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What if few people you've worked with are on LinkedIn?

manwiththemachinegunmanwiththemachinegun METAL GEAR?!Registered User regular
edited June 2014 in Help / Advice Forum
So I'm building my online resume with LinkedIn and trying to get skills endorsements. The problem is, most teachers aren't exactly tech savvy where I live, and most of whom wouldn't know social networking if it came up and stabbed them in the ribs. Of the six teachers I worked closely with, only one is on LinkedIn and I'm have trouble contacting him. I have a few letters of reference available, but I'm told they don't carry nearly the weight they once did. It's hard when you've worked in a field for 3 years and have very little you can share online.

I'm contacting other people for other endorsements, but teaching is the main one I'd like to pad. Any ideas other than going to the districts directly? So... how weighted are endorsements really? Is it better not to have a skills section if you don't have endorsements?

manwiththemachinegun on

Posts

  • SerpentSerpent Sometimes Vancouver, BC, sometimes Brisbane, QLDRegistered User regular
    I think endorsements are useless.

    Recommendations are worth something, though.

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    LinkedIn is almost worthless except possibly for networking when you're looking for a new job.

    Endorsements on LinkedIn are completely worthless.

  • manwiththemachinegunmanwiththemachinegun METAL GEAR?! Registered User regular
    I do have work projects from school, my degrees, a nice profile picture and summary, plus a few letters.

    So you would say keep it to contacting people at various companies/schools you want to work with and keep it there?

  • StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    Linkedin is a garbage site with garbage credibility.

  • manwiththemachinegunmanwiththemachinegun METAL GEAR?! Registered User regular
    edited June 2014
    That's interesting to me since several people have mentioned how one of the first things hiring managers are starting to do is Google your name and check your LinkedIn page or other social media. This is in the Pacific Northwest. There's one company in particular I got an immediate view from after applying without providing a LinkedIn link.

    manwiththemachinegun on
  • darqnessdarqness KCMORegistered User regular
    Endorsements are totally useless. I've received several from people for skills that they've never even witnessed or had accounts of me performing. Hell my dad endorsed me which doesn't look good at all.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    Endorsements are worthless because they go like this:

    EggyToast, Job Title: Lead Forum Guy

    Endorsed for:
    Leading
    Foruming
    Being a Guy

    As someone who works in a more client-facing business, LinkedIn is pretty cool! Whether it gets you a job or not, I don't know, but companies are starting to use it for hiring and other purposes, so it's good to be on it.

    But I wouldn't stress too much about making your LinkedIn account perfect. Get a plugin that lets you post your resume on your page while you're looking for a job, and don't quit your day job (which, if you're unemployed, is looking for work or figuring out a way to make money).

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • manwiththemachinegunmanwiththemachinegun METAL GEAR?! Registered User regular
    I suppose it still has its uses, but this kind of feedback is useful too. Thanks for the heads up.

  • kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited June 2014
    people will google-stalk you. but that's more about making sure nothing bad/stupid comes up. like if the first hit is of you being a registered watermelon molester or if you have a poorly-formatted linkedin profile, or if there are inconsistencies or apparent inconsistencies between linkedin and your resume.

    my favorite was the (otherwise very good) summer associate candidate who i interviewed, and her fb profile came up, and the only thing you could see was her name, school, and that she was admin of a group called the itty-bitty titty committee. which obviously you can't bring up in an interview, even though i guarantee every interviewer saw that. but, two years later, i can barely remember what school she went to, don't remember her name, just that fact about her.

    kaliyama on
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  • CyberJackalCyberJackal Registered User regular
    It's worthwhile to be on LinkedIn. I've been contacted through it with legitimate opportunities, and the listings in the jobs section have been legitimate in my experience. The endorsements are probably worthless though. I mean, I guess maybe you could come across a hiring manager that takes them seriously? But anyone should be able to see that they can be gamed very easily.

  • DeebaserDeebaser on my way to work in a suit and a tie Ahhhh...come on fucking guyRegistered User regular
    Gaslight wrote: »
    LinkedIn is almost worthless except possibly for networking when you're looking for a new job.

    Disagree. I have had people headhunt me through linkedin.

    Endorsements on LinkedIn are completely worthless.

    10000% agree.

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    I don't even get what LinkedIn endorsements are. I recently got an endorsement from the wife of a guy I used to work with, about 10 years ago, for programming. I happen to be a great programmer, but she knows absolutely nothing at all about me. We met a few times and watched sci-fi together, so she has no clue whether I can program or not. What do people get for randomly endorsing people?

    LinkedIn is just fine as a place to store an online resume. But watch out for the scam artists. Take job offers with a pinch of salt.

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    I use linkedin only to know who is working where and whether I know someone who knows a person I'm researching. The rest of it is self-inflated garbage.

    I've got "endorsement seekers" on my list who endorse literally everyone for everything, because they're hoping you'll return in kind.

    The recommendations are also pretty worthless, because it's been my experience that the least capable people I've worked with have lots of recommendations, while the most capable don't have any. I assume this is because the least capable people are spending their time on linkedin when they should be working. :P

    What is this I don't even.
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    What do people get for randomly endorsing people?

    I'm guessing she wanted to buff you?


    I don't do social media. The only one I had considered was LinkedIn. But purely for professional "networking" showmanship (putting things in place so months later I exist if you google me and people say nice things about me) ... which made me feel dirty for thinking about getting involved.

  • darqnessdarqness KCMORegistered User regular
    Don't get me wrong, Linkedin can be a great tool. But I would say it's only a great tool for networking and job hunting.

    The only case that endorsements MIGHT mean something is when Bob the salesman has 15 years of experience in the field, has held numerous positions, and has 50+ endorsements in each category.

    Any hiring manager that looks at a few endorsements and takes them for the real thing simply doesn't know how Linkedin works.

  • L Ron HowardL Ron Howard The duck MinnesotaRegistered User regular
    My issues with it is that it's turned from a decently professional tool to a replacement for Facebook.
    I've had my parents and other family members connect with me, as well as their friends who I've met a few times.
    And they've done the Endorsement thing for skills I've put on there that I haven't used in forever. But now that those are endorsed, I can't remove them.

    I get hit up by headhunters all the time, even though I'm not looking for another job and, AFAIK, have nothing that indicates that I am.

    I basically keep it very barebones, because I haven't had much use for it.

  • CalixtusCalixtus Registered User regular
    The good thing about LinkedIn is that its a very low maintance way of remaining visible in the job market and maintaing a network. I definitely recommend making a solid effort at getting a good profile up, because once you have it, you can just tweak it when something changes. As several others have said, the worst that can happen is basically that you get cold-calls for job offers you don't want, which is one of the most first-world problems you can have.

    I did solid profile when I graduated, worked for six months without changing anything on it, switched jobs and basically just added a description of the job I left and a few sentences on the job I went to. The update took like 10-15 minutes, and I keep a profile in two languages so I had to do everything twice. A month goes by and I get a call from a guy who found me on LinkedIn and wants to interview me for a job. I wasn't interested right now, but I've got the guys number, and if things go belly-up at my current lovely job, he's now the first guy I'll call.

    That's an amazing time-effort-reward ratio compared to lead-generation when you're actually doing it actively because you need to.

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  • SolventSolvent Econ-artist กรุงเทพมหานครRegistered User regular
    I have only recently started a LinkedIn profile, and shortly after I found that people in my sector used it. I have been contacted by multiple headhunters, and even now (with my new job at a large company) people across the firm use it so they know what I can do without having worked on a project with me yet.

    That said, I have but a single endorsement. So they don't appear to carry much weight.

    I don't know where he got the scorpions, or how he got them into my mattress.

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  • bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    if your options are a crap, empty linkedin or none at all

    choose none

    sC4Q4nq.jpg
  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Linkedin is a garbage site with garbage credibility.

    It works well for job networking so I have to strongly disagree.

    However other than for a place to display your C.V. and maintain a contact list I'll agree it is useless. Like the endorsements which are at best funny - being endorsed for technical skills by people you know hardly know what those skill are about is not uncommon thus the endorsements carry little weight.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    It seems like you'd be just as good on indeed or Monster than LinkedIn. You also get headhunted there if you make your resume visible, and really it's kind of the same lower level stuff and never anyone worthwhile.

    In my experience LinkedIn is one of these things people are told they need to be on and are keeping up with imaginary joneses and like Facebook the amount of endorsements or skills you say you have really don't carry as much weight as those people might perceive, and half of them are probably outdated or were spam anyway. It feels like a sucker's game for those who are just outside the bubble of technologically literate or capable of doing anything on the internet and want to be seen as with it. The worst thing is meeting with someone for a project or meeting and then at the end they're trying to ask if you're on LinkedIn because to them another endorsement seems to be more important than the actual, physical job.

    I'd think you'd be better off with a presentable facebook picture and nothing too incriminating there and simply uploading to a career based website. But I admit at this point were I the hiring person for my company, someone who had little to no online presence would peak my interest more because in this day and age it would appear like they are busy working instead of being glued to social media.

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    TexiKen wrote: »
    I'd think you'd be better off with a presentable facebook picture and nothing too incriminating there and simply uploading to a career based website. But I admit at this point were I the hiring person for my company, someone who had little to no online presence would peak my interest more because in this day and age it would appear like they are busy working instead of being glued to social media.

    Don't you suspect that their real online presence is under another name? One of my Facebook friends uses her cat's name for personal stuff.

  • GizzyGizzy i am a cat PhoenixRegistered User regular
    I've had several head hunters contact me through linkedin. Also I've been invited out to several networking group dinners for people in finance/accounting (I never go, but it's nice that's a thing).

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  • djmitchelladjmitchella Registered User regular
    I've just been setting myself up on Linkedin, and I keep getting requests to "join my network" from people that I don't know at all that are purely recruiters; is there any reason I'd do this? I'm mostly setting things up so that I can find ex-coworkers if I find myself needing to look for another job, so in that context recruiters could be useful, but do I need to actually add them to my network just in case?

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    I've just been setting myself up on Linkedin, and I keep getting requests to "join my network" from people that I don't know at all that are purely recruiters; is there any reason I'd do this? I'm mostly setting things up so that I can find ex-coworkers if I find myself needing to look for another job, so in that context recruiters could be useful, but do I need to actually add them to my network just in case?

    I don't trust the desperate kind of recruiters that just spam you. Steer clear, I say. Though I do not have personal experience with them; others may know more.

  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    I've gotten my recent jobs from LinkedIn, so would certainly recommend having a good profile up. Doesn't mean you have to post your daily insights or anything, but get it current, then occasionally add new skills or if you go to a conference or something.

  • PacificstarPacificstar Registered User regular
    edited June 2014
    I think LinkedIn is a great resource for keeping professional contacts up to date. I also have had very legitimate recruiters headhunt me for legit jobs at fortune 500 companies. At the very least, keep it updated and use the information from headhunters as to what your value is on the job market. That said, I think the recommendations on skills are bullshit.
    Linkedin is a garbage site with garbage credibility.

    My experience is exactly opposite. If you work in finance/accounting or law, everyone I know has had very good experience with it.

    Pacificstar on
  • SilverEternitySilverEternity Registered User regular
    @manwiththemachinegun‌ You mention teaching. Are you trying to get a job teaching or are you trying to use that experience to parlay to a new career?

    I know people in different fields (advertising and engineering) who have been contacted by recruiters, received job interviews, and subsequently gotten great jobs because of LinkedIn.

    However, as someone in the teaching field, I don't think LinkedIn is as significant a resource for finding a job teaching. As others have said it is a good idea to have a good "Google" profile and LinkedIn can certainly provide a positive result for your name, but I think an online portfolio would do more for you. Moreover, I think that regarding endorsements, it is much more powerful to have a reference from an administrator rather than a fellow teacher (your internship mentor would be an exception and should be listed as a reference imo). If you are trying to teach I recommend just looking up schools and regional educational consortiums in your target area. Almost all school sites have an employment link. There are also teaching specific websites that are much better than LinkedIn.

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