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This is why we need another [Feminism Thread].

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Posts

  • MorivethMoriveth BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWNRegistered User regular
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Pony wrote: »
    One thing I'll give my parents credit for is they did not raise me with the notion that "boys don't cry".

    My dad was of the view that "Men who repress their emotions go insane", and pointed out that historically it was considered manly to cry and show emotion because it meant you gave a shit and that all this stiff upper lip holding it in shit was uptight garbage of lesser men who were always afraid of their position relative to others.

    This is how I would want to raise my sons, most definitely. Your dad is awesome right there.

    Viv this ain't the sims you can't influence the sex of your kids!

  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Moriveth wrote: »
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Pony wrote: »
    One thing I'll give my parents credit for is they did not raise me with the notion that "boys don't cry".

    My dad was of the view that "Men who repress their emotions go insane", and pointed out that historically it was considered manly to cry and show emotion because it meant you gave a shit and that all this stiff upper lip holding it in shit was uptight garbage of lesser men who were always afraid of their position relative to others.

    This is how I would want to raise my sons, most definitely. Your dad is awesome right there.

    Viv this ain't the sims you can't influence the sex of your kids!

    JUST WATCH ME

    THROUGH SHEER FORCE OF WILL

    but no for real I'd also raise my DAUGHTERS with this thought because I want them to know that good men don't act like uptight garbage

    Vivixenne on
    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
    MorivethGoatmonUsagiEdith UpwardsJaysonFourOdinCaulk Bite 6LegbaAnialosDonovan PuppyfuckerShadowenHellaJeff
  • MorivethMoriveth BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWNRegistered User regular
    If anyone could do that it would probably be you, lady.

    GoatmonEdith Upwards
  • PonyPony Registered User regular
    Goatmon wrote: »
    God dammit, really Pony?

    That just makes me fucking mad.

    Not at you, obviously, just

    fucking

    argh

    yep

    like, basically, we hadn't talked in a couple years because obviously our break-up was ugly

    it kinda involved her slashing my face with a shattered mirror shard so

    you know

    ugly

    but a mutual friend was like "Yeah, so, after she spent some time in a psych ward it turns out she has Asperger's and her medication was all wrong for her" and i'm like

    well that explains like

    literally every aspect of her behavior, holy fuck

    i'm glad she's getting help

    i mean, yes, she was abusive towards me and being with her was one of the worst periods of my entire life but

    i don't hate her, that's not who i am, and i do not wish her ill

    i want her to get care and become a better person and move on and not hurt anyone anymore, including herself, who she hurt most of all

    also this is why i react very poorly to the whole "manic pixie dream girl" thing in fiction

    because uh yeah i was with someone who is actually like that and it turns out they can have an undiagnosed disorder and be an absolute nightmare to be with

    fuck you, movies

    Calica
  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Houk wrote: »
    this is kinda outta the blue, but...

    @Vivixenne you might not feel comfortable giving advice on this, and if not that's totally fair, but I super duper respect your opinion as a smart and thoughtful and all around radical lady - if someone has never felt like they have any kind of specific emotional or mental problems, but also feels like maybe it would do them a lot of good to take some time to talk with a therapist just to sort out whatever junk they got goin' on upstairs, but has never had to do this and doesn't know anyone in their day-to-day life who can point them in the right direction...how would you suggest they go about finding someone to talk to? I'm sure there are websites or whatever that will have info about local professionals, what their strengths and weaknesses are or whatever, but do you have any general advice for someone who'd like to look for a therapist but has no idea where to start or what to look for?

    I'm asking for a friend...who lives in...my brain?

    In this case, I wouldn't start with a therapist per se. I'd start with a counsellor. Think of a counsellor like a problem-solver, and the problem you need solving is whether or not you need capital-T Therapy. It's just a casual chat with someone whose job it is to be a sounding board and a supportive ear. Sometimes, that can be all you need to just make SENSE of what's going on.

    I am not familiar with the system in the US so I think my advice might have to stop there - look into counselling for now, if it's an option. In Australia I would have a laundry list of numbers and services to call, including your own doctor, to figure it out. But the US is not ground I know.

    EDIT: we've got a fair number of good online counselling services here in Australia, maybe there are a couple of reputable ones in the US?

    Vivixenne on
    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
  • YukiraYukira Registered User regular
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Goatmon wrote: »
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    I think I've mentioned this before in another context, but mental health needs feminism.

    The stats are that young women are diagnosed at higher rates of depression and anxiety than men and while some people translate this into women being more predisposed for it (and they are, like in cases of PND), I think it's also because women are more likely to actually talk about their feelings and get help and thus get diagnosed.

    Make it okay for men to express emotions verbally and be vulnerable. Please. For these men today, and more importantly for the next generation of men who will model their behaviour after them. Stop ridiculing these totally functionally healthy traits because they are "feminine". They're not. Your brain has the ability to learn how to do these things, regardless of your sex or even gender - NEUROPLASTICITY! The problem is PRACTICE.

    There's a book called "Why Boys Throw Better Than Girls" - it's a satirical piece that actually highlights a real reason for why, on average, boys throw better than girls. This is because it's been made okay for boys to do this repetitively from a young age, perpetuating into adolescence (usually). Whereas girls don't do throw as often because it's not "girly" to be into sport or some bullshit like that. Yet, if a girl throws with the same frequency and repetition from a young age as a boy, they throw just as accurately and with almost equal efficiency.

    Mo'Ne Davis is just a fabulous example of this.

    So, by a similar token, boys are shitty at expressing their feelings (by and large) and seeking help because they were never encouraged to actually practice doing it.

    My therapist the other day told me that one of the most common problems he hears about (if not THE most common) was women griping about how their boyfriends/husbands refuse to talk about their feelings or even give THEM shit for crying and other such nonsense.

    We raise guys to be ignorant jackasses.

    And it really needs to stop.

    Yup. I have dealt with some fathers, let me tell you.

    That said. One of the reasons I find that guys find showing vulnerability to be a weakness is that often, we all comment on how good it is to have a "rock" in our lives. Someone stable, able to hold our anxieties and distress, someone to contain us when things fall apart. And it IS important to have someone like that in your life, who can keep it all together and make it okay for you to fall apart and help you put yourself back together again.

    The message for young men - and eventually, older man as role models - is that not being this "rock" is a failure in your role as a man, or that being a rock means you can never be vulnerable, or that the women in your life can't be your "rock" as you were for them.

    Back when we were looking at buying our house, Blake's job looked uncertain and he wasn't confident in our ability to afford a mortgage. I talked to my mum about it a bit because, well, anxiety begets anxiety and while I was containing him, I needed my own container. My mum's response was that Blake had been supporting me for a number of years and this is the dynamic we'd had for a while because I arrived in Perth with no job prospects. But now that I HAD a job, maybe it was my turn to be the stable one, and take the pressure off Blake.

    I recount this because I never realised how poignant the point my mum was making really was. I didn't even think that *I* could be the stable fixture in our relationship. Maybe it never even occurred to Blake, since it WAS a huge shift for us in our relationship that I was now gainfully employed. I almost felt abashed that it hadn't occurred to me sooner.

    One of the most heartbreaking things I heard at the grave site for my grandmother, was my grandfather apologizing to his four daughters for crying because he was always the foundation and he felt like he wasn't doing his duty.

    Yeah.

    I've been trying to be a lot more open with Sier for the last few years, but that moment really drove home how this idea of never showing emotions is messed up.

    Edith UpwardsTefDonovan PuppyfuckerCalica
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Moriveth wrote: »
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Pony wrote: »
    One thing I'll give my parents credit for is they did not raise me with the notion that "boys don't cry".

    My dad was of the view that "Men who repress their emotions go insane", and pointed out that historically it was considered manly to cry and show emotion because it meant you gave a shit and that all this stiff upper lip holding it in shit was uptight garbage of lesser men who were always afraid of their position relative to others.

    This is how I would want to raise my sons, most definitely. Your dad is awesome right there.

    Viv this ain't the sims you can't influence the sex of your kids!

    JUST WATCH ME

    THROUGH SHEER FORCE OF WILL

    I'm picturing Blake walking in on you attempting to fit a headband wit ha little dangling green crystal on a wire, on the new baby

    "Honey we've talked about this"

    "WHY CANT YOU LET ME LIVE MY DREAM"

    Goatmon on
    Switch Friend Code: SW-6680-6709-4204


  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    I would not be surprised if there were a hey "Ash whatcha playin" about exactly this.

    Goatmon on
    Switch Friend Code: SW-6680-6709-4204


  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    this thread makes me kinda want to have sons because then I can raise them to be awesome patriarchy smashers

    I had never even thought about it that way before, because in my brain I've always wanted girls that I could raise to also be awesome patriarchy smashers

    Vivixenne on
    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
    GoatmonEdith UpwardsNightDragonMetalbourneCalicaNullzone
  • JohnHamJohnHam Registered User regular
    Basically if your kids are going to smash something, it might as well be the patriarchy.

    signature.png

    HunteraGoatmonEdith UpwardsTheySlashThemJaysonFourNightDragonOdinDonovan PuppyfuckerShadowenMr FuzzbuttSorceRainfallSedraxismasterofmetroidMoth 13Rawkking GoodguyMadEddyNullzone
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    If I have kids (god help me) they'll probably be girls.

    It seems like every generation of my immediate family had two girls before having a boy, at least on my mom's side.

    My mom has one sister and one younger brother.

    I'm the youngest with two older sisters

    My oldest sister has two daughters

    Just over three years ago my younger sister had her first kid, a daughter.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6680-6709-4204


  • AistanAistan Tiny Bat Registered User regular
    Good night, feminism thread.

    I'm always glad when these threads come around because even though a lot of shitty situations get talked about it makes me happy to know there are all these people here in this community i'm sort of a part of working hard to make things better. I won't say I try my best because I have problems with motivation and perhaps this dysthymia thing that was brought up, which I will be asking my doctor about pretty soon, but all of you are rock stars. Like, holy shit you all are amazing.

    GoatmonArdolJusticeforPluto
  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    My maternal instincts have been steadily swelling for a while now. I think I'd like to have kids someday. If only to raise them to be subversive little shits re: the patriarchy. :3

    That sounds like a good thing to do.

    UsagiTheySlashThemJaysonFourNightDragonAnialosSorce
  • HacksawHacksaw J. Duggan Esq. Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    Y'all are free to come post in the Love thread after Geth inevitably shuts this one down in the most cold and robotic of ways.

    All are welcome.

    Even big bull men like @‌Pony

    Keep the rutting to a minimum, though; we're on notice about that kind of thing.

    Geth
  • TefTef Registered User regular
    One thing I see a lot of in discussions around mental health therapies is a fixation on medication. For instance, discussing with people how I've sought formal help in the past, there is inevitably questions about what kind of pills I take, or if I'm still on pills for it. Fortunately, I was not so severe so that I have effectively managed through other means.

    Just two days ago, I was discussing Robin William's passing with some colleagues and the conversation turned to the perceived rise in depression diagnoses. One of the comments was along the lines of, 'that's a lot of people taking happy pills' to which most if the group agreed. Aside from the obvious issues around the blasé way in which it was referenced, it really drove home to me that quite a few people really do think that medication is the key part of treating mental illnesses

    help a fellow forumer meet their mental health care needs because USA healthcare sucks!

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better

    bit.ly/2XQM1ke
    tynic
  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    Goatmon wrote: »
    If I have kids (god help me) they'll probably be girls.

    It seems like every generation of my immediate family had two girls before having a boy, at least on my mom's side.

    My mom has one sister and one younger brother.

    I'm the youngest with two older sisters

    My oldest sister has two daughters

    Just over three years ago my younger sister had her first kid, a daughter.

    holy shit I just realised this is my family, too!

    my mom's side - my grandmother was the oldest of 8 and the next-oldest was a girl

    my mom and aunt are the oldest of 4

    then my sister and I

    of the other grandkids on my mom's side, only 1 out of the 4 families had boys before they eventually had a girl; the other 3 families apart from ours are 1 girl, 2 girls, and 2 boys/1 girl.

    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
    Goatmon
  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    Oh, Geth.

    GoatmonJaysonFourCaulk Bite 6ShadowenSedraxis
  • PonyPony Registered User regular
    you know it's funny

    with age, the number of women who flirt with me has decreased

    the number of dudes has increased

    i think i have been bearing with age

    GoatmonbsjezzceresAnialosShadowenHellaJeff
  • bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    actually faced with raising a son, it's hard. i know that i will specifically tell this one to talk about anything wrong with his health (and not just mental health), because not talking caused me to go through a heap of medical shit as a teenager that i'll always have to deal with. but at the same time, one of the most important things for me to impart to him is resilience. now that's not the same as stoicism: resilience involves coping strategies, stoicism is essentially deciding not to deal; but i want to make sure he is confronted with genuine challenges and tasked with finding a way to handle them. that's not always just talking, and indeed - depending on the problem - sometimes it can look a bit like stoicism.

    that it's hard to articulate how to handle any given situation means it's all the more important to be open and honest and a good model. and that's why i'm constantly asking myself right now, what do i need to change, before he's really listening?

    sC4Q4nq.jpg
    Tef
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    Dammit Pony, now I have to post it

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twQlpFrm5iM

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6680-6709-4204


    UsagiCaulk Bite 6Mortal SkyAnialosHellaJeffFyndirMoth 13
  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Tef wrote: »
    One thing I see a lot of in discussions around mental health therapies is a fixation on medication. For instance, discussing with people how I've sought formal help in the past, there is inevitably questions about what kind of pills I take, or if I'm still on pills for it. Fortunately, I was not so severe so that I have effectively managed through other means.

    Just two days ago, I was discussing Robin William's passing with some colleagues and the conversation turned to the perceived rise in depression diagnoses. One of the comments was along the lines of, 'that's a lot of people taking happy pills' to which most if the group agreed. Aside from the obvious issues around the blasé way in which it was referenced, it really drove home to me that quite a few people really do think that medication is the key part of treating mental illnesses

    I reckon that's down to two main things.

    1) Depression as an illness. This is a good perspective to have, because it implies that it requires treatment. However, the prevailing culture in the West is that medication treats illnesses, even though it's not so simple with mental health illness. Plus, let us not forget how intensely marketed antidepressants are in the US especially - such as ads on TV, which exposes the general populace to the concept of "happy pills" without any proper education as to what they actually treat.

    2) Medication as the only solution. The reason why medication tends to be very common among the adult population is because things like therapy take a lot longer than meds for there to be a perceivable difference. The issue is that as adults, you need to function in the interim and often cannot afford to wait that long for things to get better - you have plenty of other priorities that also demand your time. So for a lot of these people, medication is used to stabilise or at least address some of the more severe symptoms (amotivation, lethargy/fatigue, sleep, mood instability) while therapy is left as something for "later" because the benefit is so small in increments and the time commitment is significant the older you get.

    Vivixenne on
    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
    Tef
  • VivixenneVivixenne Remember your training, and we'll get through this just fine. Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Pony wrote: »
    you know it's funny

    with age, the number of women who flirt with me has decreased

    the number of dudes has increased

    i think i have been bearing with age

    ugh that joke is unbearable

    I think need to paws my posting in this thread before it ends

    Vivixenne on
    XBOX: NOVADELPHINI | DISCORD: NOVADELPHINI #7387 | TWITTER
    GoatmonSedraxisRawkking GoodguyMadEddy
  • GoatmonGoatmon Companion of Kess Registered User regular
    Viv, no

    I will fight you tooth and claw to put a stop to your puns.

    Switch Friend Code: SW-6680-6709-4204


    Sedraxis
  • TefTef Registered User regular
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    Tef wrote: »
    One thing I see a lot of in discussions around mental health therapies is a fixation on medication. For instance, discussing with people how I've sought formal help in the past, there is inevitably questions about what kind of pills I take, or if I'm still on pills for it. Fortunately, I was not so severe so that I have effectively managed through other means.

    Just two days ago, I was discussing Robin William's passing with some colleagues and the conversation turned to the perceived rise in depression diagnoses. One of the comments was along the lines of, 'that's a lot of people taking happy pills' to which most if the group agreed. Aside from the obvious issues around the blasé way in which it was referenced, it really drove home to me that quite a few people really do think that medication is the key part of treating mental illnesses

    I reckon that's down to two main things.

    1) Depression as an illness. This is a good perspective to have, because it implies that it requires treatment. However, the prevailing culture in the West is that medication treats illnesses, even though it's not so simple with mental health illness. Plus, let us not forget how intensely marketed antidepressants are in the US especially - such as ads on TV, which exposes the general populace to the concept of "happy pills" without any proper education as to what they actually treat.

    2) Medication as the only solution. The reason why medication tends to be very common among the adult population is because things like therapy take a lot longer than meds for there to be a perceivable difference. The issue is that as adults, you need to function in the interim and often cannot afford to wait that long for things to get better - you have plenty of other priorities that also demand your time. So for a lot of these people, medication is used to stabilise or at least address some of the more severe symptoms (amotivation, lethargy/fatigue, sleep, mood instability) while therapy is left as something for "later" because the benefit is so small in increments and the time commitment is significant the older you get.

    Absolutely. I probably sounded a bit more negative about the situation than I probably intended because in actuality, I think I prefer that people think this (depression is a disease and it's treatable with pills) than the inverse (it's not a real disease)

    help a fellow forumer meet their mental health care needs because USA healthcare sucks!

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better

    bit.ly/2XQM1ke
  • DoobhDoobh She/Her, Ace Pan/Bisexual 8-) What's up, bootlickers?Registered User regular
    it will be a grizzly battle

    Miss me? Find me on:

    Twitch (I stream most days of the week)
    Twitter (mean leftist discourse)
    SedraxisMadEddyGoatmon
  • pimentopimento she/they/pim Registered User regular
    JohnHam wrote: »
    Vivixenne wrote: »
    I think I've mentioned this before in another context, but mental health needs feminism.

    The stats are that young women are diagnosed at higher rates of depression and anxiety than men and while some people translate this into women being more predisposed for it (and they are, like in cases of PND), I think it's also because women are more likely to actually talk about their feelings and get help and thus get diagnosed.

    Make it okay for men to express emotions verbally and be vulnerable. Please. For these men today, and more importantly for the next generation of men who will model their behaviour after them. Stop ridiculing these totally functionally healthy traits because they are "feminine". They're not. Your brain has the ability to learn how to do these things, regardless of your sex or even gender - NEUROPLASTICITY! The problem is PRACTICE.

    There's a book called "Why Boys Throw Better Than Girls" - it's a satirical piece that actually highlights a real reason for why, on average, boys throw better than girls. This is because it's been made okay for boys to do this repetitively from a young age, perpetuating into adolescence (usually). Whereas girls don't do throw as often because it's not "girly" to be into sport or some bullshit like that. Yet, if a girl throws with the same frequency and repetition from a young age as a boy, they throw just as accurately and with almost equal efficiency.

    Mo'Ne Davis is just a fabulous example of this.

    So, by a similar token, boys are shitty at expressing their feelings (by and large) and seeking help because they were never encouraged to actually practice doing it.

    I was confronted with this nonsense at a very young age (12) when I approached my parents and asked to go to a therapist/psych professional of some sort to deal with brain stuff. They repeatedly attempted to discourage me from doing it, and then did not actually act on my request for a long time after I initially asked. I remember overhearing bits and pieces of adult conversations that amounted to "what does a little boy need to see a psychologist for?" Ultimately, I got my way after some escalation, and that therapist gave me a huge suite of mental tools that I put to use EVERY DAY OF MY LIFE and have improved my ability to communicate and compartmentalize my feelings in a way that's emotionally healthy.

    It's perplexing to me that dudes can't understand how patriarchal attitudes harm even them.

    Admitting that there's a problem with 'being manly' isn't manly. Changing that requires a fundamental shift in the messaging doled out to people at all stages of life.

    I had a bunch of stuff written here, but it's not really necessary. I need feminism because my all boy high school experience kinda sucked.

    Vivixenne
  • NecoNeco Worthless Garbage Registered User regular
    I have not added anything to this thread really, as anything I would have to say could (and has!) been said better by many people in this thread.

    Since it is getting close to the dreaded page 100, though, I just wanted to say that this has been a good read. You are good peoples.

    pimentoArdol
  • HunteraHuntera Rude Boy Registered User regular
    edited August 2014
    Dubh wrote: »
    it will be a grizzly battle

    Not even the sun wants to bear witness to it*

    Huntera on
    Sedraxis
  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    That's what we're gonna do? Make bear puns for the rest of the thread?

    hibernating till next thread later

    GoatmonbalerbowerPonyJaysonFourNightDragonUsagiCaulk Bite 6AnialosDonovan PuppyfuckerShadowenSorceHellaJeffSedraxisLord_AsmodeusMoth 13MadEddy
  • TefTef Registered User regular
    bsjezz wrote: »
    actually faced with raising a son, it's hard. i know that i will specifically tell this one to talk about anything wrong with his health (and not just mental health), because not talking caused me to go through a heap of medical shit as a teenager that i'll always have to deal with. but at the same time, one of the most important things for me to impart to him is resilience. now that's not the same as stoicism: resilience involves coping strategies, stoicism is essentially deciding not to deal; but i want to make sure he is confronted with genuine challenges and tasked with finding a way to handle them. that's not always just talking, and indeed - depending on the problem - sometimes it can look a bit like stoicism.

    that it's hard to articulate how to handle any given situation means it's all the more important to be open and honest and a good model. and that's why i'm constantly asking myself right now, what do i need to change, before he's really listening?

    God, yes I really struggle with articulating this and you're on very similar lines to me on this one. I think the difficulty of discussing how to instil resiliency in a nuanced manner is why we often see the focus on other areas with little mention of it

    help a fellow forumer meet their mental health care needs because USA healthcare sucks!

    Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better

    bit.ly/2XQM1ke
  • Mr FuzzbuttMr Fuzzbutt Registered User regular
    Goatmon wrote: »
    Viv, no

    I will fight you tooth and claw to put a stop to your puns.

    Now now, there's no claws for alarm here.

    broken image link
    GoatmonSedraxisMadEddy
  • JohnHamJohnHam Registered User regular
    There's no reason to pooh-pooh these bear puns.

    signature.png

    GoatmonMadEddy
  • PonyPony Registered User regular
    i'm sorry, guys

    i didn't realize bear puns would be so

    polarizing

    DirtyDirtyVagrantDoobhGoatmonbalerbowerHeadCreepsLegbaAnialosRMS OceanicRhesus PositiveShadowenMr FuzzbuttSorceBrovid HasselsmofElbasunuPsykomaSedraxismasterofmetroidLord_AsmodeusMoth 13tynicMadEddyTankHammer
  • bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    as far as raising a patriarchy smasher, though, i dunno, i always figured i'd just chuck him in an arts degree like his old man

    sC4Q4nq.jpg
  • pimentopimento she/they/pim Registered User regular
    Bear puns might be a little fur off topic, but they're like a comforting teddy to hug, and in these grizzly times I think they're appawpriate.

    VivixenneShadowenSedraxisMadEddyGoatmon
  • knitdanknitdan In ur base Killin ur guysRegistered User regular
    Bear puns?!?

    There's trouble bruin in these last few pages.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    DirtyDirtyVagrantRhesus PositiveShadowenMadEddyGoatmon
  • HunteraHuntera Rude Boy Registered User regular
    JohnHam wrote: »
    There's no reason to pooh-pooh these bear puns.

    honey, you best roar up a different tree

  • VeldrinVeldrin Sham bam bamina Registered User regular
    Pony wrote: »
    One thing I'll give my parents credit for is they did not raise me with the notion that "boys don't cry".

    My dad was of the view that "Men who repress their emotions go insane", and pointed out that historically it was considered manly to cry and show emotion because it meant you gave a shit and that all this stiff upper lip holding it in shit was uptight garbage of lesser men who were always afraid of their position relative to others.

    This is something I am extremely grateful for in my parents.

    As far back as I can remember, they have both always strongly encouraged me to have a safe release in one form or another, and actively assisted wherever they could.

    This ranged from things like simply sitting with me on the road in the rain while I sobbed incoherently for an hour, to participating in lengthy discussions about the universe/life/spirituality/science, to going on a 20km bike ride to go play paintball.

    They weren't perfect parents, but they were the right ones for me.

    Odinpimento
  • JohnHamJohnHam Registered User regular
    Huntera wrote: »
    JohnHam wrote: »
    There's no reason to pooh-pooh these bear puns.

    honey, you best roar up a different tree

    I'm sick of you people padding tons of threads with bear posts.

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    ButlerpimentoCaulk Bite 6GoatmonceresAnialosRhesus PositiveShadowenFyndirMoth 13V1mMadEddy
  • JarsJars Registered User regular
    all you need to do is put on a carefree face because if you don't let anything bother you nothing will make you sad and wait I'm doing it to myself right now ahaha just laugh it off

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