Options

[Gridders] Delving dungeons one step at a time

RaggieRaggie SchattenjägerRegistered User regular
edited October 2015 in Games and Technology
Grid-based first person RPGs. That's a mouthful, so let's call them gridders.

This RPG sub-genre started all the way in the 80's with games like Wizardry and Dungeon Master. Gridders died out by the end of the 90's, when gaming hardware became capable enough to run first-person games with free movement. In recent years gridders have been enjoying a revival, with games like Legend of Grimrock and Etrian Odyssey being small hits. In fact, the interest in these games seems to be picking up steam rather than slowing down, and we are getting a steady trickle of new PC and handheld releases from both Japanese and Western developers.


What the heck is the point of playing something as limited as this when you could be playing Skyrim?

I guess you could say that the limitations are a part of the charm. Grid-based movement is simple and snappy and particularly suited for a handheld's d-pad. The grid also forces into a particular style of thoughtful level design. Let's just say that you won't find dungeons in Skyrim that are nearly as well designed as the ones in Grimrock or Might and Magic. Gridders are decidedly gameish, and something entirely different from all other RPGs.

Even though gridders pretty much look the same, the genre is not without variety. For example, Etrian Odyssey is about delving and mapping dungeons and building up your characters, while Legend of Grimrock is about solving puzzles and the tight atmosphere, and Might and Magic is more about adventuring in a sandbox with many dungeons and an overworld.

Battles can be either turn-based or real-time. Turn-based combat works like old-school JRPGs and have random encounters (except for Might and Magic games which have visible monsters on the field). Real-time battles work kinda like fencing, where you dance around the enemies to swipe them at opportune moments and avoid getting hit. Both styles of combat have their own tactics and can be just as fun, as long as you understand what makes them tick.


Okay, sounds interesting enough. Where can I learn more?

The Steam gridder group has all sorts of info. In addition to the associated games list on Steam, there's a list of games for Vita, PSP, DS 3DS and iPhone. Also check out the gridders on GOG.com for the PC classics.



So many games! Which ones do you recommend I should play?


That's a tough question! Do you like turn-based or real-time battles? Are you into puzzles, exploration or making the ultimate party? Do you like open world or linear games? Stat-heavy or streamlined? Anime or western art? If you can narrow down your preferences a bit, I'm sure we can hook you up with something good. All you need to do is ask!


How about future releases?

There are plenty! See them here.

ypvha57nnenm.jpg
Raggie on
«13456726

Posts

  • Options
    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    I was going to suggest Paper Sorcerer, but looking at the video on the Steam page it doesn't appear to be grid-based.

    I really should play and complete more of these. I've started several of them but only beaten a few, like Wizardry: Knight of Diamonds on NES, Etrian Odyssey 1 and I'm nearly done with 2, and Shining in the Darkness on the Genesis.

    JtgVX0H.png
  • Options
    BonepartBonepart Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    My favorite is Wizardry: Tale of the Forsaken Land. I love the dungeon exploration with the added story bits.

    Fan of this type of game in general, think I'll have to be watching this thread!

    Bonepart on
    XBL Gamertag: Ipori
  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Bonepart wrote: »
    My favorite is Wizardry: Tale of the Forsaken Land. I love the dungeon exploration with the added story bits.

    That's always a game for me that got away. I once held it on my hands and though "there's a console Wizardry now?" and put it back down. The only game I've regretted not buying more was a cheap copy of Suikoden II.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    BonepartBonepart Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    Raggie wrote: »
    Bonepart wrote: »
    My favorite is Wizardry: Tale of the Forsaken Land. I love the dungeon exploration with the added story bits.

    That's always a game for me that got away. I once held it on my hands and though "there's a console Wizardry now?" and put it back down. The only game I've regretted not buying more was a cheap copy of Suikoden II.

    That's a shame. Just recently I was thinking of throwing it back in for another play thru.

    You might also mention the old Gold Box SSI games in the OP. 1st person grid gameplay under D&D rules. PC goodness, first one released in 1988.

    I still play those from time to time as well, and they are old enough you can find them around the net.

    Bonepart on
    XBL Gamertag: Ipori
  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Bonepart wrote: »
    You might also mention the old Gold Box SSI games in the OP. 1st person grid gameplay under D&D rules. PC goodness, first one released in 1988.

    I've never played those. Aren't they sort of gridder hybrids, with first-person dungeons and overhead combat?

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    BonepartBonepart Registered User regular
    Raggie wrote: »
    Bonepart wrote: »
    You might also mention the old Gold Box SSI games in the OP. 1st person grid gameplay under D&D rules. PC goodness, first one released in 1988.

    I've never played those. Aren't they sort of gridder hybrids, with first-person dungeons and overhead combat?

    Yup, overhead turn based combat, based on the D&D rules. I suppose you could consider it a hybrid, maybe a really close cousin.

    Outside of a really vague recollection of one of the very early Wizardrys (that I saw someone else playing), the Gold Box games were my prime introduction do that style of gameplay.

    I tried Etrian Odyssey 1, but didn't stick with it long. I liked having the story bits of the Japanese Wizardry versus being only about the dungeon delving.

    XBL Gamertag: Ipori
  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Bonepart wrote: »

    I tried Etrian Odyssey 1, but didn't stick with it long. I liked having the story bits of the Japanese Wizardry versus being only about the dungeon delving.

    Sounds like Millennium Girl should be right up your alley.

    I also couldn't finish Etrian 1, but I'm on the 4th stratum in EO2 now and had fun with it.

    It's strange, but Etrian Odyssey is the most popular gridder series right now (at least out of the Japanese ones), and it's the one I enjoy the least. I just don't care for the things that are unique to EO. I dislike you can't save freely. I don't like FOEs. I'm not getting anything out of the mapping. I know I'm in the minority but I'd take Elminage and Class of Heroes as Wizardry clones over EO any day.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    Man of the WavesMan of the Waves Registered User regular
    Good ol' blobbers. (I only learned about that term recently)

    Etrian Odyssey is definitely a niche game and I'm surprised and happy that it has done so well.

    I played so many RPGs like Wizardry as a kid I can't even remember most of their titles. I assume they were easy to program, so early Apples/PCs were lousy with them and I played every one I could get my hands on.

    Until Etrian Odyssey, I hadn't played one of these games since I finished Stonekeep in the 90's (the one with the headstone for a box). I am so glad that EO and Grimrock have revived this subgenre.

  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Good ol' blobbers. (I only learned about that term recently)

    Yeah, I hate that term with a passion so I prefer calling them gridders instead.
    I am so glad that EO and Grimrock have revived this subgenre.

    It's like Etrian Odyssey convinced they should bring more Wizardry clones from Japan, and Grimrock convinced western companies to make more gridders. So it's two revivals that happened at the same time, but separately.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    Man of the WavesMan of the Waves Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    "Blobbers" still make me laugh.

    They'll always be RPGs to me. I didn't even occur to me that they needed a more specific name until I heard that and realized how many different kinds of RPGs there are.

    Another decent 3DS title is Unchained Blades. There isn't any party building or mapping, emphasizing instead the story and characters. If EO leaves you cold, this might work better for you.

    EDIT: The real reason Etrian Odyssey is so good is because Yuzo Koshiro composed the most ass-kickingest soundtrack for every title.

    Man of the Waves on
  • Options
    BonepartBonepart Registered User regular
    I'm not sure how I missed Unchained Blades. I looked it up and that game sounds awesome! I'm in the middle of Bravely Default, but I think I'll have to try it next.

    Sadly I do not have a PSP, so Elminage and Class of Heroes are out. I heard about Millennium Girl, I may have to add it to my list. Although Demon Gaze is tempting me towards a Vita, so I may have more options eventually.

    XBL Gamertag: Ipori
  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    I'll just add this from my post in the Might & Magic thread, this is a really good one that people might want to check out:

    The Dark Spire. Used to be rare and pricey, seems cheap enough now though! Very Wizardry-inspired, pick a race and class and alignment, learn a huge variety of skills that may or may not be useless, tons of equipment and spells, two full skins for the game including a modern mode and classic 8-bit mode, with wireframe dungeon and little sprites, and 8-bit music. Very arbitrary puzzles and encounters, really old style. It's great. Very highly recommended.

    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
  • Options
    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    I'll just add this from my post in the Might & Magic thread, this is a really good one that people might want to check out:

    The Dark Spire. Used to be rare and pricey, seems cheap enough now though! Very Wizardry-inspired, pick a race and class and alignment, learn a huge variety of skills that may or may not be useless, tons of equipment and spells, two full skins for the game including a modern mode and classic 8-bit mode, with wireframe dungeon and little sprites, and 8-bit music. Very arbitrary puzzles and encounters, really old style. It's great. Very highly recommended.

    Holy shit, I've had that game on my Amazon wishlist for fucking years. I should go ahead and buy it, even though I'm still not finished with EO2 and I already have 3 and 4 lined up.

    JtgVX0H.png
  • Options
    harvestharvest By birthright, a stupendous badass.Registered User regular
    Ok, your list has a serious problem because the very best PC gridder isn't there. I'm talking Wizardry 7: Crusaders of the Dark Savant, by Sir-Tech and D W Bradley. I want to write a huge essay about why it's great, but that will take a long time. So I'll write some of the features and facts instead.

    It's the second game in the trilogy made up by Wizardry 6, 7, and 8. You can import your party from Wiz 6 or make a new one. There are ten races, including charismatic wookies and acid-breathing dragon people (in addition to your normal fantasy races.) It has 14 classes, which in your standard Wizardry set includes things like ninja and samurai, but also bard, valkyrie, monk, and psionic.

    You arrive on the planet Guardia to search for the Astral Dominae, one of the three relics the Cosmic Lords utilized in the creation of the universe. Many other groups are also searching for it, both native and alien. The Dark Savant, the villain of the trilogy, already has one of the relics, so preventing him from getting the Astral Dominae is important to the larger trilogy.

    In addition to tons of dungeon crawling, Wiz 7 also has a lot of puzzle solving, NPC interaction (via text parser), a huge overworld that's basically a dungeon, a character skill-based automap, and an awesome character development system.

    Buy it on GoG or Steam.

    B6yM5w2.gif
  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    Is Wizardry 7 the one that bridges the gap from early-90s-goofy to modern-serious? Serious being similar to Morrowind.

    Because Wizardry 6 has an ancient abandoned castle that inexplicably has Queequeg in the basement selling you junk next to a pirate's den (led by Captain Matey), an early quest involving finding and returning a stuffed beagle named Snoopcheri to a frenchman in the castle towers,
    naked amazon women, killing rubber beasts to get rubber bands to fix a catapult, generally silly names like Mau-Mu-Mu and Amen-Tut-Butt, the River Styx and Charon, and one of the final bosses of the game is Dracula (spelled D R A C U L A).

    Both serious and silly games have their places...though I'm a little less charitable toward games that borrow heavily from disparate mythologies, especially specific characters. I was just curious when Wizardry turned, if ever.

    Might and Magic seemed to make a transition toward being more serious starting with 6.

    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
  • Options
    BonepartBonepart Registered User regular
    Thanks to this thread I just picked up Millennium Girl and Unchained Blades on the 3DS eShop, $20 each :smiley:

    XBL Gamertag: Ipori
  • Options
    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    Is Wizardry 7 the one that bridges the gap from early-90s-goofy to modern-serious? Serious being similar to Morrowind.

    Because Wizardry 6 has an ancient abandoned castle that inexplicably has Queequeg in the basement selling you junk next to a pirate's den (led by Captain Matey), an early quest involving finding and returning a stuffed beagle named Snoopcheri to a frenchman in the castle towers,
    naked amazon women, killing rubber beasts to get rubber bands to fix a catapult, generally silly names like Mau-Mu-Mu and Amen-Tut-Butt, the River Styx and Charon, and one of the final bosses of the game is Dracula (spelled D R A C U L A).

    Both serious and silly games have their places...though I'm a little less charitable toward games that borrow heavily from disparate mythologies, especially specific characters. I was just curious when Wizardry turned, if ever.

    Might and Magic seemed to make a transition toward being more serious starting with 6.

    The only Wizardry games I ever played until I bought 6 and 7 from GOG recently (and I haven't even played them yet) were 2 and 8, and 2 seemed mostly serious. Of course there wasn't a whole lot to the game but a single dungeon with around 8 floors, but still.

    JtgVX0H.png
  • Options
    harvestharvest By birthright, a stupendous badass.Registered User regular
    Wizardry started adding sillyness in ... 5. Heart of the Maelstrom was really the first game that started playing around with a lot of humor and fun descriptions of things. 7 has a lot of silly stuff, but it's heavily on the serious side. But you still do things like smoke a bowl in a monk crack house and see a vision of nymphs surrounding an old sage with a lecherous grin.

    B6yM5w2.gif
  • Options
    ReynoldsReynolds Gone Fishin'Registered User regular
    I'm sad you guys already made fun of 'blobbers' before I got here.

    Just let me join in by saying that's a dumb name and I still don't believe anyone ever seriously used it.

    uyvfOQy.png
  • Options
    DrascinDrascin Registered User regular
    I must say, I had never really played this genre before because I had not been much of a PC gamer, until I ran into Etrian Odyssey 2, I don't exactly remember how, and fell in love.

    Since then, in addition to all the EOs, I've played Might and Magic and Grimrock, and quite enjoyed them. Grimrock's puzzles in particular made me smile - I like this kind of thing. Is there any other games like these more focused on puzzling?

    Steam ID: Right here.
  • Options
    LanrutconLanrutcon The LabyrinthRegistered User regular
    Reynolds wrote: »
    I'm sad you guys already made fun of 'blobbers' before I got here.

    Just let me join in by saying that's a dumb name and I still don't believe anyone ever seriously used it.

    I still use it. Before the M&M thread I'd never heard the word 'Gridder' before, and I've been playing these kinds of games for like 15 years :) Whatever floats your boat.

    Capture.jpg~original
    Currently playing: GW2 and TSW
  • Options
    Man of the WavesMan of the Waves Registered User regular
    Drascin wrote: »
    I must say, I had never really played this genre before because I had not been much of a PC gamer, until I ran into Etrian Odyssey 2, I don't exactly remember how, and fell in love.

    Since then, in addition to all the EOs, I've played Might and Magic and Grimrock, and quite enjoyed them. Grimrock's puzzles in particular made me smile - I like this kind of thing. Is there any other games like these more focused on puzzling?

    Might as well delve into the classics on GoG.

    Get it? Delve!

  • Options
    M-VickersM-Vickers Registered User regular
    I've been playing Undercroft, the free iOS game, and it's well worth a download.

    I created a random party just to test it, and have decided to stick with them, see how it goes.

    It's got everything but hidden switches on walls, but I've not seen a proper dungeon yet. I have high hopes. :-)

  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Cynical Old Man Registered User regular
    This is one of my favorite type of genres... But I'm so bad at finishing them. I think the closest I got to finishing one was Shining in the Darkness for the SEGA.

  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    Drascin wrote: »
    I must say, I had never really played this genre before because I had not been much of a PC gamer, until I ran into Etrian Odyssey 2, I don't exactly remember how, and fell in love.

    Since then, in addition to all the EOs, I've played Might and Magic and Grimrock, and quite enjoyed them. Grimrock's puzzles in particular made me smile - I like this kind of thing. Is there any other games like these more focused on puzzling?

    Grimrock is specifically designed to mimic an older series of games, Dungeon Master. They are actually very similar, Grimrock stole some of the same puzzles even, IIRC.

    coxyFsO.png

    They're really difficult and old school, but if you want more Grimrock, this is what you're looking for.

    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
  • Options
    LanrutconLanrutcon The LabyrinthRegistered User regular
    One day I have to go back and finish Wizardry 4. Man that game schooled me as a kid. I remember...mummies.

    Capture.jpg~original
    Currently playing: GW2 and TSW
  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Drascin wrote: »
    I must say, I had never really played this genre before because I had not been much of a PC gamer, until I ran into Etrian Odyssey 2, I don't exactly remember how, and fell in love.

    Since then, in addition to all the EOs, I've played Might and Magic and Grimrock, and quite enjoyed them. Grimrock's puzzles in particular made me smile - I like this kind of thing. Is there any other games like these more focused on puzzling?

    Lands of Lore - The Throne of Chaos would be a good one to get next. You can get it from GOG. It's an oldie, but unless you're a graphics whore it actually looks pretty (in a pixelated way, of course). LoL1 is my favorite of this type of gridders.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Reynolds wrote: »
    I'm sad you guys already made fun of 'blobbers' before I got here.

    Just let me join in by saying that's a dumb name and I still don't believe anyone ever seriously used it.

    You know the name is full of fail when you need to explain to the fans of the genre why it's called that.

    I think the genre needs a name to set it apart from free-roaming first person dungeon crawlers. I like to call them gridders because it's a short word, easy to remember, and it says something about what makes them different.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    DrakeDrake Edgelord Trash Below the ecliptic plane.Registered User regular
    Yeah, Gridders isn't a bad term to use at all as far as I'm concerned. I knew exactly what you were talking about. Dungeon Crawler is a general term that I had lumped them in but that's a pretty broad term that covers a bunch of different perspectives and styles.

    Devil Whiskey (demo at this link) seems like it could be a good one too. I got it in a bundle at Gamersgate a while back and played it for a bit. I should make an effort to revisit it.

  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    Drake wrote: »
    Dungeon Crawler is a general term that I had lumped them in but that's a pretty broad term that covers a bunch of different perspectives and styles.

    Yeah, I've seen some people using "dungeon crawler" to mean only games like this, which makes somewhat confusing forum threads. That's why I think there should be a name we could use. Something that isn't a full sentence like "first person grid-based dungeon crawlers". :smile:
    Drake wrote: »
    Devil Whiskey (demo at this link) seems like it could be a good one too. I got it in a bundle at Gamersgate a while back and played it for a bit. I should make an effort to revisit it.

    I hadn't heard of that one. If you do revisit it, please post your impressions.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    I wasn't going to say anything but I don't really like gridder either, though it's better than blobber.

    In a shooter you shoot. In a side scroller you scroll sideways. In a gridder you grid? I don't grid. I might make a map, sure. But mostly I fight monsters and level up.

    I don't like gridder because then Diablo 1 is also a gridder, since it takes place on a grid of tiles. Roguelikes are also gridders. So are 8-bit JRPGs.

    First person RPG seems to suit it much better because that excludes most roguelikes and other types of RPGs. I know that it then includes games like Might and Magic 6 and Skyrim, but I feel like this type of game has more in common with those games than other games that simply have a grid of some sort. I mean, Might & Magic 6 with its free roaming first person is a logical extension of this sort of game.

    I don't have a problem defining a type of game by comparison. I say I enjoy roguelikes because they are like Rogue. I also enjoy Wizardry-likes, or Might-&-Magic-likes, or Grimrock-likes, or whatever you want to call them. I call them first person RPGs and people know what I mean. If they choose to misinterpret and say "you mean like Skyrim" well sure, I also like Skyrim, whatever.

    UncleSporky on
    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
  • Options
    jothkijothki Registered User regular
    Does anyone remember Shadows of Yserbius and Fates of Twinion? It's a pity that I haven't seen another game quite like them since. Everything else is so focused on you needing to actually survive in order to progress.

  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    I wasn't going to say anything but I don't really like gridder either, though it's better than blobber.

    In a shooter you shoot. In a side scroller you scroll sideways. In a gridder you grid? I don't grid. I might make a map, sure. But mostly I fight monsters and level up.

    I don't like gridder because then Diablo 1 is also a gridder, since it takes place on a grid of tiles. Roguelikes are also gridders. So are 8-bit JRPGs.

    First person RPG seems to suit it much better because that excludes most roguelikes and other types of RPGs. I know that it then includes games like Might and Magic 6 and Skyrim, but I feel like this type of game has more in common with those games than other games that simply have a grid of some sort. I mean, Might & Magic 6 with its free roaming first person is a logical extension of this sort of game.

    I don't have a problem defining a type of game by comparison. I say I enjoy roguelikes because they are like Rogue. I also enjoy Wizardry-likes, or Might-&-Magic-likes, or Grimrock-likes, or whatever you want to call them. I call them first person RPGs and people know what I mean. If they choose to misinterpret and say "you mean like Skyrim" well sure, I also like Skyrim, whatever.

    It's just a name, it's not supposed to refer to all games with a grid or include a description of the whole genre. It's just a word to make conversation easier, because "first person grid based RPGs" is too long. And I think these games are different from the free-roamers and should be called something. I just don't know any other terms besides gridders and blobbers, and I'm not going to call them blobbers. :smile:

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    SwashbucklerXXSwashbucklerXX Swashbucklin' Canuck Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    Man, Dungeon Master was one of the games that got me into RPGs back in the day... it was my second gridder after The Bard's Tale, which was much more rudimentary. My sister and I thought that eating slug segments was the funniest thing ever, because we were 8 and 11. I laugh when modern games shout about having some kind of "innovation" that I remember seeing in Dungeon Master.

    Another one of my favourite gridders was the Eye of the Beholder series. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be on GoG or Steam, but those games were great and hard as hell. I remember getting through about half of EotB 2 before having to pick up the hint book because I'd started to get to areas with secret doors and spinner tiles and teleport traps and all that jazz.

    SwashbucklerXX on
    Want to find me on a gaming service? I'm SwashbucklerXX everywhere.
  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    Another good one I remember is Dungeon Hack:

    EJbSRaG.jpg

    It was more along the lines of Dungeon Master because combat was real time. There wasn't a party, just the one character. I really like the sprite art in it.

    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
  • Options
    OrogogusOrogogus San DiegoRegistered User regular
    Man, Dungeon Master was one of the games that got me into RPGs back in the day... it was my second gridder after The Bard's Tale, which was much more rudimentary. My sister and I thought that eating slug segments was the funniest thing ever, because we were 8 and 11. I laugh when modern games shout about having some kind of "innovation" that I remember seeing in Dungeon Master.

    Another one of my favourite gridders was the Eye of the Beholder series. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be on GoG or Steam, but those games were great and hard as hell. I remember getting through about half of EotB 2 before having to pick up the hint book because I'd started to get to areas with secret doors and spinner tiles and teleport traps and all that jazz.

    You played The Bard's Tale, but thought the Eye of the Beholder games were hard?

    My memory of the Bard's Tale is the first dungeon (after the training cellar) being full of invisible teleporters throwing you into magically dark anti-magic spinners. Plus a whole hell of a lot of grinding, mostly involving 396 Berserkers, DRBR and a heavy book on the space bar.

  • Options
    RaggieRaggie Schattenjäger Registered User regular
    It was more along the lines of Dungeon Master because combat was real time. There wasn't a party, just the one character. I really like the sprite art in it.

    Yes, that's a fun one for a quick dungeon romp. I agree about the art.

    ypvha57nnenm.jpg
  • Options
    SwashbucklerXXSwashbucklerXX Swashbucklin' Canuck Registered User regular
    Orogogus wrote: »
    Man, Dungeon Master was one of the games that got me into RPGs back in the day... it was my second gridder after The Bard's Tale, which was much more rudimentary. My sister and I thought that eating slug segments was the funniest thing ever, because we were 8 and 11. I laugh when modern games shout about having some kind of "innovation" that I remember seeing in Dungeon Master.

    Another one of my favourite gridders was the Eye of the Beholder series. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be on GoG or Steam, but those games were great and hard as hell. I remember getting through about half of EotB 2 before having to pick up the hint book because I'd started to get to areas with secret doors and spinner tiles and teleport traps and all that jazz.

    You played The Bard's Tale, but thought the Eye of the Beholder games were hard?

    My memory of the Bard's Tale is the first dungeon (after the training cellar) being full of invisible teleporters throwing you into magically dark anti-magic spinners. Plus a whole hell of a lot of grinding, mostly involving 396 Berserkers, DRBR and a heavy book on the space bar.

    I was a fair bit older when I played EOTB than when I played Bard's Tale, for which I just used the hint book for maps the entire time. I don't remember early dungeons having that crap, but I definitely remember that the entire final dungeon in the Bard's Tale III was full of that invisible teleporter/dark anti-magic spinner stuff. I couldn't finish that one even with the map. By the time EOTB came out, I was old enough to want to give it a shot on my own.

    Want to find me on a gaming service? I'm SwashbucklerXX everywhere.
  • Options
    Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited March 2014
    The term I use and hear used a lot is "Wizardry clone" or "Wizardry-like". It's jargon (no more so than gridder or blobber, which I've never heard in person, but have read on internet gamer forums), but it seems to convey the same feeling pretty nicely. It's about the same as "Rogue-like" to describe games that are "like Rogue"... people still use the term even if they've never played Rogue (or in this case, Wizardry).

    Hahnsoo1 on
    8i1dt37buh2m.png
  • Options
    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    edited March 2014
    Raggie wrote: »
    It was more along the lines of Dungeon Master because combat was real time. There wasn't a party, just the one character. I really like the sprite art in it.

    Yes, that's a fun one for a quick dungeon romp. I agree about the art.

    I just played it for a few hours. A few things I forgot about it that are pretty cool:

    - It's fully based on Dungeons and Dragons second edition, with most of the rules and items working the same way they do in pencil and paper, so that's nice for D&D fans.

    - The dungeons are randomly generated, much like a roguelike, so it's infinitely replayable. It even generates puzzles (mostly just key-and-door stuff, but hey).

    - It's totally customizable. You can roll a character legitimately, or crank up their stats to the max, or reduce them. You can set the number of floors, whether or not multi-floor puzzles will be generated (find a key on floor 2 to open a door on floor 4), whether or not there are areas of water (requiring holding your breath or water breathing), how many magic items you find, how many monsters there are, how tough the combat is, all sorts of things. You can enforce perma-death or not. You can turn off undead, which I probably should have done, since on one floor they drained levels which is the WORST thing in the world.

    3NerpcE.jpg

    I'm playing a fighter/mage/cleric which is slow going leveling up, but since you're by yourself it's good to have as many options as possible. Luckily on the very first floor I found robes of the magi, which give you good armor class and you can still cast mage spells while wearing them.

    To be honest all you really need is access to cleric spells since they get create food which is really helpful and means you can dink around as long as you like.

    UncleSporky on
    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
Sign In or Register to comment.