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Law of sines and trig question

b0bd0db0bd0d Registered User regular
edited April 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
my.php?image=trigrh2.jpg

okay, what am I doing wrong?

b0bd0d on

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    Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    SOH CAH TOA.

    You know all the angles. You want to relate the hypotenuse to either x or y. Since sin and cos both relate to the hypotenuse (sin@ = opposite/hyptenuse and cos@ = adjacent/hypotenuse) you can use either of them.

    So, sin45degrees = (root2) / x and sin45degrees = (root2)/y
    You can see this from the graph, correct?

    Just solve for the unknown variable. You know how to do that?

    Al_wat on
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    b0bd0db0bd0d Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    yeah, I know. y and x are one...so 1^2 and 1^2 equal...1? so sqr1 equals...1. So that means...the hypo is 1....but it's not. It's sqr2.

    b0bd0d on
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    VirumVirum Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    a^2 + b^2 = c^2

    so:

    1^2 + 1^2 = ?

    1 + 1 = 2

    take square root of answer to find hypotenuse:

    sqrt(2)

    It's right.
    One AND one is TWO.

    Virum on
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    Bob SappBob Sapp Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    If x and y are both one then the pythagorean theorem has the hypotenuse being sqrt(2).

    x^2 + y^2 = h^2
    1 + 1 = h^2
    2 = h^2
    h = sqrt(2)

    Edit: beaten

    Bob Sapp on
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    b0bd0db0bd0d Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    aha!! Some i'm an idiot eh? stupid addition. YOU WIN AGAIN!
    wait, what's the sqr of 2?

    b0bd0d on
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    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    The sqr of 2 is 4. The sqrt of 2 is an irrational number, so you can't write it, but it is approximately 1.41.

    Smug Duckling on
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    mrcheesypantsmrcheesypants Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Also for future reference remember the unit circle. A 45 degree right triangle has a side to hypotenuse ratio of (sqrt(2)/2):1. A 60/30 degree triangle ratio is (1/2):1 (sqrt(3)/2):1.

    And you should never use the law of sines and cosines to find measurements for a right triangle.

    mrcheesypants on
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    b0bd0db0bd0d Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    why not? It's not correct? Explain, I'm interested.

    b0bd0d on
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    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited April 2007
    No, but he was just saying there is an easier way, (IE the unit circle method he mentioned).
    My advice is to just memorize those 3 configurations, you'll find them often enough.
    Also, if you don't know the unit circle, just keep working this way. Better to learn one way 100% than 2 ways 1/2.

    Iceman.USAF on
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    b0bd0db0bd0d Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    no, what I'm asking is, why should you not use law of sines to find right angles? I got the unit circle memorized. That's not it. I'm actually wondering something but I think I'm doing something wrong to get the solution.

    "The sqr of 2 is 4. The sqrt of 2 is an irrational number, so you can't write it, but it is approximately 1.41."
    Yeah, but that triangle says it's 1...doesn't it?

    b0bd0d on
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    Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    no, it really doesn't

    Al_wat on
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