 14 it's obvious if you're a science or an arts types. Then at 16 you've got a reasonable idea of what you enjoy are best at and your degree choice stems from that.

    And you can always change. I started out doing CS and switched to physics. All that mattered was that I had A's in Maths and Physics at A-level.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    At 14 it's obvious if you're a science or an arts types. Then at 16 you've got a reasonable idea of what you enjoy are best at and your degree choice stems from that.

    And you can always change. I started out doing CS and switched to physics. All that mattered was that I had A's in Maths and Physics at A-level.

    I dunno

    I was good at both math and language

    I probably could have gone either way

    I was a humanities type through college and (I guess) the first part of my career, I think I want to do something technical/STEM-y now

    idk

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    japan wrote: »
    Huh. The system here is basically that an institution will set their entry requirements in terms of grades in subjects studied.

    Like, for the undergraduate course I took, the entry requirements for an entrant coming from the Scottish system are four As and one B or better in Scottish Higher Grade exams, with Maths and Physics being required subjects in which grade A had been obtained, with Advanced Higher (which is an exam that becomes available if you continue at school for another year after completing the Highers) in Maths and Physics recommended, and given greater weight when considering applications.

    The other three subjects can notionally be anything but in practice the institution will tend to favour candidates having studied subjects relevant or related to the degree subject.

    this is crazy to me

    I didn't know what I wanted to major in until I was 20 I think

    and it was probably a mistake

    I can't imagine stuff you took at 14 starting to determine what you could then take in college

    The system here is very much geared around the idea that you know what you are going to university to study. Schools (in the secondary sense, not universities) will generally guide students towards subject areas where they have demonstrated an aptitude, and the subjects they study will define what a university is willing to offer them a place for.

  • y2jake215y2jake215 certified Flat Birther theorist the Last Good Boy onlineRegistered User regular
    i didn't have any idea what i wanted to do either

    i still don't

    i just followed path of least resistance every step of the way i guess

    C8Ft8GE.jpg
    maybe i'm streaming terrible dj right now if i am its here
    skippydumptruckDasUberEdwardMojo_JojoShazkar ShadowstormCorehealershalmeloBogartHappylilElfYoshisummonssurrealitycheck
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    Also in the Scottish system there is generally enough wiggle room that you can hedge your bets a bit. In the English system less so. There's nothing stopping you studying a mix of subjects and it's rare for a course to specify more than a couple of subjects as absolute requirements, and one of those will usually be English or Maths.

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    My a-levels were History, Physics, Maths and Chemistry. And I studied its of Computer Science, Psychology, Philosophy and Physics. When I was looking at PhDs the biology department was gagging for people with hard science degrees, so it's never too late to flex.

    We also only take three years to get a BSc, which is a huge bonus.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    Looks like I'm about to finish off ME3. With the classic ending.

    Hurray.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    Feralkedinik
  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    y2jake215 wrote: »
    i didn't have any idea what i wanted to do either

    i still don't

    i just followed path of least resistance every step of the way i guess

    ditto. unfortunately I ended up spending 50K in things like philosophy and ethics LOL

    steam_sig.png
    skippydumptruck
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    In America, people go to college as a status symbol first, to learn something second. As a freshman, I dithered around undeclared taking a wide variety of classes my first year.

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    My Highers were English, Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Computing. But I also did a sixth year and picked up Higher Philosophy and CSYS (which is an old qualification, it's now called Advanced Higher) Physics and Maths.

  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck (♡°◡°) Registered User regular
    y2jake215 wrote: »
    i didn't have any idea what i wanted to do either

    i still don't

    i just followed path of least resistance every step of the way i guess

    I don't think that's anything to be ashamed of, really

    if you don't have a destination, anywhere's as good as the next

    so taking advantage of whatever opportunities come up, in absence of a driving vision, seems perfectly legit to me

    DasUberEdwardy2jake215shalmeloFeral
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD along with you if I get drunk well I know I'm gonna be gonna be the man whoRegistered User regular
    Shivahn wrote: »
    I think the UC system wanted subject tests, but I might be remembering wrong. And California is, in general, kind of weird.

    Not in the 90s, they didn't.

    That may have changed.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Looks like I'm about to finish off ME3. With the classic ending.

    Hurray.

    I've heard others say Mass Effect 3 doesn't end until you play The Citadel DLC. They are p. adamant on this point.

  • Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    tumblr_mzygcngmgX1rjmj84o1_500.png

    poo
    BeNarwhaly2jake215DasUberEdwardkedinikemnmnmejakobagger
  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    'Time and toilet paper are running out.'

    Time and toilet paper ... toilet paper ...

This discussion has been closed.